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Accuracy of HBO Series: Rome (would like opinions before buy
#46
Quote:After the second season, I'm not eager for a third. The natural storyline is over (Caesar's rebellion -> Caesar/Pompey civil war -> murder of Caesar -> fall of the Republic at Phillipi -> squabble over which strongman will rule it -> Octavian becomes emperor).

Good point there but hey you never know what they could come up with!!
Out of sight of subject shores, we kept even our eyes free from the defilement of tyranny. We, the most distant dwellers upon earth, the last of the free, have been shielded till today by our very remoteness and by the obscurity in which it has shrouded our name.
Calgacus The Swordsman, Mons Grapius 84 AD.

Name:Michael Hayes
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#47
Plenty of interest in Octavians reign.....Varus, Germanicus, evil Tiberius....
I see plenty to make a good plot..... 8)
Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
Titus Flavius Germanus
Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
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#48
Quote:Plenty of interest in Octavians reign.....Varus, Germanicus, evil Tiberius....
I see plenty to make a good plot..... 8)

God yeah!!The entire teutoburg/germanic thing would be great!!
Out of sight of subject shores, we kept even our eyes free from the defilement of tyranny. We, the most distant dwellers upon earth, the last of the free, have been shielded till today by our very remoteness and by the obscurity in which it has shrouded our name.
Calgacus The Swordsman, Mons Grapius 84 AD.

Name:Michael Hayes
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#49
I thought it was great- sure- inaccuracies as in any production, but then again how many of us can say we are 10000000% accurate in our kit- and at such a smaller scale? Don't forget its not aimed at the small elite of the good old general public who are into the detail that we are- rather a much wider audience.

If the story line sucked for you maybe you should study another period in history a little more colourful??? :wink:

All up IMO, a great effort depicting a period in history we all are into. More -more!
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#50
Exactly! Smile I can honestly say it was the best series I have seen in a long time!
Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
Titus Flavius Germanus
Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
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#51
This from the Hollywood Reporter -- what is interesting here is the news of their original plans for the series had it not been cancelled and where they think they want this to go as a feature. It would seem that they will be dealing with the Emperor Claudius which might spur some movement on the stalled "I, Caludius" feature.


[size=150:2wwbohib]"Rome" might not be history, series creator says[/size]

LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) – The creator of CBS' red-hot police procedural "The Mentalist" has unfinished business in Italy.

Bruno Heller says he wants to produce a theatrical wrap-up to his critically beloved and prematurely canceled HBO drama "Rome."

"There is talk of doing a movie version," he said. "It's moving along. It's not there until it is there. I would love to round that show off."

The lavish period drama ran for two seasons on HBO, which co-produced the series with the BBC. With the final season of "The Sopranos" as its lead-in, the first season was solidly rated, but high production costs presented the network with a tough call on the pickup. HBO opted for a second season to help get more value from its initial investment but not a third, effectively canceling the show in summer 2006 before the second season debuted the following January. The "Rome" sets were destroyed, and the actors were released from their contracts, making the decision all but irreversible.

Season 2 of "Rome" was a surprise. Although slightly lower-rated than the first, the show did remarkably well without a "Sopranos" lead-in. The first season received four Emmy Awards, and another seven Emmys were heaped upon the final season.

Suddenly "Rome" was a Greek tragedy: a hit show with no future. The broadcast networks quickly snatched up the show's leads for their top fall pilots.

HBO executives have since admitted that axing the show probably was a mistake.

One seeming drawback to revisiting the show after its wrap is the demise of a key lead character, Lucius (Kevin McKidd). Yet Heller reveals that the character's off-camera fate was far from fatal.

"It was very deliberate that we saw him drifting away but didn't see him atop a funeral pyre," Heller said.

McKidd has a recurring role on ABC's "Grey's Anatomy." Fellow "Rome" star Ray Stevenson is in "The Punisher," and Polly Walker is cast in Sci Fi's "Caprica."

A feature revival of a defunct series always is considered difficult, though HBO succeeded with "Sex and the City," and Fox's "Arrested Development" is making progress toward the big screen. Heller would not discuss plot ideas, but the original series outline for "Rome" next called for the hedonistic Roman leaders to deal with the rise of a certain problematic rabbi -- a story line that would have put a whole new spin on the Greatest Story Ever Told and potentially bring "Rome" a larger audience.

"I discovered halfway through writing the second season the show was going to end," Heller said. "The second was going to end with the death of Brutus. Third and fourth season would be set in Egypt. Fifth was going to be the rise of the messiah in Palestine. But because we got the heads-up that the second season would be it, I telescoped the third and fourth season into the second one, which accounts for the blazing speed we go through history near the end. There's certainly more than enough history to go around."

Reuters/Hollywood Reporter

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20081201/tv_ ... Z33_hxFb8C

:wink:

Narukami
David Reinke
Burbank CA
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#52
No one said how a lot of the major characters were butchered in this series -- Cicero is portrayed as a mildly-malicious conniving politician; Cato is an ossified old gadfly, etc. The show is good on production values, but its story is atrocious. I love how Romans take a bath in blood in the first episode -- that's the epitome of realism!

Let me spoil the story for you -- the only good "old-fashioned" Roman in the whole series (Vorenus), sells out. An inspiring show you've got here.
Multi viri et feminae philosophiam antiquam conservant.

James S.
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#53
That's odd. Christians were already overly represented in the old movies about Rome (even Burton's Alexander foresaw them!). Why dig them out once again for such a secular series like "Rome"?
I would have preferred to watch Vorenus rising to centurio (or primus pilus?) in Caesar's Gallic campaigns. Or, alternatively, his son joining the Eagles and marching with Drusus to Germania or Tiberius to Illyricum. Many things would be much more entertaining than the same old clichés about Jesus.
Tilman
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#54
Quote:No one said how a lot of the major characters were butchered in this series -- Cicero is portrayed as a mildly-malicious conniving politician; Cato is an ossified old gadfly, etc. The show is good on production values, but its story is atrocious. I love how Romans take a bath in blood in the first episode -- that's the epitome of realism!

Let me spoil the story for you -- the only good "old-fashioned" Roman in the whole series (Vorenus), sells out. An inspiring show you've got here.
Actually, the ritual of taurobolium at the temple of Cybile was historical, although I'm not sure if its attested in the first century BCE. They played it for shock, but one of the best things about the first season is that they showed that Romans are not 20th century Britons or Americans in togas.
Nullis in verba

I left this forum around the beginning of 2013, but I hope that these old posts have some value
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#55
Quote:That's odd. Christians were already overly represented in the old movies about Rome (even Burton's Alexander foresaw them!). Why dig them out once again for such a secular series like "Rome"?
I would have preferred to watch Vorenus rising to centurio (or primus pilus?) in Caesar's Gallic campaigns. Or, alternatively, his son joining the Eagles and marching with Drusus to Germania or Tiberius to Illyricum. Many things would be much more entertaining than the same old clichés about Jesus.

Yes indeed -- there are several other very interesting story lines they could follow rather than the one they have outlined. You name a couple that would certainly work and be something different from the tried & true.

No doubt market "needs" have had an impact on story which, as we all know, is not unusual for Hollywood.

:wink:

Narukami
David Reinke
Burbank CA
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#56
Quote:No doubt market "needs" have had an impact on story which, as we all know, is not unusual for Hollywood. :wink:

Very true, sadly. Anyway, the series took an unusual approach in portraying Rome as a real city with real inhabitants. Okay, there was a good portion of sensation mongering (sex, drugs & crime) and sort of "Dallas" (upper class intrigues and probs) - but in general, it had a different feeling I and seemingly many others had not expected. Hence I'd hoped for them going down the same road with sequels. Well, let's see...
Tilman
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#57
Hell Yeah and a seconded. I watch the series almost once a week LOL the only replacement for the band of brothers and its much awaited sequel I can compare too. what so amazing about Rome the series to me was yes there were alot of inaccuracies, but Bruno's Style was great. A different view.


The great thing about Rome was that alot of what they did was fill in the details of things that were not known.

How was Brutus really eaten up inside by the changing of his friendship to ceaser.

What happened to Veronus and Pullo after there intense meeting outside that faded day in Gaul.

What was Servillia like after her affair with Caesar in his younger years.

And I am sorry but James purefoy as Marc Antony Cmon can anyone say what a great Job he did playing this Role. I have done alot of reading on Anthony, My fiancee calls him my historical Man crush okay that's how bad it is LOL... and he just played the PART. One minute you hated him the next minute you were I want to have a amphora of Wine with this guy.


Also and this is very very underplayed in cricles of discussion about this, But the easter eggs of historical information through out the show.

The 13th DID actually march on Rome, Julius Caeser did die at the feet of the Statue of Pompey, Cassius did die first then Brutus Gave up all hope, Pompey did have his head lopped off in front of the egyption court by a Centurian of a Legion he was serving with. Granted that those of us who study Roman history are the ones that will spot this out but thats the greatness of it. The show as made to initially entertain and not provide fact but they left tons and tons of what I DUB historical easter eggs in the show for almost every scene to correspond with the actual history of the event......

Also I have watched this with several sets of friends most who do not share my taste for Roman history or at least not on my level and being able to tell them what is correct and what is hinted have given them respect for Rome and its Greatness and has kept the history alive. I even caught some of them picking on history books after wards to see what was real and what was not. THAT alone makes this show one of the greats the inspiration to read and reseearch.
Marcus Antonius Gracchus
AKA: Chris Cich
Legate X Legion Historical Group, Wisconsin

"My Soldiers of the Tenth", Caesar yelled, Live up to your tradition of bravery, Keep your nerve, Meet the enemies attacks with boldness and we will win the day".
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#58
I would second that. The same can be said for some novels on the period.
Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
Titus Flavius Germanus
Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
Reply
#59
Im coming in very late to this discussion thats really finished but ive only just joined lol. i really enjoyed the series especially series 1. As it was on tv i decided to ignore the inaccuracies and instead of saying "hey that cavalry bloke has stirrups!" and point out these things i just watched it for entertainment. I bought both series on dvd after watching most of the episodes and thoroughly enjoyed them.
Jeremy Latcham
Quae caret ora cruore nostro?
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#60
Its a great series, but certainly not for the kids. Some of the sexual "situations" may even disgust some adults (I got alittle grossed out once in a while). From what I know of history it's pretty accurate, even if it wasnt the story line is great.

Lucius Vorenus and Titus Pullo were real characters. They are referenced in Caesar's "Commentaries on Gaul". Both were friendly rivals and are said to have left the safety of their fort together during a Gallic attack and to have killed many Gauls together all by themselves and surrounded. Both were able to survive and return to the fort with lots of honor. (its been a while since I read that, but I'm pretty sure thats the accurate story).
Nomen:Jared AKA "Nihon" AKA "Nihonius" AKA "Hey You"

Now with Anti-Varus protection! If your legion is lost for any reason, we will give it back! Guaranteed!

Carpe Dium
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