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Sarmatian Cavalry
#46
Quote:What we need are trilobate heads, but I can't find anyone who makes or sells them.:???:

Well, here are three of the arrowheads I have in my collection. They are all available through Robert Wimmers (http://en.noviolocus.com/assortiment/447/), who is also a member of this board (username Robert). I think the middle is one you would like Wink

[Image: arrowHeads.jpg]
________________________________________
Jvrjenivs Peregrinvs Magnvs / FEBRVARIVS
A.K.A. Jurjen Draaisma
CORBVLO and Fectio
ALA I BATAVORUM
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#47
I tried to email Robert, but the email address won't work.
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#48
Quote:I tried to email Robert, but the email address won't work.

Uhm, strange. Anyway, I've suggested Robert to take a look on here, so I expect he'll get to you soon enough Big Grin
________________________________________
Jvrjenivs Peregrinvs Magnvs / FEBRVARIVS
A.K.A. Jurjen Draaisma
CORBVLO and Fectio
ALA I BATAVORUM
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#49
Cezar on this forum sells excellent tanged and socketed trilobates, as does Hector.

A few can be viewed on http://www.comitatus.net/gallerymissile.html
John Conyard

York

A member of Comitatus Late Roman
Reconstruction Group

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.comitatus.net">http://www.comitatus.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.historicalinterpretations.net">http://www.historicalinterpretations.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com">http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com
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#50
Hi all,

Jurjen gave me a Heads up on this thread. You can contact me at r.p.wimmers<AT>hotmail.com or through the Noviolocus website. I have several kinds of arrowheads in stock of the types Jurjen showed. The trilobate ones are based on the finds from Xanten and the one from Nijmegen. They are tanged and as close to the original as I could get. Those are mostly even smaller. The barded biblades Jurjen showed are also from Xanten, these are really mean as well. Both are pretty difficult to make, so it is little wonder these are not widely available. I would not advise you to try these on targets, they are really a pain to remove from anything (which kind of figures if you shoot them at your enemy :-) ) !!
Salvete et Valete

Nil volentibus arduum


Robert P. Wimmers
Archeologie Beleven!
>http://www.ferrumantica.eu  (The NEW Fabrica of Vvlpivs!)
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#51
John, does the saddles have a strap like a conventional harness and a set of straps on the front to join through the front legs?
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#52
Good morning,

The saddles have attachments for a split girth. They do not come with a girth. They do come with breaching and breast straps. The breast strap has a ring in it to which you can run a strap to the girth, as I do.
John Conyard

York

A member of Comitatus Late Roman
Reconstruction Group

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.comitatus.net">http://www.comitatus.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.historicalinterpretations.net">http://www.historicalinterpretations.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com">http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com
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#53
Thats what I thought. Does it help with stability, using the girth strap? I'm hoping this weekend to start on cutting out scales, got a new stone for my grinder and forwarned my father.

Where can you find the dragon head standards at, as shown on your website? Did the dragon head originate from the Sarmatians?
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#54
Greetings All!

I think the draco standard originated with the Sarmatians' and Alans' predecessors, the Scythians and Saka. Early on, the Dacians had dracos but they were probably influenced by the neighbors, the Scythians. The draco on the Orlat plaque has no dragon-head, just a dragon windsock.

Here is a picture of some of the trilobate arrowheads found at the Filippovka kurgans:
[attachment=622]filippovkaswordarrowheads005.JPG[/attachment]
They're bronze and not much different than Scythian ones. A later 1st cent.BC kurgan excavated at Rostov-on-Don had 112 iron heads, a dozen bronze ones, and 5 highly polished bone ones.

On the subject of Filippovka, here is photo of the Kurgan 1 sword, a fancy one with gold inlay reminiscent of Chinese ones although the artistic style is totally different:
[attachment=623]filippovkaswordarrowheads002.JPG[/attachment]
The sword is 87cm long or 35.5 inches. This is early, about 4th to 3rd century BC, but it shows a sophisticated blade with two wide grooves (fullers) on each side of the central spine.

The accompanying akinakes has a doubled gryphon-head pommel and was 17 inches long. It is almost identical to the one strapped to the right leg of the "Golden Woman" of Issyk Kul. The weapons changed slightly over time, but the practice of akinakes on the right leg and sword at the left hip seems to be standard, as noted in Treister's excellent research.Smile


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
       
Alan J. Campbell

member of Legio III Cyrenaica and the Uncouth Barbarians

Author of:
The Demon's Door Bolt (2011)
Forging the Blade (2012)

"It's good to be king. Even when you're dead!"
             Old Yuezhi/Pazyrk proverb
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#55
Quote:Where can you find the dragon head standards at, as shown on your website? Did the dragon head originate from the Sarmatians?

Robert Vermaat did some writing on the Draco:
http://www.fectio.org.uk/articles/articles.htm

Here a picture of yours sincerely with the Fectio draco:
[Image: JurjenDraco.jpg]
(and my half-way 4th century cavalryman impression)
________________________________________
Jvrjenivs Peregrinvs Magnvs / FEBRVARIVS
A.K.A. Jurjen Draaisma
CORBVLO and Fectio
ALA I BATAVORUM
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#56
There is a close up of the existing snake-headed example here:

http://comitatus.net/gallerycavalrytack.html
John Conyard

York

A member of Comitatus Late Roman
Reconstruction Group

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.comitatus.net">http://www.comitatus.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.historicalinterpretations.net">http://www.historicalinterpretations.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com">http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com
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#57
Quote:There is a close up of the existing snake-headed example here:

http://comitatus.net/gallerycavalrytack.html

Hello John,

That same Comitatus page has an excellent wooden steppe saddle.
I wonder who designed it (hint, hint, hint):?:
Alan J. Campbell

member of Legio III Cyrenaica and the Uncouth Barbarians

Author of:
The Demon's Door Bolt (2011)
Forging the Blade (2012)

"It's good to be king. Even when you're dead!"
             Old Yuezhi/Pazyrk proverb
Reply
#58
Our steppe saddle is based on on of these:

http://felszerelesek.lovasijaszat.hu/fel...d=9&lang=2

These may be OK to base something on.

http://www.turania.hu/catalog/disztargy-...0_111.html

or just make one yourself.

The steppe saddle seemes to be around from the 340's.

I have not yet had a chance to consider arrows yet.
John Conyard

York

A member of Comitatus Late Roman
Reconstruction Group

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.comitatus.net">http://www.comitatus.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.historicalinterpretations.net">http://www.historicalinterpretations.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com">http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com
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#59
Quote:Our steppe saddle is based on on of these:

http://felszerelesek.lovasijaszat.hu/fel...d=9&lang=2

These may be OK to base something on.

http://www.turania.hu/catalog/disztargy-...0_111.html

or just make one yourself.

The steppe saddle seemes to be around from the 340's.
with all do respect the steppe saddle has been for at least a thousand years before yoyr date of 340AD.
What you referring here to is the wooden-frame aka 'tree' saddle - and that saddle is associated with European Sarmatians from Pontic Steppe area in the European context- see already listed work on Sarmatians by Simonenko, pages 221-234

by the way what is the weight of your horsebow and what kind of arrows - length etc - are you using?
bachmat66 (Dariusz T. Wielec)
<a class="postlink" href="http://dariocaballeros.blogspot.com/">http://dariocaballeros.blogspot.com/
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#60
Quote:by the way what is the weight of your horsebow and what kind of arrows - length etc - are you using?

I'd like to know what kind of arrows John is using, too.:grin: They look impressive.
I don't make my own and use three-fletched full-length ones by Kelemen Szaloky. I think they are 32-inches. They work great uncut with my 45-lb bows. They would be more accurate if I could shoot straighter!:roll:
Alan J. Campbell

member of Legio III Cyrenaica and the Uncouth Barbarians

Author of:
The Demon's Door Bolt (2011)
Forging the Blade (2012)

"It's good to be king. Even when you're dead!"
             Old Yuezhi/Pazyrk proverb
Reply


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