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First try at a Xiphos
#1
Obviously still a work in progress and,not based on any specific original but,how's it looking?


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#2
Compared to every other xiphos I've seen it looks spot on. What were your methods and what do you have planned for the handle and scabbard?
"The strong did what they could, the weak suffered what they must."

- Thucydides

Sean Cantrell
Northern Michigan
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#3
Thank you,I forge my blades,stock removal makes my head hurt,hats off to the guys that do,even with hearing protection and,a resperator the finish grinding I do is no fun for me.
It's a pretty basic shape in reality to forge,just have to cut the *spurs* for the guard from the bar and,draw them out.
Of course, found out the hard way that, cutting them from the grip end rather than the blade end is the best way.
Doing it the wrong way caused a bit of a structural problem with it that makes it not up to standard to sell so,may just put some wooden scales on it and,see how much abuse it can take Smile
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#4
Hello, very nice for a first try!
I have handled a number of originals and here are some specifications derived from those i have touched and those i have seen on museums.
For a sword of this type (it goes to the widest end) the blade tapers from about 6mm to 3mm near the tip. This makes the midrib in the widest part of the sword almost minimal. The thickness of the grip/tang is usually very small, as little as 2-3mm, even though some of them have a raised edge which adds structural strength and makes the tang look thicker from the side.
Total weight of all the swords i have handled, about 50-60cm long, is 400-500gr. This included a kopis (400gr), which was lighter than a xiphos of similar size (480gr). So much for the "heavy kopis" All these swords were in perfect condition, because they had been burnt in the funerary pyres. One of them even had a good amound of the ivory scales on the grip!
I would suggest that you grind the back corners of the guard, because all greek swords have them this way, instead of squared, which was a characteristic of Etruscan swords. Similar to the photo i have posted in this thread: http://www.romanarmytalk.com/70-product-...l?start=15
Also, if you have any excess metal on the grip, i would suggest forge widenning it a bit, especially in the half closer to the guard.

All greek swords i have seen have an iron guard, save for perhaps two or three that had organic guards, riveted on as one piece with the grip scales. None has ever had bronze elements on it, except for one sword that had small bronze rivets with semi-spherical heads. All other rivets were iron. No bronze scabbard pieces either, except perhaps for one found in Olympia, but i don't have the description of the photo from the book and i'm not sure. Wood, ivory, iron and maybe bone are all accurate though.
[attachment=8538]001_2013-12-11.JPG[/attachment]
Khaire
Giannis


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Giannis K. Hoplite
a.k.a.:Giannis Kadoglou
a.k.a.:Thorax
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#5
Thank you Giannis,very helpful Smile the tang on this is about 1/4 inch thick so I have plenty I can move around without going to thin.
One question,when you say iron guards what I picture is two solid iron plates matching the shape of the guard spurs of the tang riveted on?
Or,is organic covered with iron sheet like some pugios correct?
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#6
Done some fine tunning on the hilt shape,think it's getting a little better.


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#7
Quote:Done some fine tunning on the hilt shape,think it's getting a little better.

I'm liking where this is going...
"The strong did what they could, the weak suffered what they must."

- Thucydides

Sean Cantrell
Northern Michigan
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#8
Have to say,me too. Classical Greek is more of a fringe intrest for me but,like the *feel* of this,I could see making some with para-cord grips and,selling them to my *zombie apocalypse,doomsday prep* type customers :-D
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#9
Not a great picture but,think it may shape up,like alot of things I make for the first time,learning alot about how to do it by doing it Smile


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#10
Think this is what I'll put a hilt on,not unhappy with it next one will be better Confusedmile:
[attachment=8560]xip.jpg[/attachment]


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#11
Hello Dave. Good work.
I had written to you a long reply that got lost in the posting, somehow. So instead of trying to describe many and complicated types of hilts and guards, take a look at this e-book http://www.latsis-foundation.org/gr/elib.../book.html
It is very new, and it contains almost all the swords and weapons i have handled. Many of these are not in display in the museum and are being published for the first time. You will see a number of different hilt constructions, with solid guards, sheet covered hilts or all organic hilts. There are more hilt types, but i think this will cover you.
Khaire
Giannis
Giannis K. Hoplite
a.k.a.:Giannis Kadoglou
a.k.a.:Thorax
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#12
Wonderful book, Giannis, thanks for sharing! Is there a way to download it?
Eduardo Vázquez
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#13
No, as far as i can see, but you can print it.
Giannis K. Hoplite
a.k.a.:Giannis Kadoglou
a.k.a.:Thorax
[Image: -side-1.gif]
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#14
Wonderful! Thank you, Giannis.
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#15
Tried to refine the shape a little more,probably dosen't look to much different (unless you count the dried glue lol).


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