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Imperial Governor!
#16
I attach a copy of my article about George Shipway.
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#17
Well, I tried twice to attach a copy of the article, but nothing happened.

Anyone who wants it can e-mail me on [email protected] and I will send it to them.
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#18
Ave!

Here's the paperback cover of "Imperial Governor" published by Mayflower in 1972, ISBN 583-11626-4-2.

I thought it might add a "little extra" to the topic.

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
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#19
A blog is a kind of online diary - mine is called Books and Bricks (which reflects my interests) and is at: http://bleatings.blogspot.com/ There's not much Roman stuff recently, I'm afraid - though you can word-search the archives - but it gives you the idea. It's easy to sign up for blogs and most of them are free, like blogger: http://www.blogger.com
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#20
Ave Viventius,

Thank you for kindly explaining what a blog is, a sort of (b?) log as in ship's.

Some of you may be wondering why I'm including reviews from elsewhere in this topic.

I want to give our readers as many examples as possible of how others are reacting to "Imperial Governor".

Those that are not associated with this Forum may well have an entirely different slant from those that are.

Here are another pair from Amazon.com.

"Suetonius and Shipway ride again, June 14, 2003
Reviewer: A reader from Cardiff, United Kingdom
I read this novel in my teens and immediately devoured everything else I could find by George Shipway. Unfortunately, most of them were library books (pocket money being limited) and I was delighted to see this back in print. I hope it's the first of a series of reprints - Warrior in Bronze and its sequel would be top of my list
."

"Vivid, August 13, 2003
Reviewer: Chris Brokensha from Bath, UK.
Packed with historic detail and, at times very graphically and disturbing scenes, this book has to be one of the best historic novels I have ever read. Shipway’s use of language paints a vivid picture throughout the book and, although I found the character of Paulinus totally detestable, I couldn’t help myself feeling sympathetic towards him at the book’s conclusion
."

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
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#21
Alan has sent me his article The Cavalryman Rides Again: the historical novels of George Shipway and I have put it on my blog at:

http://tinyurl.com/nys88

(The full address of the article was rather long, so I've tiny-urled it)
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#22
Quote:Alan has sent me his article The Cavalryman Rides Again: the historical novels of George Shipway and I have put it on my blog at:
http://tinyurl.com/nys88
(The full address of the article was rather long, so I've tiny-urled it)

Ave Viventius,

He has also sent me a copy attached to an e-mail, it is excellent, isn't it?

I may post it in serialised form as it is quite long, what do you think?

Do you think that Alan would like to update the Wikipedia entry for George Shipway?

BTW your tinyurl doesn't work?

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
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#23
The url seems to work on my computer OK, but here is the long one; hope it doesn't muck up the thread?

http://bleatings.blogspot.com/2006/03/g ... -fisk.html
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#24
Quote:The url seems to work on my computer OK, but here is the long one; hope it doesn't muck up the thread?
http://bleatings.blogspot.com/2006/03/g ... -fisk.html

Ave Viventius,

That's much better.

I noticed you have incorporated two book covers into the article, "Imperial Governor" and "The Chilian Club".

Would you like some more book cover images?

I have a scanner and would happily scan four more for you, you will have to do some resizing though.

I have "The Paladin", "The Wolf Time", "Knight in Anarchy" and "Warrior in Bronze". They are all paperbacks from Mayflower.

I also have a picture of the man himself, scanned from the dust jacket of "Imperial Governor". Would you like that too?

Please let me know if you are interested.

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
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#25
I only had a quick look to see what I could find on the web, so I would be interested in the cover pics Big Grin I think the blogger programme resizes, as it gives a choice of small/medium/large when uploading.
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#26
Quote:I only had a quick look to see what I could find on the web, so I would be interested in the cover pics Big Grin I think the blogger programme resizes, as it gives a choice of small/medium/large when uploading.

Ave Viventius,

I also have the hardback version of "The Wolf Time", an ex-library copy which cost 40p about twenty years ago. Would you like a scan of that cover too?

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
Reply
#27
By Jim's request:
Greets!

Jasper Oorthuys
Webmaster & Editor, Ancient Warfare magazine
Reply
#28
Ave Viventius & Jasper,

Viventius, the book cover images have been sent to you attached to an e-mail.

Jasper, thank you very much for posting the image of George Shipway for me.

Here is another review found at Amazon.com.

"Imperial Governor, July 13, 2004
Reviewer: xerones from York, N. Yorks. United Kingdom
I first read this book as a teenager when it was published in hardcover. So it was with a feeling of nostalgia that I purchased and read the re-issued paperback recently. I was not disappointed. Although not the best of the bunch of historical novels set in the Roman period, it is much better than some. The characterization of a somewhat pompous, self-centred Roman aristocrat being posted to the outer reaches of the Empire by an Imperial court dominated by the factions surrounding Nero is excellent. The interactions between the Governor Suetonius Paulinus and the range of minor characters from native Britains to other Roman commanders and officials is well composed and the story is taught even if as in all 'true' historical novels, one knows the outcome. As a 'biography' it correctly approaches (the) subject from the Governor's perspective. For example, Boudi©ca is treated as a rebel (terrorist?) not a national hero which from the viewpoint of a Roman, is entirely correct. A good read
."

I would be interested to read your thoughts on my treatment of this subject. What would you do to enhance this topic?

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
Reply
#29
Ave!

One of the tests all writers of historical fiction face is the analysis of their novels by interested persons. This analysis can be in the form of direct comparisons between contemporary authors or, in Shipway's case, his ancient source.

AFAIK the only ancient author who covered our period of interest was Cornelius Tacitus.

Sitting on my bookshelves is "Tacitus - The Annals of Imperial Rome" published by Penquin Classics in 1977, ISBN 0-14-044.060-7, translated by Michael Grant.

The section which relates to Shipway's "Imperial Governor" is in Tacitus book XIV for the years 59-62, on pages 327 to 332.

Having identified which of Tacitus's books the passage was in, I searched for it on the internet, simply using the keyword tacitus.

Here is what I found at http://classics.mit.edu/Tacitus/annals.10.xiv.html

This passage is an extract from:-

"The Annals

By Tacitus

Written 109 A.C.E.

Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb

Book XIV

A.D. 59-62

In the consulship of Caesonius Paetus and Petronius Turpilianus (1), a serious disaster was sustained in Britain, where Aulius Didius, the emperor's legate, had merely retained our existing possessions, and his successor Veranius, after having ravaged the Silures in some trifling raids, was prevented by death from extending the war. While he lived, he had a great name for manly independence, though, in his will's final words, he betrayed a flatterer's weakness; for, after heaping adulation on Nero, he added that he should have conquered the province for him, had he lived for the next two years. Now, however, Britain was in the hands of Suetonius Paulinus, who in military knowledge and in popular favour, which allows no one to be without a rival, vied with Corbulo, and aspired to equal the glory of the recovery of Armenia by the subjugation of Rome's enemies. He therefore prepared to attack the island of Mona which had a powerful population and was a refuge for fugitives. He built flat-bottomed vessels to cope with the shallows, and uncertain depths of the sea. Thus the infantry crossed, while the cavalry followed by fording, or, where the water was deep, swam by the side of their horses.

On the shore stood the opposing army with its dense array of armed warriors, while between the ranks dashed women, in black attire like the Furies, with hair dishevelled, waving brands. All around, the Druids, lifting up their hands to heaven, and pouring forth dreadful imprecations, scared our soldiers by the unfamiliar sight, so that, as if their limbs were paralysed, they stood motionless, and exposed to wounds. Then urged by their general's appeals and mutual encouragements not to quail before a troop of frenzied women, they bore the standards onwards, smote down all resistance, and wrapped the foe in the flames of his own brands. A force was next set over the conquered, and their groves, devoted to inhuman superstitions, were destroyed. They deemed it indeed a duty to cover their altars with the blood of captives and to consult their deities through human entrails.

Suetonius while thus occupied received tidings of the sudden revolt of the province. Prasutagus, king of the Iceni, famed for his long prosperity, had made the emperor his heir along with his two daughters, under the impression that this token of submission would put his kingdom and his house out of the reach of wrong. But the reverse was the result, so much so that his kingdom was plundered by centurions, his house by slaves, as if they were the spoils of war. First, his wife Boudicea was scourged, and his daughters outraged. All the chief men of the Iceni, as if Rome had received the whole country as a gift, were stript of their ancestral possessions, and the king's relatives were made slaves. Roused by these insults and the dread of worse, reduced as they now were into the condition of a province, they flew to arms and stirred to revolt the Trinobantes and others who, not yet cowed by slavery, had agreed in secret conspiracy to reclaim their freedom. It was against the veterans that their hatred was most intense. For these new settlers in the colony of Camulodunum drove people out of their houses, ejected them from their farms, called them captives and slaves, and the lawlessness of the veterans was encouraged by the soldiers, who lived a similar life and hoped for similar licence. A temple also erected to the Divine Claudius was ever before their eyes, a citadel, as it seemed, of perpetual tyranny. Men chosen as priests had to squander their whole fortunes under the pretence of a religious ceremonial. It appeared too no difficult matter to destroy the colony, undefended as it was by fortifications, a precaution neglected by our generals, while they thought more of what was agreeable than of what was expedient.

Meanwhile, without any evident cause, the statue of Victory at Camulodunum fell prostrate and turned its back to the enemy, as though it fled before them. Women excited to frenzy prophesied impending destruction; ravings in a strange tongue, it was said, were heard in their Senate-house; their theatre resounded with wailings, and in the estuary of the Tamesa had been seen the appearance of an overthrown town; even the ocean had worn the aspect of blood, and, when the tide ebbed, there had been left the likenesses of human forms, marvels interpreted by the Britons, as hopeful, by the veterans, as alarming. But as Suetonius was far away, they implored aid from the procurator, Catus Decianus. All he did was to send two hundred men, and no more, without regular arms, and there was in the place but a small military force. Trusting to the protection of the temple, hindered too by secret accomplices in the revolt, who embarrassed their plans, they had constructed neither fosse nor rampart; nor had they removed their old men and women, leaving their youth alone to face the foe. Surprised, as it were, in the midst of peace, they were surrounded by an immense host of the barbarians. All else was plundered or fired in the onslaught; the temple where the soldiers had assembled, was stormed after a two days' siege. The victorious enemy met Petilius Cerialis, commander of the ninth legion, as he was coming to the rescue, routed his troops, and destroyed all his infantry. Cerialis escaped with some cavalry into the camp, and was saved by its fortifications. Alarmed by this disaster and by the fury of the province which he had goaded into war by his rapacity, the procurator Catus crossed over into Gaul.

Suetonius, however, with wonderful resolution, marched amidst a hostile population to Londinium, which, though undistinguished by the name of a colony, was much frequented by a number of merchants and trading vessels. Uncertain whether he should choose it as a seat of war, as he looked round on his scanty force of soldiers, and remembered with what a serious warning the rashness of Petilius had been punished, he resolved to save the province at the cost of a single town. Nor did the tears and weeping of the people, as they implored his aid, deter him from giving the signal of departure and receiving into his army all who would go with him. Those who were chained to the spot by the weakness of their sex, or the infirmity of age, or the attractions of the place, were cut off by the enemy. Like ruin fell on the town of Verulamium, for the barbarians, who delighted in plunder and were indifferent to all else, passed by the fortresses with military garrisons, and attacked whatever offered most wealth to the spoiler, and was unsafe for defence. About seventy thousand citizens and allies, it appeared, fell in the places which I have mentioned. For it was not on making prisoners and selling them, or on any of the barter of war, that the enemy was bent, but on slaughter, on the gibbet, the fire and the cross, like men soon about to pay the penalty, and meanwhile snatching at instant vengeance.

Suetonius had the fourteenth legion with the veterans of the twentieth, and auxiliaries from the neighbourhood, to the number of about ten thousand armed men, when he prepared to break off delay and fight a battle. He chose a position approached by a narrow defile, closed in at the rear by a forest, having first ascertained that there was not a soldier of the enemy except in his front, where an open plain extended without any danger from ambuscades. His legions were in close array; round them, the light-armed troops, and the cavalry in dense array on the wings. On the other side, the army of the Britons, with its masses of infantry and cavalry, was confidently exulting, a vaster host than ever had assembled, and so fierce in spirit that they actually brought with them, to witness the victory, their wives riding in waggons, which they had placed on the extreme border of the plain.

Boudicea, with her daughters before her in a chariot, went up to tribe after tribe, protesting that it was indeed usual for Britons to fight under the leadership of women. "But now," she said, "it is not as a woman descended from noble ancestry, but as one of the people that I am avenging lost freedom, my scourged body, the outraged chastity of my daughters. Roman lust has gone so far that not our very persons, nor even age or virginity, are left unpolluted. But heaven is on the side of a righteous vengeance; a legion which dared to fight has perished; the rest are hiding themselves in their camp, or are thinking anxiously of flight. They will not sustain even the din and the shout of so many thousands, much less our charge and our blows. If you weigh well the strength of the armies, and the causes of the war, you will see that in this battle you must conquer or die. This is a woman's resolve; as for men, they may live and be slaves."

Nor was Suetonius silent at such a crisis. Though he confided in the valour of his men, he yet mingled encouragements and entreaties to disdain the clamours and empty threats of the barbarians. "There," he said, "you see more women than warriors. Unwarlike, unarmed, they will give way the moment they have recognised that sword and that courage of their conquerors, which have so often routed them. Even among many legions, it is a few who really decide the battle, and it will enhance their glory that a small force should earn the renown of an entire army. Only close up the ranks, and having discharged your javelins, then with shields and swords continue the work of bloodshed and destruction, without a thought of plunder. When once the victory has been won, everything will be in your power."

Such was the enthusiasm which followed the general's address, and so promptly did the veteran soldiery, with their long experience of battles, prepare for the hurling of the javelins, that it was with confidence in the result that Suetonius gave the signal of battle.

At first, the legion kept its position, clinging to the narrow defile as a defence; when they had exhausted their missiles, which they discharged with unerring aim on the closely approaching foe, they rushed out in a wedge-like column. Similar was the onset of the auxiliaries, while the cavalry with extended lances broke through all who offered a strong resistance. The rest turned their back in flight, and flight proved difficult, because the surrounding waggons had blocked retreat. Our soldiers spared not to slay even the women, while the very beasts of burden, transfixed by the missiles, swelled the piles of bodies. Great glory, equal to that of our old victories, was won on that day. Some indeed say that there fell little less than eighty thousand of the Britons, with a loss to our soldiers of about four hundred, and only as many wounded. Boudicea put an end to her life by poison. Poenius Postumus too, camp-prefect of the second legion, when he knew of the success of the men of the fourteenth and twentieth, feeling that he had cheated his legion out of like glory, and had contrary to all military usage disregarded the general's orders, threw himself on his sword.

The whole army was then brought together and kept under canvas to finish the remainder of the war. The emperor strengthened the forces by sending from Germany two thousand legionaries, eight cohorts of auxiliaries, and a thousand cavalry. On their arrival the men of the ninth had their number made up with legionary soldiers. The allied infantry and cavalry were placed in new winter quarters, and whatever tribes still wavered or were hostile were ravaged with fire and sword. Nothing however distressed the enemy so much as famine, for they had been careless about sowing corn, people of every age having gone to the war, while they reckoned on our supplies as their own. Nations, too, so high-spirited inclined the more slowly to peace, because Julius Classicanus, who had been sent as successor to Catus and was at variance with Suetonius, let private animosities interfere with the public interest, and had spread an idea that they ought to wait for a new governor who, having neither the anger of an enemy nor the pride of a conqueror, would deal mercifully with those who had surrendered. At the same time he stated in a despatch to Rome that no cessation of fighting must be expected, unless Suetonius were superseded, attributing that general's disasters to perverseness and his successes to good luck.

Accordingly one of the imperial freedmen, Polyclitus, was sent to survey the state of Britain, Nero having great hopes that his influence would be able not only to establish a good understanding between the governor and the pro-curator, but also to pacify the rebellious spirit of the barbarians. And Polyclitus, who with his enormous suite had been a burden to Italy and Gaul, failed not, as soon as he had crossed the ocean, to make his progresses a terror even to our soldiers. But to the enemy he was a laughing-stock, for they still retained some of the fire of liberty, knowing nothing yet of the power of freedmen, and so they marvelled to see a general and an army who had finished such a war cringing to slaves. Everything, however, was softened down for the emperor's ears, and Suetonius was retained in the government; but as he subsequently lost a few vessels on the shore with the crews, he was ordered, as though the war continued, to hand over his army to Petronius Turpilianus, who had just resigned his consulship. Petronius neither challenged the enemy nor was himself molested, and veiled this tame inaction under the honourable name of peace.
"

(1) 61 Publius Petronius Turpilianus, Lucius (Ionius) Caesennius Paetus see AE 1978, 0121

George Shipway had the above as the "bare bones" for his plot line and has skillfully woven his novel "Imperial Governor" around it.

Vale

M. Spedius Corbulo
[Image: spedius-mcmxliii.gif]
~~~~~~Jim Poulton~~~~~~
North London Wargames Group
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#30
Quote:AFAIK the only ancient author who covered our period of interest was Cornelius Tacitus.
Well, strictly speaking more authors covered that period (i.e. Dio, Suetonius), but they either did not pay attention or it did not survive.

Anyways, here's another scan by Jim posted by request:
Boudicca and her daughters, as portrayed in the Civic Hall, Cardiff.
Greets!

Jasper Oorthuys
Webmaster & Editor, Ancient Warfare magazine
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