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Worcestershire Sauce = Garum ???
#61
That's true, and the point. The most British people in the 18th and 19th century had no durned idea what real Indian curry and seasoning was like, since they'd never been to India before (that was only a small part of the population). So they had to rely on second-hand accounts and the fact that they lacked a lot of the ingredients that were really used... so they often made stuff that they THOUGHT was right. We are spoiled now because of all the good Indian food that started to appear in the late 20th century.
-Christy Beall
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#62
O.K.......you have a point... your theory is plausible ( just !! )

I am not entirely persuaded, though.....
"dulce et decorum est pro patria mori " - Horace, ODES
(It is a sweet and proper thing to die for ones country)

"No son-of-a-bitch ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country" -GeorgeC Scott as General George S. Patton
Paullus Scipio/Paul McDonnell-Staff
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#63
http://www.foodhistory.com/foodnotes/le ... rshire/01/

Imitation Worcestershire Sauce

* 3 teaspoonfuls cayenne pepper.
* 2 tablespoonfuls walnut or tomato catsup (strained through muslin).
* 3 shallots minced fine.
* 3 anchovies chopped into bits.
* 1 quart of vinegar.
* Half-teaspoonful powdered cloves.

Mix and rub through a sieve. Put in a stone jar, set in a pot of boiling water, and heat until the liquid is so hot you can not bear your finger in it. Strain, and let it stand in the jar, closely covered, two days, then bottle for use.

"Davidson has noted that an "authentic" garum was advertised in a 19th-century British cookery book, The Household Manager (1868), though the lack of any later references elsewhere suggests the venture was not a great success. Some kindred products survive in the Mediterranean, for instance, peï salat."

http://everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=244808

The stuff not selling probably means it was the real deal. :wink:
TARBICvS/Jim Bowers
A A A DESEDO DESEDO!
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#64
O.K. - since Tarbicus is brave enough to publish a recipe for "Wooster -shire" sauce, I shall do likewise !
Here is a version of Garum/ liquamen described as "fish pickle", and without the fermentation(from the book I mentioned earlier ) :-
3 ounces , drained and washed canned tuna OR salmon OR unsalted sardines OR unsalted anchovies
1 Tablespoon vinegar
2 teaspoons white wine
1/2 teaspoon mustard seed
1/2 teaspoon oregano
1/2 teaspoon lovage OR celery seed
1 Tablespoon olive oil
1/2 teaspoon honey
pinch fresh Basil
1/4 teaspoon thyme
1 mint leaf, chopped

Mix in a bowl, thoroughly combining all ingredients - allow to stand for an hour or two to blend flavours - may be stored in a sealed jar for up to 2 weeks in fridge.

To my mind, while this produces a reasonable seasoning/relish, because it's not fermented it does not reproduce the characteristics of Garum - if using where garum is called for as an ingredient I would stick with an Asian fish sauce.
BTW Christy, I see from earlier in the thread that "worcester shire sauce" pre-dates Lea and Perrins......... origin urban myth therefore ?
-
"dulce et decorum est pro patria mori " - Horace, ODES
(It is a sweet and proper thing to die for ones country)

"No son-of-a-bitch ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country" -GeorgeC Scott as General George S. Patton
Paullus Scipio/Paul McDonnell-Staff
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#65
Has anyone considered an anchovy paste available in the UK: Patum Pepperium (known as, wait for it...'Gentleman's Relish')?

It is of a thicker consistency than Worcester Sauce, and definitely fishier, but quite good once you have acquired the taste.
Lochinvar/Ewan Carmichael
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#66
And some Google links for Patum Pepperium and Patum Peperium (there seem to be two spellings):

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q= ... CcountryGB

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q= ... CcountryGB

Yum. Must try, nice one.
TARBICvS/Jim Bowers
A A A DESEDO DESEDO!
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#67
Dear Jim,
I think your spelling 'Peperium' may be more accurate (I was away from my larder).
Also, my spelling of 'available' wasn't that hot either (I shall edit it now).
Mea culpa!!

If you haven't tried it before, apply a small quantity to hot buttered toast.
Lochinvar/Ewan Carmichael
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#68
Quote:Dear Jim,
I think your spelling 'Peperium' may be more accurate (I was away from my larder).
Also, my spelling of 'available' wasn't that hot either (I shall edit it now).
Mea culpa!!

If you haven't tried it before, apply a small quantity to hot buttered toast.
Ewan, no problemo with the spelling - there definitely seem to be two!

There's a fantastic recipe on one of the Google links for Patum Peperium with chopped eggs and toast Big Grin
http://www.breakfastandbrunch.com/recipes2.php?rcpid=81

Interesting it should have a latin name as well.
TARBICvS/Jim Bowers
A A A DESEDO DESEDO!
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#69
Dear Jim,
Forget the Patum! I'm more impressed by your idea of a good take-way. Even better if you buy enough for sufficient left-overs to construct a 'breakfast of champions'!! :lol:
Lochinvar/Ewan Carmichael
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