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Finished Linothorax
#31
Quote:Bottom line is that it wasn't that difficult with 24 gauge phosphor bronze.

Have any Greek scales been found? 24 gauge seems very thin, but I'm no expert in bronze. as far as steel is concerned my 14th C medieval group tend to use at least 16 guage for armour (but then it tends to get hit a lot)! Big Grin

Your lino looks gorgeous though! Lauds from me! Big Grin
Pericles of Rhodes (AKA George)
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#32
From everything I have seen from Roman scale finds, 24 gauge is actually on the thicker end of the range. 24 gauge is plenty strong. I was actually worried about it being too thin and after making it, I think I could have even gone a little lighter. I designed their shape off of pictures I have seen of Roman scales without ridges.

16 gauge is pretty thick, but I understand making the scales thicker for SCA since they have their own rules for minimum safety standards. I am confident the 24 gauge would be hard enough to penetrate alone, much less with 14 layers of linen behind them. :lol:

A major difference is that Greeks did NOT have to worry about war hammers, maces, flails, pole axes, etc. I have several polearms from Arms and Armor (Flail, War Hammer, Gothic Mace, Hungarian Pole Axe, Etc.), and they could even do damage to 16 gauge. I have hit 16 gauge commercial bronze sheet with some of them and it wasn't pretty to say the least. Best defense then is to not be there when the weapon hits!
"A wise man learns from his mistakes, but the truly wise man learns from the mistakes of others."
Chris Boatcallie
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#33
Also remember that scales overlap. eg. the amour I'm working on will have three scales over every spot, That provides better protection than a single layer. I went with a mix of 22 and 24 gague because the scales looked fairly thick in the excavation reports, and I think it will be somewhat heavy.
Nullis in verba

I left this forum around the beginning of 2013, but I hope that these old posts have some value
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#34
What can I say that has not already been said - very good job!
John Baker

Justice is the constant and perpetual wish to render to every one his due.
- Institutes, bk. I, ch. I, para. I
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#35
Hey guys, Chris said he made this thread not only to show off his own finished linothorax but also for other people to show theirs. So...lets see your armor!!! 8)
Khairete
Giannis
Giannis K. Hoplite
a.k.a.:Giannis Kadoglou
a.k.a.:Thorax
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#36
I have actually been thinking the same thing. I would love to see some other people's armor. I am especially interested in seeing some of Ouragos Lino's since he has made so many.
"A wise man learns from his mistakes, but the truly wise man learns from the mistakes of others."
Chris Boatcallie
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#37
wow. wow thats all i got. wow Smile
Tiberius Claudius Lupus

Chuck Russell
Keyser,WV, USA
[url:em57ti3w]http://home.armourarchive.org/members/flonzy/Roman/index.htm[/url]
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#38
Well it's not a Linothorax but maybe we'll break the ice if someone starts :-) ) . The idea was to do something different, so I asked myself why not wearing a spoil of war as a Makedonian soldier? A good friend, who has the craftsmanship skills, implemented the idea to real. Based on some different pictures of findings he manufactured a Persian armour for me.
[Image: KallimachosRstung01.jpg]

The armours weight is about 10 Kg. The ornament shows Ahura-Mazda, without head instead with sunbeams. The ornament is dated 4. B.C. and came from an older museum catalog ("Art e Culture en Babylon", Louvre 1964). Ornament is made of brass and covered with beatgold.
[Image: KallimachosRstung02.jpg]

The dedication inscription says "Kallimachos kataleleuse mi en Issous", meaning "Kallimachos plundered me at Issos"
[Image: KallimachosRstung03.jpg]
Kallimachos a.k.a. Kurt

Athina Itonia
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#39
Nice! Are the plates wired together like Lamellar armor or are they attached to cloth behind the plates?
"A wise man learns from his mistakes, but the truly wise man learns from the mistakes of others."
Chris Boatcallie
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#40
The plates are attached to leather, Chris.
Kallimachos a.k.a. Kurt

Athina Itonia
[Image: smallsun1.gif]
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#41
Quote:Opa!!! I see what is coming!!!!
:mrgreen: of course you do!
Kallimachos a.k.a. Kurt

Athina Itonia
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#42
Congrats Kallimachos!!!!!!!! Photots of it being worn? For some reason i cannot add laudes,probably my pc's foult. Now i owe one to you and one to Kineas that i was unable to add yesterday. I love the inscription! 8)
Khaire
Giannis
Giannis K. Hoplite
a.k.a.:Giannis Kadoglou
a.k.a.:Thorax
[Image: -side-1.gif]
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#43
I haven't done some photos yet Giannis but I will. We'll have our next camp in 9 days at www.heuneburg.de I'll post some after that event :-) )
Kallimachos a.k.a. Kurt

Athina Itonia
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#44
I would like to show you this etruscan linothorax.

What do you think it is made of? plates? It looks very thin to me to be metal plates, but don't know...
Javier Sánchez

"A tomb now suffices him for whom the whole world was not sufficient"
[Image: 76946975ce3.png]
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#45
Quote:I would like to show you this etruscan linothorax.

What do you think it is made of? plates? It looks very thin to me to be metal plates, but don't know...

It looks like a depiction of lamellar armour.

Cheers,

Martijn
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