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Robin Hood's Roman Ancestors ?
#1
Hooded cloaks
http://books.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/propyl...g/book/271

Greez & All The Best for 2018

Simplex
Siggi K.
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#2
Simplex,

The opening page looks very interesting but all the attachments are in German (I think). Is there an English translation of the fourteen attachments?
Thanks for sharing.
AKA Tom Chelmowski

Historiae Eruditere (if that is proper Latin)
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#3
(01-07-2018, 03:28 PM)Lothia Wrote: Simplex,

The opening page looks very interesting but all the attachments are in German (I think).  Is there an English translation of the fourteen attachments?
Thanks for sharing.

Hi,
...I'm afraid not. Rolleyes
I must have mixed the extent in English with another paper I uploaded a minute before.
Can't recall, though, which one.
My excuses.
Seems 2018 started off as 2017 had finished.
I'm really concerned of my (lost ?) ability to properly focus on things. Blush

Greez

Siggi
Siggi K.
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#4
Putting my little German to test, it seems that the paper concentrates on the social aspects of the use of the BIRRVS, SAGVM, LACERNA and PAENVLA rather than being a classification or history of the garments -- taking the subtitle as an example, ''Gebrauch'' indicates use, ''Bedeutung'' significance, ''Habitus'' is a sociological concept somewhere between habit and the frame of mind formed by a particular circumstance or thing (e.g. the toga, ''Romanness'', dignitas and pietas)

In her summary, Frau Zerres states that she will focus on a little-explored aspect, the hooded cloak's role in societal communication, whether there existed a class for whom the hooded cloak was a defining garment, if different social groups used different forms, in what situations they were worn and what social cues or messages were intrinsic in the wearing of the hooded cloak (cf. the association of the BRACCAE as a barbarian garment or the Emperor Tiberius, whose Greek dress on Rhodes (pallium and slippers) was understood as foreshadowing his life of depravity on Capri -- to be ''palliatus'' was to be Greek, to reject the toga, the garment of the ''Romanos, rerum dominos, gentemque togatam'' and so to reject the Roman virtues -- austerity, virility, duty, piety)

I should take some weeks to read the German text in full, but I would advise anyone tackling it to read first (I only have access to the older monographs) Wilson's ''The clothing of the ancient Romans'' or the relevant articles in Smith's Dictionary of Classical Antiquity, or any other suitable source, to become well acquainted with the ''conventional questions of archaeological analysis: typology, chronology, material and distribution''.
Patrick J. Gray

'' Now. Close your eyes. It's but a short step to the boat, a short pull across the river.''
''And then?''
''And then, I promise you, you'll dream a different story altogether''

From ''I, Claudius'', by J. Pulman after R. Graves.
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#5
Great link!
Copied to the FB page.
Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR
FECTIO Late Romans
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
[Image: artgroepbutton.jpg]
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#6
Regarding hooded cloaks, I was reading a little today and have some information, and a little vignette of a small domestic mishap, on the subject of hoods in the time of the poet Martial that might interest the reader (M. Valerius Martialis, c. 38 C.E. - 104 C.E.)

There is a plate in the ubiquitous Wilson, my standard reference for Roman clothing, showing the LACERNA or rain-cloak worn with the separate CVCVLLVS (which was indeed a separate garment, consisting of what we would call a shoulder-cape and hood, not an addendum to the LACERNA)

The reason I bring up Martial is on account of Epigram No. 139 of Book Fourteen, on a Liburnian hood, which runs:

ivngere nescisti nobis, o stvlte, lacernas:
indveras albvs, exve callainas

Or, in the translation of Walter C.A. Kerr

You have not known, o foolish fellow, how to match your mantle with me:
You put it on white, now take it off green.

Callainas comes from callais, a stone which Pliny describes as sea-green. Evidently [for by a literary conceit, the Liburnian hood is speaking] the rain has caused the dyed hood to run and stain the mantle -- had he known better, he would have ''matched [his] mantle with [his hood]'' and avoided this disaster. The point of this is twofold -- first, that mantle and hood are at least sometimes separate garments, and second the intrinsic value of a little headache of daily life in the Rome of Domitian, incisively recorded and so ''preserved'' as it were in aspic for remote posterity.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1uDS3qPl...sp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/19hNWEpQ...sp=sharing

Liburnia is the Illyrian coast.
Patrick J. Gray

'' Now. Close your eyes. It's but a short step to the boat, a short pull across the river.''
''And then?''
''And then, I promise you, you'll dream a different story altogether''

From ''I, Claudius'', by J. Pulman after R. Graves.
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