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Faux-Spartan Black Broth
#1
It's not remotely accurate, but I make Spartan black broth for my kids on occaision. Since they are too into boar's blood, I substitute the fluid from boiled black beans for color. Other than that I vary the ingredients and spices, but always lots of barley.

I thought some educators or reinactors could use this for demonstration purposes.
Paul M. Bardunias
MODERATOR: [url:2dqwu8yc]http://www.romanarmytalk.com/rat/viewtopic.php?t=4100[/url]
A Spartan, being asked a question, answered "No." And when the questioner said, "You lie," the Spartan said, "You see, then, that it is stupid of you to ask questions to which you already know the answer!"
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#2
If you know a butcher they could get their hands on some Blood
"The Kaiser knows the Munsters,
by the Shamrock on their caps,
And the famous Bengal Tiger, ever ready for a scrap,
And all his big battalions, Prussian Guards and grenadiers,
Fear to face the flashing bayonets of the Munster Fusiliers."

Go Bua
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#3
I've never heard of that dish before Paul. Is the broth like a very thick soup? (I imagine it might be because barley tends to do that). I'd love to see the basic recipe ... my grandmother used to make a type of "blood soup" when i was a kid and I wonder if they're similiar.
Sara T.
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Courage is found in unlikely places. [size=75:2xx5no0x] ~J.R.R Tolkien[/size]
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#4
Quote:my grandmother used to make a type of "blood soup" when i was a kid and I wonder if they're similiar.

Hey Sharon Big Grin Spartan black broth was famous- famously unappetizing. It was said that it could only be enjoyed if you grew up drinking the waters of the Eurotas- the river thast ran through sparta.

It was probably a thick pig blood and barley stew. I've had blood and rice sausage, but never soup- though my Mom's Polish family make one of duck's blood. Since both blood and barley conspire to thicken, it may have been really rich. As for spices I use marjoram and basil, sometimes thyme, cuman, or oregano, as well as garlic and onions.

I specifically use the black beans to avoid using the blood, since nobody but me would eat it then, and I'm not to sure about me! I tried squid ink, but the beans are easier. If you have ever had "Cuban" black bean stew or Brazilian fehoda, you'll know how black it can get. People who will not touch a blood stew will eat this- especially for americans, who eat no meat but muscle tissue.

I should warn you that it tastes appropriately unappetizing.
Paul M. Bardunias
MODERATOR: [url:2dqwu8yc]http://www.romanarmytalk.com/rat/viewtopic.php?t=4100[/url]
A Spartan, being asked a question, answered "No." And when the questioner said, "You lie," the Spartan said, "You see, then, that it is stupid of you to ask questions to which you already know the answer!"
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#5
Paul, but I figure if you add enough spices it might be palatable! I would think it is a nutritious dish though, what with the minerals from the blood and the carbs from the barley. Perfect food for a Spartan warrior perhaps!

My Filipino grandma made hers mainly from pig's blood, or chickens if there was no pig at market. She's cooked it slowly in a heavy iron pot with a ton of spices (though i have no idea now what they were). But it contrast to the Greek version, it was famous for being delicious. :wink:
Sara T.
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Courage is found in unlikely places. [size=75:2xx5no0x] ~J.R.R Tolkien[/size]
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#6
Quote:Paul, but I figure if you add enough spices it might be palatable! I would think it is a nutritious dish though, what with the minerals from the blood and the carbs from the barley. Perfect food for a Spartan warrior perhaps!

You're right, this would have been very nutritious. I remember seeing a special on gladiators that showed from an analysis of remains that their diet was mostly barley gruel. This left them more sumo than Swartzenegger where body fat percentages were concerned. We comonly think of Spartans as being lean, but this need not be the case. I'm not talking fat here, but solid, not ripped.

I'm sure the taste is subjective. I was in Japan last year and ate things that I would normally never touch! If it tastes "just like Momma used to make" its always good Smile
Paul M. Bardunias
MODERATOR: [url:2dqwu8yc]http://www.romanarmytalk.com/rat/viewtopic.php?t=4100[/url]
A Spartan, being asked a question, answered "No." And when the questioner said, "You lie," the Spartan said, "You see, then, that it is stupid of you to ask questions to which you already know the answer!"
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#7
I think I saw something similiar about gladiators on the Discovery channel! They followed the life of a specific gladiator from what evidence they could find from his grave and gravestone ... I was very surprised to learn that they ate boring barley gruel. Confusedhock: Lots and lots of carbs so that they could get a wee bit "heavier"! It might have been the same for the Spartan warriors. Smile
Sara T.
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Courage is found in unlikely places. [size=75:2xx5no0x] ~J.R.R Tolkien[/size]
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#8
Many cultures besides Spartans eat 'blood' products. In Scotland, Ireland and Northern England 'Black Pudding' ( a type of sausage made from pig's blood) is very popular to this day, especially fried slices for breakfast...and delicious, as I can attest!

Less seen nowadays is 'Black Broth', a scottish dish consisting of a thick soup made from pig's blood and oats.....a sort of 'black' porridge......
"dulce et decorum est pro patria mori " - Horace, ODES
(It is a sweet and proper thing to die for ones country)

"No son-of-a-bitch ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country" -GeorgeC Scott as General George S. Patton
Paullus Scipio/Paul McDonnell-Staff
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