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Sassanian body armour - cuirass
#31
Quote:
Peteris Racinskis post=298256 Wrote:@Renatus - Sassanids are known to have used face masks due to literary evidence, like Ammianus' famous "statues of metal" quote.

Oh yes, I know that. I was referring to actual physical examples.

You cannot expect physical evidence to always be there.
Real name - Peteris Racinskis
TWC name - any variation of "Roach". Blatta Optima Maxima as of now.
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#32
Quote:
Renatus post=298265 Wrote:
Peteris Racinskis post=298256 Wrote:@Renatus - Sassanids are known to have used face masks due to literary evidence, like Ammianus' famous "statues of metal" quote.

Oh yes, I know that. I was referring to actual physical examples.

You cannot expect physical evidence to always be there.

You misunderstand. I was responding to this query:

Quote:I have read about face-masks on helmets. Does anyone know of any that have been found?
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#33
Only a short notice: (Sassano-)Kushan coinage often featured a muscle cuirass.

http://www.icollector.com/images/1026/20...6_1_lg.jpg
http://coinindia.com/Vasudeva-G506-367.40.jpg
http://ignca.nic.in/images/ac28/big/bsl45953.jpg
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[Image: regnumhesperium.png]
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#34
The Kushans provided their forces with armor of their own making. Why should the Sassanids alter their traditional armor, as long as it works?

Especially considering that the Kushans were a semi-autonomous buffer state.
Real name - Peteris Racinskis
TWC name - any variation of "Roach". Blatta Optima Maxima as of now.
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#35
I thought I ought to report back on some findings.

I re-examined the rock reliefs at Firuzabad closely. Ardavan is wearing what looks like a muscle cuirass without the abs - you can see the outlines of the chest, and a ridge or groove running from the bottom of the chest to the bottom of the cuirass.

A muscle cuirass may be depicted on the gem showing Shapur and Valerian. The exact nature of Shapur's armour is debated but most Iranologists I have spoken to are of the opinion that it is a muscle cuirass.

On the legs:

It seems that Sasanian leg armour was a very different beast to that found at Ai Khanom. It was made up of two pieces with a round knee cop. There also was an element of interchangeability - banded cuisses could be worn with banded or Greek-style greaves, and banded greaves could be worn with banded or scale/lamellar cuisses.

I will be writing all this up in due time Cool
Nadeem Ahmad

Eran ud Turan - reconstructing the Iranian and Indian world between Alexander and Islam
https://www.facebook.com/eranudturan
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#36
Where did you get these information? Evidence?
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#37
Iulian, armor was found in sites, and sculptural evidence is called in as well when the evidence in physical terms is lacking. This evidence is well known, and some of the sculptures are well known as well, such as the cameo of Shapur and Valerian. Experts are usually not to be argued with, if they have the evidence behind them. Nadeem is using the finds on a sculpture, and findings from sites.
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#38
IMO Firuzaband is depicting quilted cloth leggings, not banded metallic armour. This style of clothing was apparently worn at the time.
Author: Bronze Age Military Equipment, Pen & Sword Books
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#39
Quote:IMO Firuzaband is depicting quilted cloth leggings, not banded metallic armour. This style of clothing was apparently worn at the time.
We have been down this road earlier in this thread. For what it is worth, I go for metallic armour. In my view, the Roman clibanarius was based on the Sassanian model and all the descriptions of him, actual and poetic, imply that his armour was of metal. Similarly, when Ammianus describes the Sassanian heavily-armoured warrior, he mentions only metallic armour.
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#40
Quote:Iulian, armor was found in sites, and sculptural evidence is called in as well when the evidence in physical terms is lacking. This evidence is well known, and some of the sculptures are well known as well, such as the cameo of Shapur and Valerian. Experts are usually not to be argued with, if they have the evidence behind them. Nadeem is using the finds on a sculpture, and findings from sites.

I mean the knee cop, not the armor!
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#41
Close up of the Karen knight and the Suren knight on Firuzabad, and examination of some spahbed seals, clearly shows a disk on the knee.

Here is my reconstruction:

[Image: legarmer.jpg]

Also, old thread is old
Nadeem Ahmad

Eran ud Turan - reconstructing the Iranian and Indian world between Alexander and Islam
https://www.facebook.com/eranudturan
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#42
Quote:Close up of the Karen knight and the Suren knight on Firuzabad, and examination of some spahbed seals, clearly shows a disk on the knee.
Have you any pictures that you can post? This is interesting because Julian, when describing the leg armour of Constantius' cavalry, mentions knee-caps.
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#43
yup


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
           
Nadeem Ahmad

Eran ud Turan - reconstructing the Iranian and Indian world between Alexander and Islam
https://www.facebook.com/eranudturan
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#44
I'm a bit dubious about the Firuzabad relief but the seal seems pretty clear.
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#45
Awesome reconstruction, Nadeem. Good work!
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