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Arch of Titus remains found
#1
http://www.ansa.it/english/news/lifestyl...58955.html

arrivederci,
Emilio
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#2
Sorry, but this arch was already known for a very long time. What was uncovered was part of the honorary arch. the triumphal arch (of which there is only one for Titus) is another and of course also long-since known.
Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR
FECTIO Late Romans
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
[Image: artgroepbutton.jpg]
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#3
Quote:Sorry, but this arch was already known for a very long time...

Hi, Robert

The "Arch of Titus in Circus" was erected in 80/81 A.D. by the senate in honour of the emperor Titus, and to commemorate the capture of Jerusalem.

The most important information about this arch is contained in the inscription (CIL, VI, 944) preserved in the "Einsiedeln Itinerary" and reported to have been found in the Circus Maximus.

The arch is also shown in a fragment of the "Forma Urbis Romae".

The ruins of the arch were incorporated by medieval buildings, but were still visible in the sixteenth century ( E. Duperac, "I vestigi di Roma", 1575).

Today those ruins have been brought to light.

arrivederci,
Emilio

[attachment=12414]circo1.jpg[/attachment]

[attachment=12415]circo2.jpg[/attachment]

[attachment=12416]circo3.jpg[/attachment]


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#4
Quote: ...What was uncovered was part of the honorary arch. the triumphal arch (of which there is only one for Titus) is another...

@Robert,

The Arch of Titus which still stands today at the end of the Via Sacra next to the Roman Forum, famous for its period depiction of spoils from the capture of Jerusalem in 70 A.D., is an honorific arch commemorating the emperor’s greatest deeds and apotheosis, not a triumphal arch.
Built by his brother Domitian in 82 A.D., the year after Titus’ death and deification, it’s often called a triumphal arch because of the high relief depictions of Roman soldiers carrying the treasures of the Second Temple — the seven-branched Menorah, the silver trumpets, the Table of the Shew Bread — in Titus’ triumphal procession of 71 A.D.

Titus’ real triumphal arch was erected in 81 A.D., the year he died, at the curved east end of the Circus Maximus. The triple arch was explicitly dedicated to Titus’ conquest of Judea and Jerusalem.
A marked contrast with the inscription on the extant arch, the wording on the Circus Maximus arch’s inscription leaves no doubt that it was a genuine triumphal arch:

Senatus populusque Romanus imp(eratori) Tito Ceasari divi Vespasiani f(ilio) Vespasiani Augusto pontif(ici) max(imo), trib(unicia) pot(estate) x, imp(eratori) XVII, [c]o(n)s(uli) VIII, p(atri) p(atriae), principi suo, quod praeceptis patri(is) consiliisq(ue) et auspiciis gentem Iudaeorum domuit et urbem Hierusolymam, omnibus ante se ducibus regibus gentibus aut frustra petitam aut omnino intem(p)tatam, delevit.

The Senate and People of Rome [dedicate this arch] to the Emperor Titus [snip many titles], because by his father’s counsel and good auspices, he conquered the people of Judaea and destroyed the city of Jerusalem, which all of the generals, kings, and peoples before him had either failed to do or even to attempt.

arrivederci,
Emilio
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#5
Quote:@Robert,
The Arch of Titus which still stands today at the end of the Via Sacra next to the Roman Forum, famous for its period depiction of spoils from the capture of Jerusalem in 70 A.D., is an honorific arch commemorating the emperor’s greatest deeds and apotheosis, not a triumphal arch.
You are indeed correct, I mixed them up. :oops:


Quote:The ruins of the arch were incorporated by medieval buildings, but were still visible in the sixteenth century ( E. Duperac, "I vestigi di Roma", 1575).
Today those ruins have been brought to light.
Indeed. So the remains were not 'found' at all (as claimed in many media articles), they were known for a very long time. Some articles even claimed that a second triumphal arch was found (which would be unique) but that's totally false. The correct way to describe this (but no doubt less exiting in the media) would be that parts of a known monument were uncovered.
And not even for the first time because I heard that the forum was already dug up during the times of Mussolini, but in parts covered up afterwards?
Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR
FECTIO Late Romans
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
[Image: artgroepbutton.jpg]
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