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Show here your Sarmatian warrior impression
#61
Took some details from archers on Traianus column to make this helmet.
TiTvS Philippvs/Filip
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.legioxi.be">www.legioxi.be
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#62
It looks great! I like the scale aventail. Did you make it?
Alan J. Campbell

member of Legio III Cyrenaica and the Uncouth Barbarians

Author of:
The Demon's Door Bolt (2011)
Forging the Blade (2012)

"It's good to be king. Even when you're dead!"
             Old Yuezhi/Pazyrk proverb
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#63
Yes, I made the helmet from scratch.
The "Scale Armor & Accuracy Topic was a great help for the aventail.
I'm thinking about making some scale-armor.
Based the helmet on a picture I took some years ago in Rome.

[attachment=6367]detail.jpg[/attachment]
Going to put some more detail in the cheek-plates like in the picture.

Here some pictures "In Progress"

[attachment=6368]IMG_0699.jpg[/attachment]

[attachment=6369]IMG_0701.jpg[/attachment]

This helmet weight is 2 Kg and has a snug fit so I have no problem jumping around and bending over.
I hate oversized helmets :-x

[attachment=6370]IMG_0711.jpg[/attachment]


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TiTvS Philippvs/Filip
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.legioxi.be">www.legioxi.be
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#64
Back to you, Sutoris

You did a great job, and the aventail looks quite "eastern"... which I like. I, too, have thought of making an armored kaftan. If I do, I'm going to add protectors down the thighs in cavalry fashion. Simonenko has noted that Sarmato/Alanic armor also included lamellar, and I have also seen plate armor at the upper body. It would be great to make armor that combined all the styles into one unit. This type is very old and adopted by the Eastern Zhao around 400BC. The Emperor decreed that his cavalry had to wear "barbarian" clothing. Combo armor is seen on the Orlat Battle Plaque, and it was still worn into the late Han Dynasty, c. AD 200. We don't really know what exact style reached Europe through the Sarmatians but I think the diversity we see coming from Duro Europa is an indicator that lamellar was a reality.
Alan J. Campbell

member of Legio III Cyrenaica and the Uncouth Barbarians

Author of:
The Demon's Door Bolt (2011)
Forging the Blade (2012)

"It's good to be king. Even when you're dead!"
             Old Yuezhi/Pazyrk proverb
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#65
Alanus wrote:
The tunic is too long so I have to hike it up with an under-belt. That accounts for what looks like a roll of fat above my equipment belt.

You think so? I suspect Hellenising portraits of the Iranian nomads often tend to shorten the "barbaric" length of the tunics, because in Iranian and Central Asian art, these tunics seem to be rather longer when shown dismounted, but of the same cut. Or did you use a surviving example of a tunic from this period?

Alanus wrote:
We don't really know what exact style reached Europe through the Sarmatians but I think the diversity we see coming from Duro Europa is an indicator that lamellar was a reality.

I could not find a good collection of images, but look at the trophies taken from the Dacians, Sarmatians and their allies on the pedestal of the column of Trajan. These armours seem to be quit long, of the type that would appear from the 3rd century CE onwards as Roman equipment. One is of mail construction, with a very Oriental crèpe lining of the short sleeves. Another of scale construction with long scale (!) sleeves, which might sound odd, but such scale sleeves have been found in Scythian graves in the Kuban area, so they had been indigenous on the steppes where these nomads came from, and reappear on a similar Roman depiction of scale armour from the 4th century. One armour is especially interesting, of apparently segmented construction, both for the body and for the sleeves. Many of the details shown on the column seem to derive from hearsay, but the trophies would have beeen exhibited in Rome, so the artist could have taken a better look at them.
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#66
Hello, Eduard

Yes, there's a great diversity in Sarmatian/steppe costume and armor. I wear a brick red tunic, long as mentioned, my armor is customized chainmail, and the helmet is straight from Trajan's column. The splint greaves got a bit of flack from some RAT members; but since the Scythians and Huns wore them, I believe the Sarmatians used them also... being sandwiched between both cultures. Cool

Anyway, when I first started putting together a Roxolani impression, nobody else was attempting it. That has changed and the number of Sarmatian/Alanic and steppe impressions is growing. :cheer:
Alan J. Campbell

member of Legio III Cyrenaica and the Uncouth Barbarians

Author of:
The Demon's Door Bolt (2011)
Forging the Blade (2012)

"It's good to be king. Even when you're dead!"
             Old Yuezhi/Pazyrk proverb
Reply
#67
Hi, here is my Sarmatian outfit, still working on the body armour and the Han-sword.

[attachment=7046]531961_10151359368672452_1529856317_n.jpg[/attachment]


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TiTvS Philippvs/Filip
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.legioxi.be">www.legioxi.be
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#68
Excellent! :woot:

A great outfit, and that bow? It looks much like my Grozer.
The akinakes turned out perfect.

Finally, we are beginning to see a few Sarmatian warriors on RAT. This has been my great hope. By the way; on May 4th, Legio III will be at Kennebunk, Maine, and they'll have 2 Sarmatian archers in their group (me and my grandson, Devyn Campbell). Confusedmile:
Alan J. Campbell

member of Legio III Cyrenaica and the Uncouth Barbarians

Author of:
The Demon's Door Bolt (2011)
Forging the Blade (2012)

"It's good to be king. Even when you're dead!"
             Old Yuezhi/Pazyrk proverb
Reply
#69
Quote:Excellent! :woot:

A great outfit, and that bow? It looks much like my Grozer.
The akinakes turned out perfect.
Finally, we are beginning to see a few Sarmatian warriors on RAT. This has been my great hope. By the way; on May 4th, Legio III will be at Kennebunk, Maine, and they'll have 2 Sarmatian archers in their group (me and my grandson, Devyn Campbell). Confusedmile:

Thanks, The bow is the Grözer Hunnish biocomponent.
Do you think that the trousers are ok, I used a Russian pattern and the legs turned out baggy.
Do you have a picture of you grandson in Sarmatian kit?
TiTvS Philippvs/Filip
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.legioxi.be">www.legioxi.be
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#70
Hello, Sutoris

I'll have pics of Devyn after we suit-up at Kennebunkport. Our trousers are "too baggy" also. Right now, Devyn has an Istvan Toth "Magyar" bow, but it looks similar to Grozer's Iaz model; the sayahs are shaped like deer-feet. Since I don't have extra chainmail, he'll be wearing a cut-down lorica segmentata. We both will carry Type 1 Sarmatian swords, made to my design by Jkoo, Longquan smiths that go back to the Chi'-in dynasty.

I like your boots. Unlike Eduard, I have no problems with boots that have soles. Out on the steppe, the styles of boot were extremely elective. The Ukok princess wore them thigh-high. The Churchen Man had white boots just over the knee. The Sogdians wore boots with not just soles but even heels. All steppe groups had to walk, sooner or later, if for no other reason than collecting horse chips. To think that boots had no soles, to easily wear out, is a fallacy... perhaps started by Ammianus. :dizzy:

For the electic styles of footwear, we have several illustrations found in John Conyard's original post on Page 1 of the thread, "Sarmatian/Persian Soft Kit."

Oh, and I'll bet the biocomposite Hunnic bow by Grozer is fairly maintainance-free. Confusedmile:
Alan J. Campbell

member of Legio III Cyrenaica and the Uncouth Barbarians

Author of:
The Demon's Door Bolt (2011)
Forging the Blade (2012)

"It's good to be king. Even when you're dead!"
             Old Yuezhi/Pazyrk proverb
Reply
#71
The Sogdians do not have heels, they tie a ribbon under the instep which draws the shoe into the arch of the foot, giving it the appearance of a heel, but it is not so.
Nadeem Ahmad

Eran ud Turan - reconstructing the Iranian and Indian world between Alexander and Islam
https://www.facebook.com/eranudturan
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#72
I did that to Daryush.
I used soft leather for the boots upper so a leather strap keeps them in place.

[attachment=7077]Naamloos.jpg[/attachment]


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TiTvS Philippvs/Filip
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.legioxi.be">www.legioxi.be
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#73
Quote: The splint greaves got a bit of flack from some RAT members; but since the Scythians and Huns wore them, I believe the Sarmatians used them also... being sandwiched between both cultures.

Hm, I only know of the Nymphaion find as source for scythian time greaves of laced bronzelamellae. The next find in time I know of is the find from Valsgaarde from vendel era in Sweden, which consists of two greaves and one vambrace of partial decorated iron strips riveted to leather bands with bronze rivets and are extended with mail for the hand and the feet. And the depiction of an Avar, Bolgar or Chasar at the medailon-flagon number 2 from the hoard of Nagyszentmiklos/ Sannicolau Mare. Both are dated to mid 7th century.

So which evidence do you mean when you state that the Huns have used them too? Did I miss something?

kind regards
Stephan Eitler
WAR CHUNNI ( http://www.awaren.net )
et
ERGASTERION BOSPOROU ( https://www.facebook.com/GensDanubiusEtP...us?fref=ts )
et
HETAIROI ( http://www.hetairoi.de )
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#74
Stephan, I could not find any proof for this Hunnic splint armour either.
However, according to Bishop and Coulston Roman Military Equipment, among the Romano-Thracian burials full-length splint greaves have been found. It is in one of the BAR series, I will look it up because I want to see that for myself too.
It would be interesting, because that the Nymphaion splints and the Vendel splints are part of an uninterupted tradition is plausible, but these Roman splints would go a long way in conneting these two finds both spatially and in time (By the way, I have been told remnants of splint armour for the arms have been found in Korea and Japan, dating to the 6th century CE. However, I only saw the reconstructions by Angus McBride, a poor substitute for the real thing).
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#75
Quote:By the way, I have been told remnants of splint armour for the arms have been found in Korea and Japan, dating to the 6th century CE. However, I only saw the reconstructions by Angus McBride, a poor substitute for the real thing

Hm, that would not surprise me. The thight conection (in the field of material culture) of the nomadic world in 6th and 7th century which shows up best in the fields of armour, arms and clothing from the Avar Khaganate in the west the the Silla in the east. Keyword for armour for example Niederstotzingen-Stara Zagora-Kerc-Schortschuk-Kyzil-tomb of T'ang Tai-zong-Dunhuang-Bokchongdong, or for the Ringpommelswords Bocsa/Kunagota/Kunbabony/Vizegrad-Mala Perescepina-Afrasiab-three Kingdoms Korea-Kofun-jidai Japan. Lets not forget Persia and Sogdia as important intermediators.

Maybe you mean some vambraces or greaves related to Tanko- or Keiko-armour. Altough the shino-suneate was at least since the heian-jidai the most popular greave-form in Japan.


It would be indeed interessting if the evolutionary-gap and the time-gap between Nymphaion and Valsgaarde could be filled, but that would need more than only one find between them IMHO. Anyway we speak of an time-gap of more than a thousand years and I am sure that not only the wheel was invented more than one time. So I believe the splint greaves that appear in 6th century are a new invention and not a tradition to the one find from Nymphaion. Just my opinion.

It would be of help if we can find out the estimated date and construction of the finds Bishop and Coulston are reffering to.
Stephan Eitler
WAR CHUNNI ( http://www.awaren.net )
et
ERGASTERION BOSPOROU ( https://www.facebook.com/GensDanubiusEtP...us?fref=ts )
et
HETAIROI ( http://www.hetairoi.de )
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