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Your Favorite Roman Latin Quotes Maxims Mottos Sayings ?
#31
Another favorite:

“Naturam expellas furca, tamen usque recurret.”
“You may drive out nature with a pitchfork, but she will still hurry back.”
Horace, Epistulae 1.10.24 or Book I Epistle IV Line 24, circa 20-14 B.C.
AMDG
Wm. / *r
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#32
Quote:
Restitvtvs:3ufvmmat Wrote:“Naturam expellas furca, tamen usque recurret” or “You may drive out nature with a pitchfork, but she will still hurry back.” ~ Horace, “Epistulae” 1.10.24
That's a good one!

I'm wondering why no one has come up with "Infamy! Infamy! They've all got it in for me!" :wink: :roll:
Jona Lendering
Relevance is the enemy of history
My website
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#33
Quote:Perhaps one of you might know if there is a latin antecendant to the Mark Twain quote: "They did not know it was impossible, so they did it!"

For some reason I think there is, but can't source it.

There's one from Seneca which is close:

Non quia difficilia sunt, non audemus; sed quid non audemus, difficilia sunt.
(Seneca, Epistuale Morales 104.26)
It is not because things are difficult that we do not dare; but it is because we do not dare that things are difficult.
Salvianus: Ste Kenwright

A member of Comitatus Late Roman Historical Re-enactment Group

[Image: Praesidiensis-Notitia-av.gif]

My Re-enactment Journal

~ antiquum obtinens ~
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#34
As I often try to re-focus dwindling time, energy, and resources on what matters more, I remember:

Quote:[size=150:887iscyg]Sic transit gloria mundi.[/size]
Based on fundamental principles in the ancient Ecclesiastes, chapter 5.

George Fredericks Watts' related 19th century painting image is attached below.

More positively, rather than lament what I lost or never had, I thank G-d for and try to make the best of what I still do have.

Pax vobiscvm, *r


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
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AMDG
Wm. / *r
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#35
Ave Cives,

I use Festina Lente in my signature. Supposedly, it was the favorite admonishment of the divine Augustus to staff and officials alike. The Literal translation is "Hurry Slowly". The sense of the words are to do everything in a deliberate manner to ensure a job well done. However, some like to point out,..... that in reality Festina Lente was the Roman equivalent of the 20th century US Army Aphorism " Hurry Up and Wait". In that case, I can see Augustus , throwing up his arms in a pique of frustration and muttering " Festina Lente"

Mind you, I don't think that happened too often !

Regards from the Balkans, Arminius Primus aka Al
ARMINIVS PRIMVS

MACEDONICA PRIMA

aka ( Al Fuerst)




FESTINA LENTE
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#36
Quote:Perhaps one of you might know if there is a latin antecendant to the Mark Twain quote: "They did not know it was impossible, so they did it!"

For some reason I think there is, but can't source it.

I thought I had it somewhere:

possunt quia posse videntur
Often translated 'They can because they think they can.', but more literally: They are able because they are seen to be able.' (seem)
It's the Aeneid, Book V, line 231, describing one of the crews in the boat race. If I read it right they come second due to divine intervention!
Salvianus: Ste Kenwright

A member of Comitatus Late Roman Historical Re-enactment Group

[Image: Praesidiensis-Notitia-av.gif]

My Re-enactment Journal

~ antiquum obtinens ~
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#37
Thanks! I thought there was a latin original.
Paul M. Bardunias
MODERATOR: [url:2dqwu8yc]http://www.romanarmytalk.com/rat/viewtopic.php?t=4100[/url]
A Spartan, being asked a question, answered "No." And when the questioner said, "You lie," the Spartan said, "You see, then, that it is stupid of you to ask questions to which you already know the answer!"
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#38
Another Latin quote I like:

“Sed nescio quo modo nihil tam absurde dici potest quod non dicatur ab aliquo philosophorum.”

“Nothing so absurd can be said that some philosopher had not said it.”

(Marcus Tullius Cicero, “De Divinatione” II:119, 44 BC)


Nobody is perfect! :lol:
AMDG
Wm. / *r
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#39
On my "made-up" Coat of Arms it reads Nil Pelea Sine Lucre.

No fight without profit...
Mário - Cerco 21

http://www.cerco21.com - Looking back to see further ahead.
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#40
"Si vis pacem, para bellum"

If you wish for peace, prepare for war
Titius Vedius Medullinus
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#41
religionem imperare non possumus, quia nemo cogitur ut credat invitus
- Theoderic the Great addressing all the Jews of Genoe (Cassiodorus Variae 2,27,2)

(I cannot command your faith, for no one is forced to believe against his will)


On a more nostalgic note from my "compulsory" service (by that time it was choosing really, unlike in my father's time):

[Image: 20kp.th.jpg]
------------
[Image: regnumhesperium.png]
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#42
Romanes eunt domus

Someone called "Romanes", they go, a house.

Actually my favourite is probably:

Ecce. In pictura est puella nomine Cornelia.

This was the first Latin I ever saw. "Ecce Romani" Book I, Scottish classics Group, 1st edition 1971. With my dear old classics master Wm. Michael Wilson (aka "Billy Whizz").
Hello, my name is Harry.
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#43
Quote:Romanes eunt domus

Someone called "Romanes", they go, a house.

Actually my favourite is probably:

Ecce. In pictura est puella nomine Cornelia.

This was the first Latin I ever saw. "Ecce Romani" Book I, Scottish classics Group, 1st edition 1971. With my dear old classics master Wm. Michael Wilson (aka "Billy Whizz").

*LOL*!!!:lol: :lol: :lol:

Harry: Good morning & thank you very much for sharing your favorite Latin quotes.

Monty Python's "Romanes eunt domus" went into passive memory. I'll find & download the wave file to my computer to enjoy at times.

For anyone interested, web search of "Romanes eunt domus" yields links to "YouTube" & other websites with the script of that particular sketch in the movie "Life of Brian" (1979).

Thank you again, Harry, for sharing this!

Pax,
AMDG
Wm. / *r
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#44
While Descartes' version is the most widely known and discussed, I personally like the phrase "Cogitor, ergo sum" better. It means "I am thought, therefore I am" and was coined by philosopher Franz von Baader.

What does it mean to you?
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#45
Besides my byline, of course, I like "Coito ergo sum."
M. Demetrius Abicio
(David Wills)

Saepe veritas est dura.
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