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Calling all armchair generals! Boudica's Last Stand.
(02-17-2018, 01:20 PM)Theoderic Wrote: would he not have had the Batavians with him? ... Could the space needed have been narrower?

We can't be sure which auxiliary units Paulinus had with him, although Batavians, Tungrians and others from Gaul, Belgica and Hispania seem probable.

The space may have been narrower indeed - I was estimating on the basis that most Roman forces that we have any clue about seem to have been around 10% cavalry, and P would presumably have grouped his lighter missile troops away from or behind the main infantry line.

As a rough guess of his army composition, I'd say 4800 men of Legio XIV plus a 480-man veteran vexillatio (from Wroxeter?), another 480-man vexillatio of Legio XX (from Usk?), then two cavalry alae at 512 men each, three auxiliary infantry cohorts at 480 men each and three cohortes equitatae at 480 infantry and 120 cavalry each. That would give Paulinus 8640 infantry and 1384 cavalry - 10,024 men total. Many of these units would have been understrength, of course!



(02-17-2018, 01:20 PM)Theoderic Wrote: we haven't found that much archeology as yet referring to the battle site - apart from the Tring helmet  Undecided

That would depend on whether you consider a pilum shank, fragment of armour, sword grip and an unknown number of sling bullets and arrow heads (all found at Newground/Cow Roast, close to the Tring helmet find) to be 'archaeology'... [Image: wink.png]
Nathan Ross
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Nathan wrote

As a rough guess of his army composition, I'd say 4800 men of Legio XIV plus a 480-man veteran vexillatio (from Wroxeter?), another 480-man vexillatio of Legio XX (from Usk?), then two cavalry alae at 512 men each, three auxiliary infantry cohorts at 480 men each and three cohortes equitatae at 480 infantry and 120 cavalry each. That would give Paulinus 8640 infantry and 1384 cavalry - 10,024 men total. Many of these units would have been understrength, of course!

I would agree  Smile



Nathan wrote

That would depend on whether you consider a pilum shank, fragment of armour, sword grip and an unknown number of sling bullets and arrow heads (all found at Newground/Cow Roast, close to the Tring helmet find) to be 'archaeology'... [Image: wink.png]

Absoloutely  Smile
Deryk
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(02-15-2018, 02:21 PM)Nathan Ross Wrote: The translation 'defile' is confusing - the word Tacitus uses means 'throat' - so it's an open pass or through-way between hills, 'closed' in the rear by woods, not by high ground. It is not a closed valley or an indentation in an escarpment.

(02-16-2018, 12:30 PM)Nathan Ross Wrote: I would guess a gap of c.1000 metres is about right.

Just so that I have this clear in my own mind, we're looking for a relatively steep sided valley (not just a gap between two hills) about half a mile wide. Is that right?
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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(02-17-2018, 04:34 PM)Renatus Wrote: we're looking for a relatively steep sided valley (not just a gap between two hills) about half a mile wide. Is that right?

Half a mile is probably about right.

'Gap between hills' - well, maybe. A range of hills or an escarpment would be better, to avoid outflanking - which is why these sites in the Chilterns we've been looking at are quite good. If you have a range of hills or high ground, or an escarpment, and some sort of half-mile gap or pass through through those hills, ideally with trees on the far side, then I think you've got the right sort of 'throat shaped' feature.

'Steepness' is always going to be relative, as we've discussed before! Even what appears to be a relatively mild gradient on a map could make a different in terms of movement on a battlefield, I'd say.
Nathan Ross
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