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Worcestershire Sauce = Garum ???
#46
Antoninus,
Try to find a Vietnamese or Thai restaurant here, in Bilbao... :?
They will eventually come, but Basques are very conservative about eating!

Aitor
It\'s all an accident, an accident of hands. Mine, others, all without mind, from one extreme to another, but neither works nor will ever.

Rolf Steiner
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#47
Have you tried Irun/Hendaye? I am sure there is at least one chinese take out in Hendaye.
And I suggest that Bilbao applies to the Guinesss book of records for being the only city left in the world where there are no asiatic restaurants... Big Grin
Pascal Sabas
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#48
Quote:And I suggest that Bilbao applies to the Guinesss book of records for being the only city left in the world where there are no asiatic restaurants... Very Happy

They don't know what they're missing - chicken foo yung, boiled rice, chips, and curry sauce over the whole lot - the mountain of power!! :twisted:
TARBICvS/Jim Bowers
A A A DESEDO DESEDO!
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#49
No, no, I wasn't meaning ANY Asiatic restaurants! :o
We have plenty of Chinese ones and even some Hindi or Pakistanian ones, I was specifically referring to Thai and Vietnamese restaurants, those which can use Thai fish sauce or Nuoc Mam for cooking... :?

Aitor
It\'s all an accident, an accident of hands. Mine, others, all without mind, from one extreme to another, but neither works nor will ever.

Rolf Steiner
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#50
Ah, but Aitor, I still bet they don't know what they're missing - chicken foo yung, boiled rice, chips, and curry sauce over the whole lot - the mountain of power!! :twisted: Smile

yum yum
TARBICvS/Jim Bowers
A A A DESEDO DESEDO!
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#51
All of the Nuac Mam I've found is made with anchovies.
I think this lends it a slightly anchovy taste.
I recently found a Philippine version made with mackerel.
I bought a case, untasted.
It's pretty good.
Yum.
>|P. Dominus Antonius|<
Leg XX VV
Tony Dah m

Oderint dum metuant - Cicero
Si vis pacem, para bellum - Vegetius
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#52
Well, I thought I would report my "tastings" to everyone...I know it isn't a Roman dish, but since the Romans ate garum on many things as a condiment, tonight for dinner I cooked what is known down here as "Hobo Burgers" in the oven (it is a hamburger patty with a slice of potato, onion, and carrots wrapped in tin foil and then baked in the oven), and tried some fish sauce (our modern equivalent of garum) on it. This is the first time I have actually eaten any of the stuff on food, and I was a bit nervous about trying it because it smells rather fishy, but I went ahead and put some on the burger and potatos, and WOW! I was really pleasantly surprised...it is very GOOD...quite delicious. It really compliments the flavor of beef and vegetables, and although it smells fishy, the flavor is very subtle when applied to a food dish. No wonder the Romans liked the stuff so much. I think garum might have gotten a bit of a bad reputation probably from its manufacturing process, but the end result is very good, and shouldn't be knocked until tried! A bottle of it will be included in my kit bag from now on! Big Grin
Lucius Aurelius Metellus
a.k.a. Jeffrey L. Greene
MODERATOR
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#53
Quote:A bottle of it [garum] will be included in my kit bag from now on! Big Grin

I agree. I'm actually getting a mini-amphora bottle for my kit bag. As a quicky I also like it in cheese quesadillas.
>|P. Dominus Antonius|<
Leg XX VV
Tony Dah m

Oderint dum metuant - Cicero
Si vis pacem, para bellum - Vegetius
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#54
Yep, that's what I did, too. I had my garum amphora made by Julia from the Venetian Cat studio. Big Grin
Lucius Aurelius Metellus
a.k.a. Jeffrey L. Greene
MODERATOR
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#55
I found that if I use the Thai fish sauce in salad dressing it gives the sald a very good taste. I usually mix it with basalmic vinegar and Italian seasoning.
"...quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit, occidentis telum est."


a.k.a. Paul M.
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#56
This thread has made me laugh out loud !!
I grew up with both worcester sauce ( British heritage ) and Nam pla - I would suggest that the latter is as close to Garum as one could get ready-made.
I would suggest treating it as a condiment/ ingredient, rather than a sauce. It is used all over S.E. Asia, mainly as an ingredient in cooking -- it adds a great flavour, and is never"fishy" or unpleasant, and many recipes from Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Phillipines etc include it in various forms and guises. It is also used, suitably mixed/diluted as a dipping sauce.

Robert, if you have ever eaten rijstafel or at an Indonesian restaurant, you have eaten Fish Sauce !!
"dulce et decorum est pro patria mori " - Horace, ODES
(It is a sweet and proper thing to die for ones country)

"No son-of-a-bitch ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country" -GeorgeC Scott as General George S. Patton
Paullus Scipio/Paul McDonnell-Staff
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#57
I'd go with Chinese or Thai or Vietnamese fish sauce personally. Yea, you can use anchovies, but do you really want to ferment them and see what happens? :? I suspect the oriental varieties are made in very much the same way. Worstershire sauce is going to be WAY off. I actually read about how it got started in a academic book on the influence of colonialism on Indian cooking-- It started out as an 19th century attempt by the British to make a copy of an Indian curry sauce, since sudo-Indian cooking was very much in vogue at the time. All the curry powders and sauces that were being produced in England were anything but authentic, but then how did most English people know that?

The part about Worstershire being a happy accident is still true-- some start-up business types were trying to make their own curry sauce, but having tasted the stuff realized it was terrible. It was subsequently forgotten in a basement and rediscovered later, only to find that it now tasted very good (not especially Indian, but good), and began selling the stuff all over.
-Christy Beall
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#58
You know, this story about the origins of 'Wooster' has all the hallmarks of an 'urban myth'........................
"dulce et decorum est pro patria mori " - Horace, ODES
(It is a sweet and proper thing to die for ones country)

"No son-of-a-bitch ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country" -GeorgeC Scott as General George S. Patton
Paullus Scipio/Paul McDonnell-Staff
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#59
I suppose no one can really say if the "happy accident" part is without doubt true, but it seems to remain the company's official story. Of course, such stories are great at making your product more exciting. On the other hand, food preparation often involves a lot of surprises and accidents, some of which work and many, many more that aren't so great. :lol:
-Christy Beall
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#60
Just one little thing.......( as detective Colombo used to say on T.V.)

The ingredients of Indian Curry, of whatever sort, bear no resemblance whatever to the ingredients of Wooster sauce.......!!!!
"dulce et decorum est pro patria mori " - Horace, ODES
(It is a sweet and proper thing to die for ones country)

"No son-of-a-bitch ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country" -GeorgeC Scott as General George S. Patton
Paullus Scipio/Paul McDonnell-Staff
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