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4-5th century tunic idea for a germanic warrior...
#16
Furthermore you could also ask David de Roscoat from France to make your decorations. He did a tunic for me and it's absolutely fabulous.
Here he is on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/officinaindumenti
________________________________________
Jvrjenivs Peregrinvs Magnvs / FEBRVARIVS
A.K.A. Jurjen Draaisma
CORBVLO and Fectio
ALA I BATAVORUM
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#17
Fantastic work that is!!!
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#18
Quote:Atellus (are you spanish?)

Hey,

I am from Bilbao.

Thank you for your words. If you want I can give you some manuals or web references to make your tablet weaving stripes, send me a private message and I send them to you.

The alternatives given by Jvrjenivs are really good. I didn't konw the second one... Are they all handmade? Incredible work Confusedhock: Confusedhock: . Thanks.
Patxi

LEGIO VIIII HISPANA
Asociación Cultural Hispania Romana
http://www.hispaniaromana.es

ATHENEA PROMAKHOS
Asociación de Recreación Histórica “ATHENEA PRÓMAKHOS”
http://www.atheneapromakhos.org
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#19
Yes, my tunic is totally done by hand by David. A true masterpiece.
________________________________________
Jvrjenivs Peregrinvs Magnvs / FEBRVARIVS
A.K.A. Jurjen Draaisma
CORBVLO and Fectio
ALA I BATAVORUM
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#20
Evan wrote

The Coptic Tunic evolved from Roman, not Germanic fashion.

I suspect it was more complicated than that. Traditional Roman tunics with clavi were sleeveless, what we now term Coptic tunics had sleeves, as did Germanic tunics. However Parthian, Palmyrene and Persian tunics also had sleeves and were more decorative than traditional Roman ones.

Both Germanic and Persian fashions were probably influential as they were in close contact with the frontier Imperial armies. Fashions and ideas also spread both ways. The sleeves and tailoring on Coptic tunics could have come via Germanic or Eastern fashions. However while the concept of decoration on clothing was probably an eastern fashion the type of decoration itself on Coptic tunics owes much to classical Roman motifs.

Some of the finds of tunics in Germany have been regarded as being Roman influenced in style or even Roman clothing traded or looted. For instance some experts say the Thorsberg tunic often regarded as classically Germanic may have belonged to a Roman Auxiliary!

Graham.
"Is all that we see or seem but a dream within a dream" Edgar Allan Poe.

"Every brush-stroke is torn from my body" The Rebel, Tony Hancock.

"..I sweated in that damn dirty armor....TWENTY YEARS!', Charlton Heston, The Warlord.
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#21
Quote:You can use tablet-waeve for your clavii. There're several vendors selling tablet weavings per meter.
I've some weaves from Sonja from http://www.die-wollhex.de/index.htm but there're loads of other options.
Armae in france sells loose orbiculi.


Thanks a lot, I was searching just this! Do you know more shops like this?

Atellus, te mando un privado Smile

What design do you think is the most appropiate for me?
Sergio

Historian.

Regnum Barbaricum

Barcino, Tarraconensis, Hispania.
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#22
Great shop ( http://www.die-wollhex.de/index.htm ) and the question as to what would be most appropriate for a 4th/ 5th century Germanic warrior was exactly the question I was going to ask. She has a bewildering and rather wonderful range of choices!
[Image: wip2_r1_c1-1-1.jpg] [Image: Comitatuslogo3.jpg]


aka Paul B, moderator
http://www.romanarmy.net/auxilia.htm
Moderation in all things
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#23
Hey,

Let me introduce you my newest late roman tunic completely finished.


[attachment=8856]CYMERA_20140125_114759.jpg[/attachment]

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[attachment=8861]CYMERA_20131207_190513_2014-01-27.jpg[/attachment]


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Patxi

LEGIO VIIII HISPANA
Asociación Cultural Hispania Romana
http://www.hispaniaromana.es

ATHENEA PROMAKHOS
Asociación de Recreación Histórica “ATHENEA PRÓMAKHOS”
http://www.atheneapromakhos.org
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#24
Wonderful tunic, Patxi! Did you make it yourself?
Virilis / Jyrki Halme
PHILODOX
Moderator
[Image: fectio.png]
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#25
Hey,

Thanks, yes I did it on my own. I took the designs from several coptic tunics and mixed them to do this one. I wanted a particular tunic. If a can, I try to make my own equipment, sometimes I success and sometimes..... :dizzy:

I have another late tunic wich is inspired of one from Piazza Armerina. This is made in linen but I wanted one in wool, so as I had two tunic without sleeves in wool I didn't
wear, I transformed them in one plus two hats: a panonian and a phrygian.

I decided to use the same colors I have in my greek linothorax (red, black and white). I don't have a photo here, sorry.
Patxi

LEGIO VIIII HISPANA
Asociación Cultural Hispania Romana
http://www.hispaniaromana.es

ATHENEA PROMAKHOS
Asociación de Recreación Histórica “ATHENEA PRÓMAKHOS”
http://www.atheneapromakhos.org
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#26
You can also go for a wise choice and keep an undecorated tunic. Both the tunic from Norway and the Thorberg tunic are undecorated: no embroidery, no card woven braids, etc.

Single colored tunics are more and more often depicted on 5th and 6th century iconography. For exemple here on one of the 6th century Ravenna Mosaic:
[Image: arrest_byzan_001.jpg]

I think it's a re-enactorism to always go for something decorated. Of course some tunics (apart from so-called coptic fashion of course) may well have been decorated, but they don't necessarly have to be. And picking the right braid with the right material, colors and pattern can be tricky. With only your single colored tunic you know you will be authentic. Status and wealth can be shown through the quality of the weave, the color itself, etc.

If you want something really nice, go for a cloth dyed with natural dyes such as madder or woad, or at least a chemically dyed cloth that has a close color to natural dyes.
You will find some wool like this here: https://www.naturtuche.de/index.php?cat=c36_Wool.html

Quote:There was a find dated to the 4th century in Scandanavia (very recent in fact, 2012 at least) of a Tunic with Segmentae (squares) and Clavii (stripes).

There are some Tunics with this kind of ornamentation found in Thorsberg-Mose dating to the 5th/6th century and I think some found in the Netherlands as well.

See here for the Lendbreen tunic (Norway, late 3rd-early 4th century):
http://www.academia.edu/4372500/Out_of_t...lennium_AD

http://www.thehistoryblog.com/wp-content...museum.jpg

And the Thorsberg tunic (3rd century):
[Image: 450px-thorsberg_tunic.jpg]

I don't see any form of decoration on them Wink
"O niurt Ambrois ri Frangc ocus Brethan Letha."
"By the strenght of Ambrosius, king of the Franks and the Armorican Bretons."
Lebor Bretnach, Irish manuscript of the Historia Brittonum.
[Image: 955d308995.jpg]
Agraes / Morcant map Conmail / Benjamin Franckaert
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#27
I stand corrected on the Decoration, still those are useful finds.
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#28
Quote:Let me introduce you my newest late roman tunic completely finished.
Absolutely beautiful!!
Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR
FECTIO Late Romans
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
[Image: artgroepbutton.jpg]
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