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Greek footwear
#31
A boot with a fur lining can still chafe bare skin at the top. Turning the fur over the boot would prevent this. It could be that the best way to cut the skin for boots brings those odd lappets to the top and the makers thought, "Oh, that looks cool - and it will stop the boot chafing - serendippity!" (Just a wild guess-I firmly believe that many more things are the result of happy chance than of genius - though geniuses, who work hard, tend to get lucky more often than others!)
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#32
Both above mentioned interpretations make sense. I see a twofold purpose, being protective and decorative.

If you consider the protective part, it is only the 'inner' flap that gives protection to the calf. A boot with one flap on one side, whereas the other having none, would just look silly. The other flaps would therefore be added for decorative purposes.

[size=75:zgb4o5h4]By the way, I like the word 'serendipity'; there's quite an interesting story behind it.[/size]
[size=75:wtt9v943]Susanne Arvidsson

I have not spent months gathering Hoplites from the four corners of the earth just to let
some Swedish pancake in a purloined panoply lop their lower limbs off!
- Paul Allen, Thespian
[/size]

[Image: partofE448.jpg]
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#33
Greetings,
I have seen something very similar to those boots in a fashion shop too........for ladies of course... Big Grin
Damnit, I think it was in London......
and I turned down those Thracian style boots, because they had heels...... :x
Arthes will be hunting in the shoe shops tomorrow........ for the latest in Ancient fashion footware
:wink:
regards
Arthes
Cristina
The Hoplite Association
[url:n2diviuq]http://www.hoplites.org[/url]
The enemy is less likely to get wind of an advance of cavalry, if the orders for march were passed from mouth to mouth rather than announced by voice of herald, or public notice. Xenophon
-
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#34
Well Cristina,
if you can't find them in London.
Sent you messurements to master Nikos and have them made for you!
Kind regards
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#35
There are some really fancy little boots being worn by Medusa here.....
[Image: medpeg.gif]
The image is from Syracuse, but it is not the first time I have noticed art from this period that looks similar to the Mayan or Aztec. (er.. circa 620-610 bce)
regards
Arthes
Cristina
The Hoplite Association
[url:n2diviuq]http://www.hoplites.org[/url]
The enemy is less likely to get wind of an advance of cavalry, if the orders for march were passed from mouth to mouth rather than announced by voice of herald, or public notice. Xenophon
-
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#36
My friends speculate that this is a variation of the "Attic" boots.
Guess that if they are soft leather you can wear grieves over them.
Kind regards
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#37
An image with an example of Beotian boots
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#38
And another example.
Kind regards
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#39
So if I wanted to make some Boetians... Is the pattern the same as the Thracian, just shorter? Or is it in strips or wound up above the ankle?

Also, I presume you would not wear any of these with greaves. So what would you wear?

Gaius Decius Aqilius
(Ralph Izard)
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#40
Khaire,
the bottom one look like they have wedge heels or is that simply the stripey design...or straps around the back of the heel..?
regards
Arthes
Cristina
The Hoplite Association
[url:n2diviuq]http://www.hoplites.org[/url]
The enemy is less likely to get wind of an advance of cavalry, if the orders for march were passed from mouth to mouth rather than announced by voice of herald, or public notice. Xenophon
-
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#41
My friends speculate that the first image boods have stripes to be tighten over the calf. The second image with Oidepus are the real "traveling - campaign" boots that the Beotians used.
Whell most pottery shows "Beotian" shorter than "Thracian".
Pottery shows a tight fitting "soft leater" version that might fit with grieves.
I belive that possibly "Kalithea style" grieves were worn over boots.
I plan to test wering various style grieves over my "Thracian" boots at Watford.
Kind regards
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#42
Am I the only one who looks at this picture(Oedipus)and sees
sandals? The strap around the heel and lacing around the calves looks like sandals to me.
I guess they could be boots but I don't see it. :? sorry.
Andy Booker

Gaivs Antonivs Satvrninvs

Andronikos of Athens
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#43
Unfortunately, I'm going to have to go with Andy and they look like sandals to me also. Admittedly they look sturdier and more fit for traveling, running, etc. than simple thong sandals, but they still look like sandals to me.

Cheers,
Adam C.
Gaius Opius Fugi (Adam Cripps)
Moderator, Roman Army Talkv2
Forum Rules: http://www.ancient-warfare.org/index.php...view=rules
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#44
Quote:What about colored thracian boots? I would like to have myne black or white & not lacing as this pic & osprey shows them, but you tie it them at the top of the flaps, as can be seen at right fromthe god....

I may fall if I run through the grass, because I wouldn't put heels on my boots...

[Image: img321.jpg]

Try fixing additional bands of leather on the soles, not as thick as heeling leather, it gives a bit more grip. But I think there's evidence for hobnails on military boots, isn't there?
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#45
Homer and Pindaros talk about the "red-shoed Orchomenians".
Leather colouring was known from the Bronze age!
I will try to find more imges of Beotian boots.
Kind regards
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