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Comitatus at Wallington
#46
Funny. Did he walk away then?
M. Demetrius Abicio
(David Wills)

Saepe veritas est dura.
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#47
Yes, with a rather confused look on his face!

Makes me a bit embarassed about my profession when one of my so called colleagues asks questions like that
Claire Marshall

General Layabout

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.plateau-imprints.co.uk">www.plateau-imprints.co.uk
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#48
Clearly some archaeologists are not all they are cracked up to be.

Certainly spectators will often ask leading questions to try and get the re-enactor to begin a conversation. Sadly many spectators may be too shy or more likely too scared of showing their ignorance to try and start a conversation, so any questions are to be welcomed. Because they want to ask questions but often want to hide their level of knowledge the questions they ask are often silly or phrased in an unfortunate manner. Many people live their lives in a passive way watching television or working on their computer and have little or no experience to help them interact with a live “performer”. So while questions may be silly or even ignorant they are often asked by people who want to learn more. They give us a great opportunity to start a dialogue, give information, to interpret the past and perhaps engage and educate people about history and so much more. Such questions offer the chance to positive engage the public at shows. In my experience only a few spectators, sadly often re-enactors themselves, deliberately try to be rude or ask leading questions.

Hi Paul, my business has taught 80% of the primary schools in your home town this school year and the Sewerby Hall shows certainly seem to be legendary. Big Grin Indeed, the last one was also wet and windy. Sad We’ve told the schools to come and see us at Sledmere House which is only 30 minutes away.

http://comitatus.net/events.html

Pass it on to your school as well. It is a beautiful place with a great atmosphere.
Local authorities don’t have much cash at present and it is positive to move to different venues, although sadly we can only do one August Bank Holiday event. The Senhouse Museum at Maryport stage a series of Roman events during the summer and it is great to be the highlight of their calendar on August Bank Holiday. Smile

http://www.senhousemuseum.co.uk/

It is another seaside location with fish and chips suppers over-looking the coast. The sunsets are magical.
John Conyard

York

A member of Comitatus Late Roman
Reconstruction Group

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.comitatus.net">http://www.comitatus.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.historicalinterpretations.net">http://www.historicalinterpretations.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com">http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com
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#49
Often it's hard to remember that even though I've answered the same question ten times, it is still the first time that THIS person asked, and they don't know about the other ten people.
M. Demetrius Abicio
(David Wills)

Saepe veritas est dura.
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#50
It is hard to remember that I agree. It is also much easier said than done.

But many groups are paid for their attendance at events; in effect they are at the "professional" end of the re-enactment spectrum. Their members have to behave in a professional way. They are there to bring the venue alive and make history engaging, and have a duty to engage the public.

And if visitors have paid hard earned cash to attend an event the chances are they are interested in the period. They will be interesting to talk to and have their own stories and opinions to relate.
John Conyard

York

A member of Comitatus Late Roman
Reconstruction Group

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.comitatus.net">http://www.comitatus.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.historicalinterpretations.net">http://www.historicalinterpretations.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com">http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com
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#51
Well...I took my Roman saddle to a dressage training weekend just last week to do some experimenting on the advanced horse simulator they have there. As I was "tacking up" the sim horse one of the other girls said "Wow, that's in really good nick for a Roman saddle!"

She was somewhat embarassed when I gently pointed out it was a reconstruction of the design... Big Grin Big Grin Big Grin
Moi Watson

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Merlot in one hand, Cigar in the other; body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming "WOO HOO, what a ride!
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#52
Almost always, I keep the flippant answers in my brain, and release them only on forum like here. But sometimes it's really tempting.

We were at Lafe, and a young fellow picked up a boiled egg from the mess table. He asked, "What's this". Someone answered, "An egg". "Oh," says the boy, "what's in it?" The answer came with no emotion attached. "Egg."
M. Demetrius Abicio
(David Wills)

Saepe veritas est dura.
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#53
Maybe the members of the public we are talking about see the past as some very remote, exotic, fantastic movie-version of reality. "Surely that can't be an egg, or a sausage, that can't be a Roman pair of pliers. We have those things today, are these guys fakes?!!"
Paul Elliott

Legions in Crisis
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/17815...d_i=468294

Charting the Third Century military crisis - with a focus on the change in weapons and tactics.
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#54
Going back to the photos of Wallington, I was impressed by the horse with body, neck and head armour. Any chance of seeing a fully armoured clibanarius on it at any time?
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#55
I feel the impending doom of somebody about to be included in a discussion on the definition of clibanarius or even a cataphract.

So side-stepping that issue I suspect there is little chance of the rider wearing any more armour in the future. Occasionaly he has worn a manica on each arm. But generally he keeps his load to a minimum.Over the course of a weekend we try and conserve the horses energy as much as possible. The horse armour is heavy enough.

A rather sad mealy mouthed answer, but there we are. :-)


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John Conyard

York

A member of Comitatus Late Roman
Reconstruction Group

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.comitatus.net">http://www.comitatus.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.historicalinterpretations.net">http://www.historicalinterpretations.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com">http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com
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#56
A pity but you know your horses' capabilities.

You are probably familiar with this thread but, if not, you may find it interesting. Unfortunately, most of the photos are no longer available but a couple of the links still work:

http://www.romanarmytalk.com/rat.html?fu...&id=110351

Does anyone know what has become of Warren Lambley?
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#57
As far as I am aware Warren seems to be into medieval re-enactment at present. But you'd have to ask him. 8)
Amy Wallace

A member of Comitatus Late Roman
Reconstruction Group
http://www.comitatus.net
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#58
Quote:Does anyone know what has become of Warren Lambley?
His FB pages has a fine Medieval show in Chile (Orden de León Rampante), about a month ago.
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Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR: Forum rules
FECTIO Late Roman Society
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
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#59
Forgive me posting in an old topic but the National Trust photographer sent us a disc last week with some great shots on it.

[attachment=1112]IMG_6895.JPG[/attachment]

[attachment=1113]IMG_6893.JPG[/attachment]

They are really too late to go up on the events page of the website, although I am sure we will use some around the website. But there are some pictures which technically are the best I seen this year. He had a great camera.


[attachment=1114]IMG_6907.JPG[/attachment]

[attachment=1115]IMG_6840.JPG[/attachment]


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John Conyard

York

A member of Comitatus Late Roman
Reconstruction Group

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.comitatus.net">http://www.comitatus.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.historicalinterpretations.net">http://www.historicalinterpretations.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com">http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com
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#60
Nice photos of you lot John!
One more, a taking refreshments after defeating the enemy cavelry!!
Also answering questions for some intelligent little girls!


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Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
Titus Flavius Germanus
Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
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