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Roman Fort for Reenactement Proposes
#16
Once again, Duncan's books are excellent and up-to-date.
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#17
Yes, I agree on the point about Duncans books, I appreciate them as a very informative and well illustrated intorduction to foorts.

Mr Scipio, thanks for pointing out the other 2 books, are they still in print?

Mr Seige, although it sounds as if you may have your materials dictated to you if you cannot find timber in quantity at a reasonable rate,
but look at Lunt fort, at Bagington, Coventry, it is a reconstruction of a mid/late first cent fort, of timber and turf, whic was reconstructed
wit hthe help of the British Army Engineerig Corp(IIRC), and may help somewhat in your decision making process.
Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
Titus Flavius Germanus
Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
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#18
this is so wierd. I read that book for a term paper. Our library has the wilson book that Mr Scipio mentions and I think it is a kids book lol. :lol: but the pictures are old (non-color type) and the plans (like of each fort) are realy bad. i liked the osprey one because it compares diffrent forts (the plans I mean) which i have never seen before. Also it is diffrent than the Wilson book because it explains some cool Roman insciptions (I cant do Latin but it explains them too). And the pictures are awsome omg not just the paintings also the photos.

And also it is not about forts in britian and germany but all over, there is an awsome picture from Lybia and places in europe. I like it because it explains everthing. Thats what Osprey is good for.
** Vincula/Lucy **
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#19
First of all, I'm sorry for being away this last two months. School exams...

What Osprey book are you mentioning, Vincula? I'm reading a lot of Osprey books, but I haven't found that type of comparison yet.
I Do live close enough Estremadura, I must go there at once!

About the materials: It is true that we have good stone, but in roman times thee were really good wood around. In south Portugal there are lots of forts (majority medival) build with earth bricks or compressed in-sitiu huge bricks (Taipa). Would't it be possible that some forts were in adobe (small earth bricks)? I know that at this moment and for the scale of the project, there's no chance of doing it on stone, I just wanted to know if I'm projecting a type of fort that would only be found in other country, or a type of fort that were indeed present in one or two places in the region.

Best regrets and keep discussing the books! I'm going to read them all Smile
Best regrets; David
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#20
Quote:What Osprey book are you mentioning, Vincula? I'm reading a lot of Osprey books, but I haven't found that type of comparison yet.
I Do live close enough Estremadura, I must go there at once!
It is Roman auxiliary forts AD 27 to 378: http://www.amazon.com/Roman-Auxiliary-Forts-BC-AD-Fortress/dp/1846033802/
** Vincula/Lucy **
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#21
As Jona said, there are two books on your topic that are readily available, with illustrations, some dimensional information, and good reading lists in their bibliographies. Good luck, and please let us see your final project: we're all interested in seeing where your search leads.
M. Demetrius Abicio
(David Wills)

Saepe veritas est dura.
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#22
Surely "Building a Roman legionary Fortress" by Elizabeth Shirley should be on the reading list? Published by Tempus in 2001, it covers not just building techniques but also dimensions, carpentry styles and methods as well as analysis of manpower and estimated time requirements. Full of diagrams, I would have liked more possible reconstruction drawings of the buildings but that is just me.
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#23
Quote:... it covers not just building techniques but also dimensions, carpentry styles and methods as well as analysis of manpower and estimated time requirements.
Maybe a 50-acre fortress is a little ambitious? :wink:
posted by Duncan B Campbell
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#24
Wow! That's a lot of wall, for sure! Better bring a big piggybank.
M. Demetrius Abicio
(David Wills)

Saepe veritas est dura.
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#25
Quote:
Taff Simon:zzge69yl Wrote:... it covers not just building techniques but also dimensions, carpentry styles and methods as well as analysis of manpower and estimated time requirements.
Maybe a 50-acre fortress is a little ambitious? :wink:

Caesar, Octavian, Agricola et al were also ambitious....aim high and live the dream. ( a lottery win might help though Big Grin )
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#26
Ambitious? They say that Caesar is ambitios...but yon Crassus hath a lean and hungry look....

Quote:Caesar, Octavian, Agricola
They all had a little larger treasury than I, and could simply commandeer labor and funds from their neighbors, or take it by force of arms if they needed to. Down here in Texas, a fellow can get in trouble for behavior like that.
M. Demetrius Abicio
(David Wills)

Saepe veritas est dura.
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#27
Quote:Down here in Texas, a fellow can get in trouble for behavior like that.

Only if you lose.
Richard Campbell
Legio XX - Alexandria, Virginia
RAT member #6?
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