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HBO Rome-Blog on Legio VI website
#16
Ave Flavius (my Centurio by the way),

Where is the Jewish thing going. I think that is getting a little too silly. The priest sounded more like Shlomo Goldstein at Art's Deli in Sherman Oaks. I was waiting for someone in the congregation to claim to be a cheesemaker.

Demetrius
Bruce
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#17
Quote:Where is the Jewish thing going. I think that is getting a little too silly. The priest sounded more like Shlomo Goldstein at Art's Deli in Sherman Oaks. I was waiting for someone in the congregation to claim to be a cheesemaker.

Mimis! Excellent to see you on the RAT board!

Yeah, the Jewish thing was so weird I didn't even feel like talking about it in the blog. My notes for the show read something like "high priest (or rabbi or whatever) has a huuuuge nose." Talk about stereotypes! And the "fight" when all the thugs rushed in and started roughing up the Sanhedron (or whatever they were supposed to be) looked more like the mosh pit of a punk rock concert. I wasn't even sure, at first, whether this was supposed to be happening in Jerusalem, or Rome, or wherever (it turned out to be a synagog in Rome...I think). Anyway, it is hard to know where this is going, because the big Judaean rebellion doesn't happen for another 100 years or so, so it can't really be part of this series. Unless we end up with a segement about Herod the Great getting installed in Judaea, which is possible, I suppose (we'd better meet Herod pretty soon, though). Seems a major distraction from the main thrust of the story, though. Personally, I'd rather watch Timon get it on with Atia some more...
T. Flavius Crispus / David S. Michaels
Centurio Pilus Prior,
Legio VI VPF
CA, USA

"Oderint dum probent."
Tiberius
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#18
Salve,Flavius,
I believe if you watch that episode again the elders do mention Herod
before the trouble starts. Yeah, I was wondering about the whole Jewish revolt myself,being a little early,but wasn't there one long befor the famous Bar Kochba revolt. Then again, this is REALLY early,isn't it?
Maybe just a way to get the Timon story over with.
Andy Booker

Gaivs Antonivs Satvrninvs

Andronikos of Athens
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#19
A few years before this, Pompey's army beseiged the Temple and all the priests were slaughtered, which might have caused some hard feelings. Granted, he was just aiding one Jewish faction in exterminating another Jewish faction, but the survivors probably blamed the Romans anyway. Personally, I'd like to see a realistic depiction of Herod. He was one of the most remarkable of all the Hellenistic monarchs, and it's unfortunate that his reputation has come down to us mainly from the New Testament, at which time he was just a paranoid old man, long past his glory years, and that he is confused with Antipas since the N.T. only uses the name "Herod."
Pecunia non olet
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#20
Ave Amicii,

Just to be sure I don't get in trouble and accussed of being an anti-semite as I did on another Roman site, I am Jewish and a Zionist. Now.....


As far as Timon and Atia go...well....maybe it has something to do with circumcinsion.

I am uterly fascinated by Herod too. When he was in Jerusalem he was a devote Jew, but in Roman a devote pagag. When in Rome?

On to the meat of the issue. As many of you know, Judea was like Iraq is today. 2-4 factions (or something like that) trying to take control. If the Romans did not come in (I do believe they were requested) the Jews would have exterminated each other. I was forced to grow up in a Reform synagogue (Reformed from what I always wondered) which was very Liberal. Just like in Animal Farm we were taught Romans/Greeks-evil Ancient Hebrews-good. As a young lad, I always challenged this assumption and now one paid me any mind. For my Bar Mitzvah, we (our class) had to write a paper imagining we were in Judea in the Bar Kochba rebellion and who and what we would be. And what did I write?

A Roman Centurion or a Jewish Allied Soldier or policemen. :mrgreen:


Flavius-I noticed the nose thing too. I don't mind the stereotypes and alot of Jews in Rome were probably thuggish types, but the silly stuff is too distracting. I think it would have been good just to leave it that Timon was a Jew and not spill over into the rebellious thing. If they are going to use this as a bridge to Herod than we are looking at a whole season to develop this.



Vale Amicis


Demetrius
Bruce
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#21
Demetrius said:

Quote:I was forced to grow up in a Reform synagogue (Reformed from what I always wondered) which was very Liberal. Just like in Animal Farm we were taught Romans/Greeks-evil Ancient Hebrews-good. As a young lad, I always challenged this assumption and now one paid me any mind. For my Bar Mitzvah, we (our class) had to write a paper imagining we were in Judea in the Bar Kochba rebellion and who and what we would be. And what did I write?

A Roman Centurion or a Jewish Allied Soldier or policemen.

Say, you weren't a writer on "Life of Brian", were you?

Quote:REG:
All right, but apart from the sanitation, the medicine, education, wine, public order, irrigation, roads, a fresh water system, and public health, what have the Romans ever done for us?

Smile

rkmvca/rich klein
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#22
Crucifixtion, good cheese and wine, and doormouse.

Demetrius
Bruce
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#23
Well Amicis,

Now we now what the Jews are up to. Great portray of Herod. I was very happy to see a fairly authentic looking Roman synagogue. Synagogues, as we know them, actually did not exist. They were established, much like early "churches", after the Trajan period when the Jews were so dispersed.
The only visible symbol of Jews would be a menorah and no Star of David. A Jewish meeting place would be very Hellenic in nature. ROME got that right, but I think there was a Star of David on the entrance.

Timon will never be able to join John Cleese's JPLF, PLFF, or JLA.

Demetrius
Bruce
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#24
I think this episode set a record for on-screen screwing.
Pecunia non olet
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#25
Quote:I think this episode set a record for on-screen screwing

Yes, indeedy, a lot of "boinking" going on there. Oddly enough, I thought of it as a very female-oriented episode, maybe compensation for the previous couple of macho, military-oriented ones. The subtext of this one was "getting hitched" -- it starts out with a wedding (Locusta and Posca), moves on to Pullo canoodling with his pregnant wife, moves on to an engagement, goes into more canoodling (Atia and Antony), then to some pretty hard-core "boinking" (Pullo and Gaia), some more "boinking" (Agrippa and Octavia), more canoodling (Atia and Antony), and finally another wedding (Antony and Octavia), followed by more boinking (same). Which brings up the question: Do women like to watch on-screen canoodling, or hard-core "boinking"?
T. Flavius Crispus / David S. Michaels
Centurio Pilus Prior,
Legio VI VPF
CA, USA

"Oderint dum probent."
Tiberius
Reply
#26
Quote:Personally, I'd like to see a realistic depiction of Herod. He was one of the most remarkable of all the Hellenistic monarchs, and it's unfortunate that his reputation has come down to us mainly from the New Testament..."

Josephus has much more on Herod than NT and is by far the primary source on his character.
M. CVRIVS ALEXANDER
(Alexander Kyrychenko)
LEG XI CPF

quando omni flunkus, mortati
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#27
Flavius:
You neglected to mention Vorena and the nameless thug boinking.
Alexander:
True, but Josephus isn't read much compared to the New Testament.
Pecunia non olet
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#28
Finally. Ding, dong, the wicked witch is dead. I had gotten sooo tired of Servilia and her curses (although, she couldn't exit without another one).
Aka
Christoph
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#29
I'm looking for Atia to exit soon as a result of Servilia's curse and her disappointment at not being Anthony's bethrothed.
I liked when Pullo's wife thought he should give the slave (Gaia) a whipping like that more often :wink: .
Andy Booker

Gaivs Antonivs Satvrninvs

Andronikos of Athens
Reply
#30
Quote:You neglected to mention Vorena and the nameless thug boinking.

Actually, I sort of thought they were still at the canoodling stage, pre-boinking, when Memmio showed up.

Quote:Finally. Ding, dong, the wicked witch is dead. I had gotten sooo tired of Servilia and her curses (although, she couldn't exit without another one).

Absolutely! Funny thing, I actually liked Servilia while she was getting it on with Caesar. But when he dumped her and she became the mother of all vindictive b*tches, all those feelings evaporated.

Quote:I'm looking for Atia to exit soon as a result of Servilia's curse and her disappointment at not being Anthony's bethrothed.

Maybe, but something tells me she hasn't suffered enough for her sins, and her demise may be a ways off yet.

The real Atia supposedly died in 43 BC (around the same time as Servilia, curiously) at the age of 42, and was given a lovely funeral oration by her son.
T. Flavius Crispus / David S. Michaels
Centurio Pilus Prior,
Legio VI VPF
CA, USA

"Oderint dum probent."
Tiberius
Reply


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