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Leather Cuirass
#16
I don't think there is any evidence at all. All you have is a coloured sculpture.
Author: Bronze Age Military Equipment, Pen & Sword Books
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#17
Well the statues are same time same place. One was clearly painted to show a bronze cuirass and the other to show some non-metalic armor.
I have not seen evidence for muscled shaped linothorax yet.
The same color of the cuirass appears in a later sarkofagos shwoing horsemen wearing boots in the same buff color.
My mistake was not taking enough photos even of the cell phone's louzy quality .
If more and more collections become phasmatoscopicaly reconstructed we might draw safer conclusions. So far I am inclined to believe in absence of better evidence that the non metallic material can be hide or skin armor.
Any one knows any net links with more reconstructed collections?

Kind regards
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#18
Ah. Sounds more convincing. How likely it is that all were done by the same artist?
Author: Bronze Age Military Equipment, Pen & Sword Books
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#19
Well it this is the 64000 dollar question Dan.
Only info that they were from Afea Aegina late 6th century B.C was on the reconstructions. The signs were not very informative. If anyone knows more on the originals in the Anitkesammelung it would be more helpful in this topic.
Kind regards
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#20
It is also important to remember that final colour may not have any relation to construction material as the greeks were fond of painting everything! Also the use of bronze muscled cuirass with ptregues is not uncommon, Jarva has a whole section on them in his book.

Jason
"History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again." Maya Angelou
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#21
Well I know of painted bronze thorax. We reconstructed one in the Greek warrior impression thread. The only thing that is that the cuirass of the one statue was painted bronze and the other a buff colour like the one in many other statues showing sandals and belts.

Kind regards
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#22
Well better pictures of the 2 reconstructed statues.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image ... orso_3.JPG
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image ... orso_5.JPG
Also a correction. They are not from Aegian but from Acropolis.
Same date 470 B.C. One seems to have hide armor or spolas(?).

Kind regards
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#23
Quote:Well better pictures of the 2 reconstructed statues.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image ... orso_3.JPG
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image ... orso_5.JPG
Also a correction. They are not from Aegian but from Acropolis.
Same date 470 B.C. One seems to have hide armor or spolas(?).

Kind regards

So these are two separate sculptures that just happened to be identical and break in the exact same places in the exact same ways?
Ruben

He had with him the selfsame rifle you see with him now, all mounted in german silver and the name that he\'d give it set with silver wire under the checkpiece in latin: Et In Arcadia Ego. Common enough for a man to name his gun. His is the first and only ever I seen with an inscription from the classics. - Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian
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#24
Indeed. Very fishy. IMO it is the same sculpture in both images with different paint jobs.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image ... orso_1.JPG
Author: Bronze Age Military Equipment, Pen & Sword Books
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#25
It almost as if the tests and examination were inconclusive, and what's offered are two possibilities as interpreted from the results?
TARBICvS/Jim Bowers
A A A DESEDO DESEDO!
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#26
I'm no sculpture expert, but ... isn't it suspicious that there's a hem-line at the waist, but nothing at the collar or shoulder?
[Image: Cuirassed_torso.jpg]
If the sculpture had been broken a metre (?) higher up, we'd presume that it was naked.
posted by Duncan B Campbell
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#27
Thank you all for you insight.
I should have been suspicious after they changed the location from Aegina to Acropolis.

Kind regards
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#28
Also,isn't that a broken penis?However,they have painted all the place under the hem line...it seems they cannot be trusted
Giannis K. Hoplite
a.k.a.:Giannis Kadoglou
a.k.a.:Thorax
[Image: -side-1.gif]
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#29
Quote:I'm no sculpture expert, but ... isn't it suspicious that there's a hem-line at the waist, but nothing at the collar or shoulder?
[Image: Cuirassed_torso.jpg]
If the sculpture had been broken a metre (?) higher up, we'd presume that it was naked.

Quote:Also,isn't that a broken penis?However,they have painted all the place under the hem line...it seems they cannot be trusted

The sculpture and the general reconstruction is reliable (i.e. the pattern on the tunic underneath), it's just a matter of which of why they have two different reconstructions. As you can see from many of the other sculptures on show in the Bunte Götter exhibit, hem-lines and edges of clothing or equipment were often simply painted in. Also, it does appear that some "nude" sculptures actually had clothes painted over them, even with genitalia exposed!
Ruben

He had with him the selfsame rifle you see with him now, all mounted in german silver and the name that he\'d give it set with silver wire under the checkpiece in latin: Et In Arcadia Ego. Common enough for a man to name his gun. His is the first and only ever I seen with an inscription from the classics. - Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian
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#30
The lower edge is clearly what one would expect from a cuirass, while the armpit shows none and the "armour", at this point follows the body in the unrealistic "clinging" manner noted earlier by Giannis. Basically, the thing contradicts itself. I think the artist must have intended to convey the idea of armour, but whether metal or leather is impossible to guess.
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