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Legion near Judea at time of Jesus
#31
What I meant was that since it was made up of Italians, would the cohort be senior to the other auxiliary cohorts.

As for vexillations I heard that Pilate requested legion troops frequently so to pacify him, Tiberius authorized a cohort of Italians.

I have also heard that this cohort was attached to the 10th legion.
James Ajiduah
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#32
Interesting topic. The forces stationed at the further reaches of the empire have always held a fascination for me.
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#33
Quote:As for vexillations I heard that Pilate requested legion troops frequently so to pacify him, Tiberius authorized a cohort of Italians.
It's a while since I looked into Pilate's governorship, so I am open to correction, as always. However, our principal sources are Josephus and Philo and I do not believe that either of them says anything about this.
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#34
So what strength would be the force that the governor took from Caesarea to Jerusalem? Certainly there would have to be more cohorts in Caesarea for the govenor's security.
James Ajiduah
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#35
So what strength would be the force that the governor took from Caesarea to Jerusalem? Certainly there would have to be more cohorts in Caesarea for the governor's security.
James Ajiduah
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#36
What I was saying was that it could be a possibility.
James Ajiduah
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#37
Not to disrupt this thread, but there's the gospel according to Matthew (chapter 8) where Jesus cures the centurion's servant.
The Faith of the Centurion

5 When Jesus had entered Capernaum, a centurion came to him, asking for help. 6 “Lord,” he said, “my servant lies at home paralyzed, suffering terribly.”

7 Jesus said to him, “Shall I come and heal him?”

8 The centurion replied, “Lord, I do not deserve to have you come under my roof. But just say the word, and my servant will be healed. 9 For I myself am a man under authority, with soldiers under me. I tell this one, ‘Go,’ and he goes; and that one, ‘Come,’ and he comes. I say to my servant, ‘Do this,’ and he does it.”

10 When Jesus heard this, he was amazed and said to those following him, “Truly I tell you, I have not found anyone in Israel with such great faith. 11 I say to you that many will come from the east and the west, and will take their places at the feast with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven. 12 But the subjects of the kingdom will be thrown outside, into the darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.”

13 Then Jesus said to the centurion, “Go! Let it be done just as you believed it would.” And his servant was healed at that moment.
thread, but there is the gospel according to Matthew chapter 8. Where Jesus cures the centurion's servant.
To what Legion would this centurion have belonged? It would have been from the same time frame you're discussing.

Salve Sis,
Thomas
Thomas Guenther
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#38
Centurion was a rank, one did not have to be a legionnaire to be a Centurion. They were in the Auxilia too.
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#39
What I'm asking then is what legion or auxilia did this centurion belong? I was hoping that it may help identify what military unit was stationed there?

Peace,
Thomas
Thomas Guenther
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#40
Because Jesus's time wasn't a prominent thing, as the Catholic church makes it out to be, like a lot of other things that took place in the empire. Think about this realistically. The Catholic church makes the crucifixion of Jesus to be a major affair. When in actuality there probably weren't very many people at Jesus's crucifixion. To the romans he was probably just another trouble maker and upstart. Just another problem that needed to be stamped out. There isn't a whole lot of information on this topic of the military there at this time , because there wasn't nothing major going on. I mean, it's not like the invasion of Britain or the wars in Germania! And everything always refers to Pilates troops, etc. Its hard to find anything identifying the military unit present there. Just a thought, but perhaps all Pilate had there was some auxilia and his own guard. And maybe this centurion belong to one of them? Auxilia or his guard? I say, the province of Judea appears to be not as volatile at this time as other areas of the empire so why would he need any more military than that. Just trying to help.
Thomas Guenther
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#41
Quote:what legion or auxilia did this centurion belong?

I think we can gather from the accounts in Matthew and Luke that the centurion lived in the town: he had links with the community elders and had paid to have a synogogue built. He also seems to have spoken Aramaic. So he was probably a local man originally, and perhaps was centurion of one of the locally-raised auxiliary cohorts (maybe the Cohors Sebastanorum mentioned above?).

My guess would be that he was either stationed in the town for some reason (individual soldiers or small groups were sometimes detached to towns and villages for various purposes, but in this case he must have been there for quite a long time), or he had retired from the army and settled at Capernaeum. At a push he could have been a retired legionary officer, but as there seem to have been few if any legionary troops in the vicinity I'd say it would have been unlikely for one to be drawn to live in such an isolated place.
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#42
The centurion was probably under Herod in detached duty. Nathan Ross here suggests that he probably was retired. This is a highly likely possibility since Roman soldiers received land and a retirement pension. This centurion's land could have been in Capernaum.
James Ajiduah
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#43
There were NO Roman troops in Galilee at that time. Herod Antipas was the tetrach of Galilee, and probably had his own troops. Since this was peacetime Judea, I don't see why there would be any need for Roman troops. (We're talking 30 A.D. at most here not 70 A.D.)
James Ajiduah
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#44
Quote: And everything always refers to Pilates troops, etc. Its hard to find anything identifying the military unit present there. Just a thought, but perhaps all Pilate had there was some auxilia and his own guard. And maybe this centurion belong to one of them? Auxilia or his guard? I say, the province of Judea appears to be not as volatile at this time as other areas of the empire so why would he need any more military than that. Just trying to help.

The Samaritan troops were pretty undisciplined, disregarding Pilate's order to use clubs and whips to disperse the crowd in a demonstration. So I think Pilate would be BEGGING for legion troops.

Also there was the issue of an insurrection caused by Barabbas. I think a vexillation from the nearest legion, (the 10th Fretensis in Antioch or the 12th Fulminata in Raphanea) would have gone to Judea.
James Ajiduah
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#45
Ajiduah,

You make a good point. I had forgotten about Barabbas. Thanks for reminding me.

Thomas
Thomas Guenther
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