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The Huns
#1
I will try to make a recopilation about the campaigns and how are the Huns "armies". Of course, I will accept your help (and probably I will need it Big Grin ).

If you are patient, I will post (if I have time tomorrow), tomorrow.
[Image: gaudentius.gif]

Magister Equitum Gaudentius :wink: <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" />:wink:

Valerius/Jorge
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#2
The Huns appear officially in history only when their hordes coming from the east reach the Roman Empire and in a very short time they conquer most of Europe. The Hun´s origin is connected with the Sumerians and the Scythians.

Later the next chapter... Big Grin

I will speak about the conection between the Huns and the Xiong-nu that were defeated by the Chinese Empire.

P.D. I hope that some experts about this topic help me in this post. :wink:
[Image: gaudentius.gif]

Magister Equitum Gaudentius :wink: <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" />:wink:

Valerius/Jorge
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#3
Although I have already established myself as somewhat deficient in the Hun knowledge department, I do have one observation.

The Xiong-nu (or Hsiang-nu depending on whose transliteration you're reading) were, I understand, related to the Huns or perhaps were proto-Huns. The expansion of the Han empire is supposed to have displaced them and caused them to move west where they started a kind of billiard ball effect on the various steppe peoples that moved each in turn towards a clash with Rome.

I wonder how different history would be if the Huns hadn't been beaten by the Chinese.
[Image: artorivs-mcmlx.gif]
[size=75:y4iezjz4]David Sullivan
Lynnwood, WA USA[/size]
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#4
Ave Artorius1960,

Hello again.

Although I have nothing to add to your discussion, I must congratulate you on your signature, very appropriate.

I wonder if you would consider making one for me?

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo

PS. Have either of you read Marcel Brion's "ATTILA The Scourge of God" published by Cassell & Co. in 1929?
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
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#5
Quote:Although I have already established myself as somewhat deficient in the Hun knowledge department, I do have one observation.

The Xiong-nu (or Hsiang-nu depending on whose transliteration you're reading) were, I understand, related to the Huns or perhaps were proto-Huns. The expansion of the Han empire is supposed to have displaced them and caused them to move west where they started a kind of billiard ball effect on the various steppe peoples that moved each in turn towards a clash with Rome.

I wonder how different history would be if the Huns hadn't been beaten by the Chinese.

Perhaps will be writening in this forum in Latin. :roll: Big Grin
[Image: gaudentius.gif]

Magister Equitum Gaudentius :wink: <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" />:wink:

Valerius/Jorge
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#6
Ave!

I found this on the internet.

"[i]The Huns

The Huns were possibly the most destructive people in history. They originally came from Central Asia. About 200BC, the Huns overran the Chinese Empire. Chinese emperor Shih Huang-ti built the massive Great Wall of China to keep the Huns out.

The Huns were pastoralists, which means they tended to animals. Throughout history, pastoralists have generally been more warlike than farmers, and the Huns were no exception. The Huns were skilled horsemen who used their skills to plunder more settled people. They moved into the land west of the Caspian Sea, forcing the Visigoths and other Germanic tribes to move into the Roman Empire. The Huns were illiterate and had no interest in the lands they raided. They simply attacked and plundered.

In 445, Attila became the sole leader of the Huns after murdering his brother. The Romans called Attila the “Scourge of God.â€
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
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#7
Quote:Although I have nothing to add to your discussion, I must congratulate you on your signature, very appropriate.

I wonder if you would consider making one for me?

I'd be happy to. It took me no more than a little bit of playing around to do mine. Let me know how you want it to look and what you want it to say.
[Image: artorivs-mcmlx.gif]
[size=75:y4iezjz4]David Sullivan
Lynnwood, WA USA[/size]
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#8
Quote:
Quote:Although I have nothing to add to your discussion, I must congratulate you on your signature, very appropriate.

I wonder if you would consider making one for me?

I'd be happy to. It took me no more than a little bit of playing around to do mine. Let me know how you want it to look and what you want it to say.

Me too. :lol:
[Image: gaudentius.gif]

Magister Equitum Gaudentius :wink: <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" />:wink:

Valerius/Jorge
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#9
Quote:
Quote:Although I have nothing to add to your discussion, I must congratulate you on your signature, very appropriate.
I wonder if you would consider making one for me?
I'd be happy to. It took me no more than a little bit of playing around to do mine. Let me know how you want it to look and what you want it to say.

Ave Artorius1960,

Thank you for your kind offer.

If possible, I would like M. Spedius Corbulo inscribed on a faded green tablet just like yours? A sort of mini-diploma!

You could start a nice little service here, building these signature tablets for the other members. You could charge one kahma point each.

When you've completed mine, I will be awarding you a kahma point, as a thank you.

What programme did you use to build yours? I particularly like the inscribed effect, as I said before, very appropriate.

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
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#10
I'll do it tonight after squash--if I can still function.

I use Photoshop, the software app of the gods.

The granity look is just a pattern I created from a digital pic of a "clear" bit of one of the Adamklissi metopes.
[Image: artorivs-mcmlx.gif]
[size=75:y4iezjz4]David Sullivan
Lynnwood, WA USA[/size]
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#11
It's been written that the Huns compressed their children noses with bandages in order to make'em flat and fit better inside the helms nasals... Wouldn't have been easier to make the helmets bigger? :?
[Image: 120px-Septimani_seniores_shield_pattern.svg.png] [Image: Estalada.gif]
Ivan Perelló
[size=150:iu1l6t4o]Credo in Spatham, Corvus sum bellorum[/size]
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#12
Quote:The Hun´s origin is connected with the Sumerians and the Scythians.
:!:
I would be cautious and wary of any sources that purport to make links between the Sumerians, Scythians, and Huns. On one level, although it is risky to equate peoples with languages, the Huns spoke a Turkic language, the Scythians an Indo-European language, and Sumerian is an isolate, meaning it's not related to any other known languages. Tread with caution...
Dan Diffendale
Ph.D. candidate, University of Michigan
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#13
Quote:Me too. :lol:

I'd be happy to. How would you like it to look?
[Image: artorivs-mcmlx.gif]
[size=75:y4iezjz4]David Sullivan
Lynnwood, WA USA[/size]
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#14
The Hsiang-nu were not related to the Huns as far as i am aware, a bit of a misconception. The Huns were of mongoloid stock and very asiatic in appearance whereas the Hsiang-nu were, according to the Chinese caucasian, some with red hair.
This misconception is fostered unfortunately by several Osprey books which continually depict ALL nomads like the Cumans etc as Asiatic :evil:

The Avars which later invaded old Hunnic territory and absorbed the remnants of these tribes were asiatic in appearance and possibly the same as the Juan Juan.
Kuura/Jools Sleap.

\'\'\'\'Let us measure our swords, appraise our blades\'\'\'\' The Kalevala.

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.livinghistory.co.uk/homepages/palacecompany/">http://www.livinghistory.co.uk/homepages/palacecompany/
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#15
Quote:It's been written that the Huns compressed their children noses with bandages in order to make'em flat and fit better inside the helms nasals... Wouldn't have been easier to make the helmets bigger?
_________________

Cranial deformation.

Not done as a functional aid but as , what they considered a corrective method to make themselves more attractive Confusedhock:

The Sarmatians, Gepids and some Goth tribes did the same, presumably under Hun influence. Basically you wrap the babies head in bandages or wide thongs to compress the soft unfused bones in the cranium. These later fuse together to give an elongated, sloping forehead.

Other cultures practiced the same deformation such as the Maya, apparently prefering boards to bandages :wink:
Kuura/Jools Sleap.

\'\'\'\'Let us measure our swords, appraise our blades\'\'\'\' The Kalevala.

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.livinghistory.co.uk/homepages/palacecompany/">http://www.livinghistory.co.uk/homepages/palacecompany/
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