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Imperial Governor!
#46
Ave!

Today's offerings are:-

Another review from Amazon.com

"How it was at sharp end of the legions, December 16, 2001
Reviewer: ( [email protected] ) from london
As always Shipway combines historical accuracy and military reality with a cynical and ambitious individual - great to see it back !!
"

The next item is in the form of a diary.

http://www.channel4.com/history/microsi ... /blog.html

"[i]Background:
The Roman writers Tacitus and Cassius Dio both tell us the story of the Boudiccan Revolt of AD61; where the Iceni tribe (covering modern day Norfolk and Suffolk) rebelled against the Romans after the savage treatment of their queen. Archaeological evidence clearly shows that Colchester, London and St Albans suffered devastating fires and destruction during the first century, and one of the most amazing finds of all Roman Britain is connected with these events. In 1907 a boy was swimming in the River Alde in Suffolk when he discovered the ripped off bronze statue head of the deified emperor Claudius, once a dominating symbol of Rome adorning the temple precinct at Colchester.

Name: Miccus Asto Age: 32
About Me: I'm Miccus Asto, a farmer of the Iceni tribe but educated. After years of struggle against high taxes and imposed Roman laws fed down through the diplomatic wrangling of our king, Prasutagus, life is certainly a lot harder than it used to be.

I can feel dark times ahead. The festival of Samhain has passed and along with our usual memories of the dead we have mourned the death of King Prasutagus. He was a good king, with good intentions but I doubt that his good intentions are matched by those of our Roman “friendsâ€
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
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#47
after i've read Orlando furioso & Paradise Lost i will start on this one..

I haven't read the books of Manda Scott but my girlfriend says that they are great. They also deal with the Boudicca-revolt but from Boudicca's point-of-view. It is composed of 4 books (dreaming the eagle, dreaming the bull, dreaming the hound & dreaming the snake).

some time ago there also was a program regarding Boudica on the BBC ("Battlefield Britain").
gr,
Jeroen Pelgrom
Rules for Posting

I would rather have fire storms of atmospheres than this cruel descent from a thousand years of dreams.
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#48
Ave!

This morning I created the first item in the discussion tab connected to the George Shipway entry at "Wikipedia".

See this item at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:George_Shipway

It is my sincerest wish to not only create interest in George Shipway and "Imperial Governor" but also RomanArmyTalk by using this method.

Wikipedia is visited by vast numbers on a daily basis, as I write this topic has had 539 views. Let's see if the number increases dramatically because of the "Wikipedia" entry.

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
Reply
#49
Quote:after i've read Orlando furioso & Paradise Lost i will start on this one..
some time ago there also was a program regarding Boudica on the BBC ("Battlefield Britain").

Ave pelgr003,

Good morning, welcome back.

I feel sure that you, and your girlfriend, will enjoy "Imperial Governor" as much as I, and those others whose reviews I've included, have.

I missed the BBC programme on Boudicca, was it well done? Perhaps it will be issued on DVD?

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
Reply
#50
Hi Spedius,

i don't know about a DVD but i've found these 2 links:

BATTLEFIELD BRITAIN - 2000 YEARS OF CONFLICT ON BRITISH SOIL

and
Battlefield Britain (Book)

I really liked the program. The final battle was well done - it gave a good idea why Boudicca was defeated that day.
gr,
Jeroen Pelgrom
Rules for Posting

I would rather have fire storms of atmospheres than this cruel descent from a thousand years of dreams.
Reply
#51
Ave pelgr003,

Well done, I've rewarded your diligence with a kahma point.

It's good to know that I'm not alone in my search for items on or about Boudicca and "Imperial Governor".

Here's another review from Amazon.com.

"One of the better Roman novels . . ., April 26, 2004
Reviewer: fastreaderslowlearner (the Deep South)

There are plenty of reviews dealing with the plotline; so, if it's o.k., I'm mainly going to deal with my impression of the book . . .

Imperial Governor is one of the better historical novels I've read. If you like your reading to be seamless, entertaining, as close to a "page turner" as possible AND chock full of factual history, then this is a very good book for you to pick up. The story deals with Rome's occupation of Britain, or at least the few years involving Paulinius' reign as governor, which spans Boudicca's revolt. The perspective is definitely that of the Roman, particularly Paulinius. Nothing wrong with that, but if you are looking for something more from the side of Britain or Boudicca, keep looking (but don't fail to read this too.)

Well written, vastly entertaining, and enlightening . . . If you're into history in general or Roman in particular, get this book.
"

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
Reply
#52
Quote:She loved the books of Manda Scott (Boudica: dreaming the eagle + dreaming the bull+ dreaming the hound) so i think that she propably loves this one as well.

Jeroen, be advised that the books may not be compatible. I've read halfway throiugh 'Dreaming the eagle' and in my opinion it's a decent historical novel killed by romantic Celtophile fantasy. If she liked it because of the history, she should be fine with Imperial Governor, but if the Celtic magical mystery tour had anything to do with it, she'll probably hate it.

Too many good men (and sifgnificantly more women) are lost to Rome because of this romantic Celtomania.
Der Kessel ist voll Bärks!

Volker Bach
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#53
Quote:Jeroen, be advised that the books may not be compatible. I've read halfway throiugh 'Dreaming the eagle' and in my opinion it's a decent historical novel killed by romantic Celtophile fantasy. If she liked it because of the history, she should be fine with Imperial Governor, but if the Celtic magical mystery tour had anything to do with it, she'll probably hate it.
Too many good men (and sifgnificantly more women) are lost to Rome because of this romantic Celtomania.

Ave Volker,

Welcome back and thank you for your wise words of caution.

Have you finshed reading "Imperial Governor" yet?

Do you feel that you can recommend the book to potential readers?

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
Reply
#54
Ave!

The story of and by Miccus Asto continues.

"posted by Miccus Asto Nov AD60

The Romans are on the move again. Paulinus Suetonius has taken many forces from our area and headed to the north west. Some say their goal is the Isle of Mona (modern day Anglesey) and that they are going to face the Druid priests. We all know that those who run from Rome head to the shelter of the Druids. so it could be true… But I have little time to give them more than a passing thought because life has got so bad for us. Centurions with a band of troops and old soldiers laid waste to the house of Boudicca. They have just destroyed the home and taken whatever they wanted. Boudicca was bound and beaten in public while her two daughters were raped. How can they bear that shame? How can we bear the shame of a queen who has been subjugated like this? A lesson to us all from Rome. But I have heard rumours of unrest stirring. Apparently Boudicca is travelling around the tribe in secret holding council with local chiefs.

A legionary approached my farm today and declared across the fence that my lands now belonged to Rome and would be given to a retiring soldier. I opened my mouth to reply but he simply turned on his horse and headed off to the next farm where I gather he delivered the same news. What makes these people think they can act like that? All of the farmers are going to meet in secret tomorrow. Maybe Boudicca will be with us.

(later addition)
She is the strongest woman I have met. I am fully prepared to follow her Come Imbolc, the festival of the spring, we will march on the Romans.
"

Part III continues tomorrow.

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
Reply
#55
Quote:Have you finshed reading "Imperial Governor" yet?

Do you feel that you can recommend the book to potential readers?

Yes, I finished it this weekend and I wholeheartedly recommend it. It is much more intelligent than it lets on at a cursory glance, and while some technicasl details are off, I think its mindset brings us closer to Rome than many of today's novelisations.
Der Kessel ist voll Bärks!

Volker Bach
Reply
#56
Quote:
Spedius:15pnkszj Wrote:Have you finshed reading "Imperial Governor" yet?
Do you feel that you can recommend the book to potential readers?
Yes, I finished it this weekend and I wholeheartedly recommend it. It is much more intelligent than it lets on at a cursory glance, and while some technicasl details are off, I think its mindset brings us closer to Rome than many of today's novelisations.

Ave Volker or Carlton, which do you prefer?

Thank you for your recommendation.

Yes, I too have noticed one or two errors, but I will deal with those in a later post, de-constructing "Imperial Governor".

If you had initiated this topic, how would you have gone about it? Would your approach have been very different to the one that I've chosen? Please feel free to give me your honest opinion.

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
Reply
#57
Ave!

Here is today's thrilling installment of Miccus Asto's story.

"posted by Miccus Asto Dec AD60

An amazing day. The centurion came back today with an old soldier to look at my farm. They simply ignored my protest and debated which of my children would make good slaves right in front of me, as if I was not there! As they left I was in a rage of despair, I felt so powerless. Then - great commotion. A band of our brave warriors attacked them at the end of the track and viciously killed them both in an instant. They deserved no better death and when their leader came to the house and demanded my support I gave it without a second thought. We head to the Roman colony of Camulodunum (Colchester) today. Boudicca will be there with our gathering forces. The Iceni will march and the Romans will get a chance to see how great their mistake has been!
"

Please return to read Part IV tomorrow.

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
Reply
#58
Ave!

The saga of Miccus Asto continues.

"posted by Miccus Asto - February AD61

The festival of Ostara approaches and it’s going to be a bloody summer! The fighting was so bitter in Camulodunum every trace of Roman life was destroyed by our war band. There was no mercy for those who have showed us no mercy. Even I have become skilful with the spear. I can’t count the number of women, men, horses I’ve killed now and I am glad that they are suffering at our hands. I’ve never seen so many warriors together as I do now. Our attack and victory has sealed our fate. If we fail we die. But if we win….if we win we will be free! Our lands free of Romans our children free of slavery, ourselves free of shame again. Camulodunum has been set on fire and it burns at our backs now that we are headed south to Londinium. Boudicca raced by me in her chariot this morning shouting her horses on, a bronze head of the Roman Claudius strapped across the axles. A massive cheer went up as she passed and I instantly felt alive again after all the trudging. Women and men are fired up just by a glimpse of her! Without Boudicca we would still be raging under despair and injustice.
"

Please return to read Part V tomorrow.

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
Reply
#59
Ave!

Here is today's installment of Miccus Asto's story.

"posted by Miccus Asto March AD61

Our numbers have swelled! We've been joined by the Trinovantes people. After our success I, like many, have sent word for my family to join me on the march.

These last two days we have wreaked havoc! We’re unstoppable! The Romans sent their IX Legion against us and we destroyed their foot soldiers as the cavalry turned tail like the cowards they are and ran away. I killed a Roman soldier. He looked scared and much younger than me. Had things been different I might have felt pity for him but I don’t have time for pitying a people who’s fate has come! I now have a legionary helmet as a prize, which I wore proudly as we sacked the port of Londinium. Boudicca gathered her leaders last night and the word is that we must now move north-west to meet the Roman counter attack which must surely come. Rumour has it that the legions in the north destroyed the Druids of Mona and now they come back for us. Some are uneasy, but no one can think about defeat when fate grants us every success! We’re going to be rich on the fruits of our freedom. Tomorrow we march north!
"

Please keep coming back, Part VI will be here tomorrow.

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
Reply
#60
I read 'Imperial Governor' quite recently and enjoyed it a great deal - interesting to see that so many others have done the same. There are certain inaccuracies, certainly, but bearing in mind when it was written these seem permissable. One of the best things about the book, actually, was its relative restraint in terms of plot - Shipway sticks close to the known facts and resists the temptation to make his protagonist unduly heroic or superhuman. The battle scenes are nicely done - the seaborne assault on Anglesea being particularly fine, I thought. In contrast to some other Roman military fictions, these are very much 'commander's battles', the action seen a remove, which gives them a certain veracity. Most commendable is the detailed imagining of the logistics of Roman warfare: the difficulties of moving great masses of men and equipment over difficult terrain and long distances, and marshalling them to face an elusive enemy.

I confess I prefer the use of the original Roman place names to their modern equivilents - London for Londinium is fine, but the idea of the Roman army marching through Godmanchester or besieging Norwich strikes an off note. These places may occupy the same physical position as their ancient counterparts, but have little else in common and seem slightly anachronistic - I think this was possibly, again, common practice at the time the book was written. The only really clanging episode in the novel, for me, was the erotic interlude with Cartimandua, which seemed frankly bizarre! The portrayal of the queen herself - a sort of multicoloured love-goddess - appeared to owe more to the date of the book (1968!) than any historical inspiration... bearing in mind Shipway's later work (the outlandish-sounding 'Chilian club', for instance!) we may assume that the author was not exactly keen on the cultural mores of the late sixties - interesting to speculate, perhaps, what strange impulses may have led Shipway to depict the queen of the Brigantes in such a way...

Why, incidentally, did he decide to set the final battle near Silchester, when virtually all modern guesses place it much further north? I could only assume that, for personal reasons, Shipway wanted to write a lot about Silchester... who knows?

About his own background, and Jim's previous comment on his military service - I doubt whether Mr Shipway would have seen many 'horrors' in India during WWII, unless he was posted to the Burmese border; peninsula India itself saw no fighting that I know of. Bearing in mind the date of his departure (1947), however, it's possible that he witnessed, and certainly would have heard about, the violent riots and massacres that accompanied independence and partition. Perhaps something of this leaked into 'Imperial Governor', in its descriptions of Boudicca's horde sacking London, for instance, or the conflicting and divided loyalties of those Britons who found themselves caught between opposing sides.

- Nathan
Nathan Ross
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