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Ancient Warfare: Reader\'s questions Special?
#1
As many of you surely know, I often get very specific questions as suggestions for articles in Ancient Warfare. I normally have to disappoint them, as the theme driven concept of Ancient Warfare does not allow such questions. However, as an experiment, what do you think of this: a Special issue of 72 pages (+4 card cover) devoted to 12-14 detail questions about the Imperial Roman army that the readers come up with. The suggestions can go from the very detailed (eg: was there a commander of the contubernium or not?) to the abstract (what's our best estimate of the [development of] the size of the Roman army in legions, auxiliary units and fleets). We'll pick the doable suggestions, have a vote and then commission from our extensive network of specialist authors (I pick 'em) to write those 12-14 articles. The usual original artwork will be in evidence as well.

There's one 'but', however. Publishing such a special is not cheap. We'll only go ahead once we get 600 committed pre-orders (of course, if we do it, I'll collect those from a wider audience than just RAT). Sounds like a big number, but it's certainly doable. Pre-order price will be the same as for the other specials, €16,- shipping included.

How's that sound?
Greets!

Jasper Oorthuys
Webmaster & Editor, Ancient Warfare magazine
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#2
I'd personally like to see AW devote an issue to Roman Reenactors, with everything ranging from Drill Commands, to daily soldier's activities, except have it researched by actual academics, and then tested by reenactors prior to being published. Attempts have been made in the past and present to attempt such a feat but has lacked true academic input, vision and experience.
____________________________________________________________
Magnus/Matt
LEGIO II AVG COH VIII
It amazes me how quickly stupid people are out-breeding the smart ones.

"The greatest impediment of all is the square-jawed, flat-talking Tatum, who is so wooden he presents a fire hazard." - The Toronto Star on Channing Tatum in "The Eagle".

"I am on a drug. It\'s called Charlie Sheen. If you try it once, you will die. Your face will melt off and your children will weep over your exploded body" - Charlie Sheen
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#3
Good idea Jasper.

You might even consider a section of well known but incorrect "facts" a la Jona's Common Errors of Classical History.

Your special edition on the Varian Disaster of 9 CE was a hit, so chances are this Special Edition will be too.

:wink:

Narukami
David Reinke
Burbank CA
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#4
Yeah, count me in! And although I also like Matts idea, I don't think that would be duable, although I know there is some more experimental archeology going on by academic re-enactors. But again, short scientific based artickles 'for the re-enactor' would be interesting, but would also lower the interested, I think.
________________________________________
Jvrjenivs Peregrinvs Magnvs / FEBRVARIVS
A.K.A. Jurjen Draaisma
CORBVLO and Fectio
ALA I BATAVORUM
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#5
It might work well, depending on which questions exactly we're talking about. I need suggestions people! Tongue
Greets!

Jasper Oorthuys
Webmaster & Editor, Ancient Warfare magazine
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#6
Quote:Yeah, count me in! And although I also like Matts idea, I don't think that would be duable, although I know there is some more experimental archeology going on by academic re-enactors. But again, short scientific based artickles 'for the re-enactor' would be interesting, but would also lower the interested, I think.

Why isn't it do-able Jurjen? Something official as a guide for reenactors that can span more than one group is definately required. Maybe not so much in Europe, where reenacting is more based on displays than actual living history, but definately in N. America. Besides, it can be an opportunity for the Academics to cross over that bridge, something that I think should happen much more often.
____________________________________________________________
Magnus/Matt
LEGIO II AVG COH VIII
It amazes me how quickly stupid people are out-breeding the smart ones.

"The greatest impediment of all is the square-jawed, flat-talking Tatum, who is so wooden he presents a fire hazard." - The Toronto Star on Channing Tatum in "The Eagle".

"I am on a drug. It\'s called Charlie Sheen. If you try it once, you will die. Your face will melt off and your children will weep over your exploded body" - Charlie Sheen
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#7
I would for sure buy an issue about tools carried (both entrenching and other tools) by the Legion. You could also have drawings of and discussions on the use of those tools.
Some are mentioned in De Re Militari The two I have outlined in bold I haven't seen discussed. There are some mentions in Caesar's commentaries which may be these tools used as siege tools but I suspect they may be dual purpose tools also used in moving logs and cutting limbs and brush.

" The legion carries with it a number of small boats, each hollowed out of a single piece of timber, with long cables and sometimes iron chains to fasten them together. These boats, joined and covered with planks, serve as bridges over unfordable rivers, on which both cavalry and infantry pass without danger. The legion is provided with iron hooks, called wolves, and iron scythes fixed to the ends of long poles; and with forks, spades, shovels, pickaxes, wheelbarrows and baskets for digging and transporting earth; together with hatchets, axes and saws for cutting wood. Besides which, a train of workmen attend on it furnished with all instruments necessary for the construction of tortoises, musculi, rams, vines, moving towers and other machines for the attack of places. As the enumeration of all the particulars of this sort would be too tedious, I shall only observe that the legion should carry with it wherever it moves, whatever is necessary for every kind of service so that the encampments may have all the strength and conveniences of a fortified city."

Josephus mentions "besides a saw and a basket, a pick-axe and an axe, a thong of leather and a hook"

Caesar mentions the hooks:
"caes.gal.7.22": [7.22] To the extraordinary valor of our soldiers, devices of every sort were opposed by the Gauls; since they are a nation of consummate ingenuity, and most skillful in imitating and making those things which are imparted by any one; for they turned aside the hooks with nooses, and when they had caught hold of them firmly, drew them on by means of engines, and undermined the mound the more skillfully on this account,
AND:
"One thing provided by our men was of great service, [viz.] sharp hooks inserted into and fastened upon poles, of a form not unlike
\\ the hooks used in attacking town walls."
John Kaler MSG, USA Retired
Member Legio V (Tenn, USA)
Staff Member Ludus Militus https://www.facebook.com/groups/671041919589478/
Owner Vicus and Village: https://www.facebook.com/groups/361968853851510/
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#8
Quote:
jvrjenivs:3cymyvrt Wrote:Yeah, count me in! And although I also like Matts idea, I don't think that would be duable, although I know there is some more experimental archeology going on by academic re-enactors. But again, short scientific based artickles 'for the re-enactor' would be interesting, but would also lower the interested, I think.

Why isn't it do-able Jurjen? Something official as a guide for reenactors that can span more than one group is definately required. Maybe not so much in Europe, where reenacting is more based on displays than actual living history, but definately in N. America. Besides, it can be an opportunity for the Academics to cross over that bridge, something that I think should happen much more often.

I was not saying that the subject isn't do-able, but I was just thinking the market for such an issue would be to small. As AW certainly has a broader market as purely re-enactors, I thought. Making such a specific special volume would dense your market. But as I tried to mention before I like the idea, there will be interesting stuff in such a special, for sure.

And yes, as you know I don't like the ideas of an ' offcial guide' as in my opinion that will make people lazy and stop researching for their own. And I also have to say I don't second your view about the gap between academics and re-enactors. It is still there, but it's getting smaller every day. Okay, most probably I'm more close to the source so to speak as you are, but at least here in Europe the re-enactors now starts to get credit slowly. And the certainly is because academics now start to see it isn't just about taking a kind of carnaval costume and play in it, but it involse proper reseach and reproduction work.
________________________________________
Jvrjenivs Peregrinvs Magnvs / FEBRVARIVS
A.K.A. Jurjen Draaisma
CORBVLO and Fectio
ALA I BATAVORUM
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#9
Guys, how about you let me decide whether it's doable or not? Suggestions for articles, like John posted, is what I need at this point.
Greets!

Jasper Oorthuys
Webmaster & Editor, Ancient Warfare magazine
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#10
One article could be about colors of paint and dyes and how they were made. This has been a common topic of discussion when talking about painting equipment and dyeing textiles.
for reconstructions. Could be a colorful article!

Another could be about the baggage train. What was carried? Who took care of the train and how were they dressed and armed? What animals and vehicles were used?
John Kaler MSG, USA Retired
Member Legio V (Tenn, USA)
Staff Member Ludus Militus https://www.facebook.com/groups/671041919589478/
Owner Vicus and Village: https://www.facebook.com/groups/361968853851510/
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#11
Quote:I'd personally like to see AW devote an issue to Roman Reenactors, with everything ranging from Drill Commands, to daily soldier's activities, except have it researched by actual academics, and then tested by reenactors prior to being published. Attempts have been made in the past and present to attempt such a feat but has lacked true academic input, vision and experience.
This is one of the best suggestions I have ever seen.
Jona Lendering
Relevance is the enemy of history
My website
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#12
Ancient writers on the Legions(Article title)

An article covering ancient writers who wrote about the Legions. Short descriptions about what they wrote about, when they wrote, how reliable they are considered now,
what translations are available and the difficulties with translations.
John Kaler MSG, USA Retired
Member Legio V (Tenn, USA)
Staff Member Ludus Militus https://www.facebook.com/groups/671041919589478/
Owner Vicus and Village: https://www.facebook.com/groups/361968853851510/
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#13
How about featuring lost articles, archeological items, and drawings?

For example, I've just read the excellent book on Pompeii by Mary Beard, and she talks about colours that were found on statues that then faded- for example one of a citizen in a lorica musculata with a white tunic with a yellow band and a red cloak. Similarly, she features drawings done in the 19th century of Roman frescoes that have now faded.

The Lost Column of Arcadius in Constantinople would be another example. Another would be the Roman helmets destroyed by Allied bombing in WW2. etc etc

This would pull together otherwise unfindable drawings and photographs of items that were found nowhere else. And be very poignant as well.
[Image: wip2_r1_c1-1-1.jpg] [Image: Comitatuslogo3.jpg]


aka Paul B, moderator
http://www.romanarmy.net/auxilia.htm
Moderation in all things
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#14
That sounds an excelleny idea , Caballo - with just one major drawback. Artists of bygone years from the Renaissance to the twentieth century, when drawing these items from the past, happily filled in details that were missing with their imaginations, or with dteails they were familiar with. When the objects still exist, we can check the accuracy of past depictions and copies, but with 'lost' items we have no way of separating fact from fiction...... Sad ?
"dulce et decorum est pro patria mori " - Horace, ODES
(It is a sweet and proper thing to die for ones country)

"No son-of-a-bitch ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country" -GeorgeC Scott as General George S. Patton
Paullus Scipio/Paul McDonnell-Staff
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#15
I'd buy it, do I need to do a PM for a pre-order?
Binoy Fernandez
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