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Phyrigian cap.
#1
I have just purchased and am waiting for my Galic helmet. It will have a sewn in cover inside already but I was wondering if I could get hold of a phyrigian cap, as I have been advised of their suitability and preference to the sewn in to the helmet variety.
I have no knowledge of how to take one myself. What`s the best way of getting one and taking into account that I have little hair left on my head, so I guess a small to medium size would be best?

Thanks for any advise.

Geoff.
Geoff
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#2
The easyest way is make it yourself. get woolfelt and measure your skull. then sew it together. this also the way romans would have done it. take a tape measure and measure yuor skull diameter and make shure the halfes are big enough to go over your haed . Make a paper version first !!!!


[attachment=12518]hat.pdf[/attachment]


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AgrimensorLVCIVS FLAVIVS SINISTER
aka Jos Cremers
member of CORBVLO
ESTE NIX PAX CRISTE NIX
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#3
Agrimensor.

Was there a particular colour or colours that the legionaries tended to go for?

Thanks for advise.
Geoff.
Geoff
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#4
How popular were the Phyrigian caps among the Romans during the Republican period?
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#5
I don't think it already spread to Rome by then.
Kis György Márk (by western standards, György Márk Kis)

Legio Leonum Valentiniani

http://www.legioleonum.hu
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#6
Roman freedman wore a cap, as part of their manumission. I'm just wondering if it was common for regular citizens, even soldiers, to also wear them.
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#7
If my cack handedness, fails me in making one of my own, to go under my galic helmet, would the group have one or might there be a website to get hold of one?

Ta, very much thanks.

Geoff.
Geoff
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#8
There is not a great deal of information as to what soldiers wore under their helmets. Naturally most Roman art will not show anything and there is next to nothing in written sources. Archeologically there are a few complete examples of hats some of which are types which do not appear in the pictorial sources. Some of them may have been used under helmets. It was probably up to the individual as to what they found most comfortable

Hats do not appear frequently in Roman art anyway but several types are known including the Phrygian. The most popular hat to judge by art was the later type called the 'Tetrarchic' cap or Pannonian. That is the 'pill box' hat favoured by late Roman re-enactors. What is surprising is that an example of such a hat was found in Egypt and is dated to Hadrianic times, well before it appears in art.

There is another wool hat which appears to be suitable for wearing under a helmet as it even has cheek pieces! However that would be more complex to make.

If you want to buy a hat rather than make one you could try http://www.medievaldesign.com/english.asp

I have found them to be very helpful.

Hope this helps

Graham.
"Is all that we see or seem but a dream within a dream" Edgar Allan Poe.

"Every brush-stroke is torn from my body" The Rebel, Tony Hancock.

"..I sweated in that damn dirty armor....TWENTY YEARS!', Charlton Heston, The Warlord.
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#9
Quote:There is another wool hat which appears to be suitable for wearing under a helmet as it even has cheek pieces! However that would be more complex to make.

If you mean the example from Dura, Jeffrey Hildebrandt made one in the exact way the Dura example was made, and he said it was quite difficult.
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#10
Graham.

Thank you for the information. I`m learning all the time here and very interesting. I`ll have a look at the link.

Geoff.
Geoff
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#11
Hi Evan

The cap I mean is the wool type from Dydimoi in Egypt. I always thought the Dura one looked rather bulky to fit under a helmet. The Dydimoi version is rounder, has extra padding at the brow and as I said even has cheek pieces.

There is a photo of it on the back cover of my book.

Geoff, we are all still learning! Confusedmile: Welcome to the club!

Graham.
"Is all that we see or seem but a dream within a dream" Edgar Allan Poe.

"Every brush-stroke is torn from my body" The Rebel, Tony Hancock.

"..I sweated in that damn dirty armor....TWENTY YEARS!', Charlton Heston, The Warlord.
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