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Late roman spatha\'s with stripe pattern
#46
Quote:FYI, the whatchamacallits for oars are called "oarlocks" or "rowlocks"... A simple peg without the V is a "tholepin," Latin scalmus (from Gk. skalmos).

It was just a wild guess of mine :lol:

Thanks Andrew!
Jef Pinceel
a.k.a.
Marcvs Mvmmivs Falco

LEG XI CPF vzw
>Q SER FEST
www.LEGIOXI.be
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#47
Hi Marcus,

Quote:I have just discovered the above swords have a metallic grip assembly.

The originals were made of either silver plate, or were something else that was then silver plated.

Andrew
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#48
In fact, the late metallic hilts of Germanic origin were made of wood and then covered by the embossed silver sheet, which was nailed to it. I had never seen the same thing on a 'standard' Roman hilt... Confusedhock:

Aitor
It\'s all an accident, an accident of hands. Mine, others, all without mind, from one extreme to another, but neither works nor will ever.

Rolf Steiner
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#49
SALVE

The famous Mainz Type sword founded at Rheingonheim was made of pommel, grip and guard of wood covered by a thin silver sheet. Can we think in a germanic kind of ornate a roman weapon?

VALE
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#50
Oh, yes, I forgot that one! :oops:
No, no, when I said 'Germanic' I was specifically referring to this kind of grip:
[Image: 07190049.jpg]


Aitor
It\'s all an accident, an accident of hands. Mine, others, all without mind, from one extreme to another, but neither works nor will ever.

Rolf Steiner
Reply
#51
Thanks for clearing that one up Aitor. The translation into English I have was not that clear.

Perhaps the below sword is the same, and the wood has simply rotted away in the ground, leaving just what ever metal was covering it?

http://membres.lycos.fr/bronzeage/iron_age/07180081.jpg

Andrew
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#52
Andrew,
That's what I think it happened. The peat bog wasn't acid enough as to preserve the wood but it, on the other hand, spared the iron...

Aitor
It\'s all an accident, an accident of hands. Mine, others, all without mind, from one extreme to another, but neither works nor will ever.

Rolf Steiner
Reply


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