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Sarmatian (or Scythian) soldiers in the 1st century AD
#1
Salvete,

Were can I find info on the appearance of Sarmatian or Scythian soldiers in the 1st century AD?

What kind of clothes would an archer have worn? Any weapons besides a bow? Armour?

Thanks in advance,
Valete,
Jef
Jef Pinceel
a.k.a.
Marcvs Mvmmivs Falco

LEG XI CPF vzw
>Q SER FEST
http://www.LEGIOXI.be
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#2
Hallo Marcus.


The newest researches found continuity according to , Huns and Scithyan between Hungarians.Their religion, their language their punctuation marks identical. On Hungary the in XIII. hundred a white horse was sacrificed to the gods on a big hill according to a Scythian religion yet. Their armament was identical. It is not possible to talk about obsoleteness. Beside the bow the curve sword and the pointed martial hatchet was important. Their round leather shield defended their back mostly.Was the narrow edge of the martial axe rather was pointed. They attack a head with him, pierced the helmet easily. Yet the in a hundred. XVII. the Hungarian cavalry with used it.On a Hungarian language the hatchet: f o k o s
Vallus István Big Grin <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt="Big Grin" title="Very Happy" />Big Grin

A sagittis Hungarorum, libera nos Domine
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#3
Very interesting info, thanks for that Vallus!

Is there anything known about the equipment of the Sarmatians in the 1st century AD? Any archaeological finds?

Kind regards,
Jef
Jef Pinceel
a.k.a.
Marcvs Mvmmivs Falco

LEG XI CPF vzw
>Q SER FEST
http://www.LEGIOXI.be
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#4
Hallo Jef.

I send you privat message. :lol: The szarmata a fighter's armament changed many times on the river of the times. The principal accessory, which made the mobile tactics possible one, was the complex bow on the steppe. The élite corps the pikkelypáncélos a heavy cavalry got it.The sword complemented this in the close combat and the dagger. The Carpathian Basin szarmaták these weapons were used likewise, but the lance secured an increasingly bigger role. The usage of the shield was taken in contact with the adjacent from Germanic tribes.
Vallus István Big Grin <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt="Big Grin" title="Very Happy" />Big Grin

A sagittis Hungarorum, libera nos Domine
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#5
Thanks very much frater!

I also read in Pausanius that the Sarmatians wore armour made out of horn scales.

I'm wondering about the helmets and the patterns of the swords now... And the shields, were they leather over wicker or leather (hardened) only?

Vale,
Jef
Jef Pinceel
a.k.a.
Marcvs Mvmmivs Falco

LEG XI CPF vzw
>Q SER FEST
http://www.LEGIOXI.be
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#6
If I remember correctly sarmatians wore spangenhelms and introduced also the so-called ring pommel swords in the danube area (where they spread in the roman empire from the late second century onwards)...
Virilis / Jyrki Halme
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#7
" A sagittis Hungarorum, libera nos Domine" The single film which can be seen on the bottom of the side. Looking at you understand it immediately how was like that why fearsome they in Europa at the Scythian,Hun, Hungarian armies.




http://karahun.hu/cgi-bin/karahun/index ... 7&nID=2508
Vallus István Big Grin <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt="Big Grin" title="Very Happy" />Big Grin

A sagittis Hungarorum, libera nos Domine
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#8
Quote:Looking at you understand it immediately how was like that why fearsome they in Europa at the Scythian,Hun, Hungarian armies.

Impressive Confusedhock:

Quote:and introduced also the so-called ring pommel swords in the danube area (where they spread in the roman empire from the late second century onwards)...

I was wondering about this. Did the Sarmatians already have such swords in the first century AD?

Vale,
Jef Pinceel
a.k.a.
Marcvs Mvmmivs Falco

LEG XI CPF vzw
>Q SER FEST
http://www.LEGIOXI.be
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#9
Jef, if you believe Osprey`s "The Sarmatians" the ring pommel sword was used at least from the 2nd C BC bc to 2nd C AD. In fact sarmatians revered the sword plunged to a ground pouring libations on it. Sounds "arthurian"? There you go :wink: ...

Anyway Trajan must have faced this weapon during his campaigns in Dacia. If I just could "stretch" the era forwards when this sword was used by the romans (`till the 4th C AD) I would buy this beauty right away:
http://www.armart.antiquanova.com/image ... 2_full.jpg
Virilis / Jyrki Halme
PHILODOX
Moderator
[Image: fectio.png]
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#10
The shield from hardened leather.
Vallus István Big Grin <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt="Big Grin" title="Very Happy" />Big Grin

A sagittis Hungarorum, libera nos Domine
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#11
Marcvs Osprey have a book The Sarmatians 600BC-450AD witch has a lot of good pics in. On the swords ring pommels upto early 3rd AD then change to stone pommels then on with also disc pommels as well.They are very few scabbard fittings found with swords only scabbard slides.Helmets showen are Spangenhelms similer to the dacian type with the armour mostly portrayed in scale ,as for the horn scale lorica Ill post some pics of the one I was given by my late friend.
Regards Brennivs Big Grin
Woe Ye The Vanquished
                     Brennvs 390 BC
When you have all this why do you envy our mud huts
                     Caratacvs
Centvrio Brennivs COH I Dacorivm (Roma Antiqvia)
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#12
This is great guys! Thanks a lot!

Tony, I take it you would be the man to have such a sword made Big Grin

Valete!
Jef Pinceel
a.k.a.
Marcvs Mvmmivs Falco

LEG XI CPF vzw
>Q SER FEST
http://www.LEGIOXI.be
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#13
Marcus Mummius said:-
Quote:Were can I find info on the appearance of Sarmatian or Scythian soldiers in the 1st century AD?

As well as Pausanias, there is an actual description of the Sarmations in Tacitus at Histories 1.79 describes in detail Rox-Alani incursions across the Danube during the 'Year of the four Emperors':-

"79. Preoccupation with civil war led to some slackness in the face of danger from abroad. The Rhoxolani, a Sarmatian tribe, had cut to pieces two auxiliary cohorts in the previous winter, and they were now encouraged to stage an ambitious invasion of Moesia. Their forces numbered some 9,000 wild and exulting horsemen, keener on booty than battle. These unwary rovers were suddenly set upon by the Third Legion, with its auxiliaries. On the Roman side all was set for the encounter. Not so the Sarmatians. Dispersed for plunder, laden with heavy spoils, and unable to profit by their horses' pace because the tracks were slippery, they were delivered as sheep to the slaughter. It is indeed curious to observe how completely the formidable Sarmatians depend on extraneous aids. An engagement on foot finds them utterly ineffective, but when they appear on horseback, there is scarcely a line of battle that can stand up to them. But this particular day was wet, and a thaw had set in. Neither their lances nor their enormous two-handed swords were of any use, because the horses lost their footing and the dismounted warriors were weighed down by their body-armour. This protective clothing is worn by the chiefs and notables and consists of iron-plating or toughened leather. Proof against blows, it is cumbersome when a man tries to get up after being unhorsed by an enemy charge. Moreover, the Sarmatians were time and time again swallowed up in the deep, soft snow. The Roman troops on the other hand wore breastplates allowing easy movement. They moved up, throwing their javelins or using their lances and, as occasion required, their light-weight swords to close in and wound the unprotected Sarmatians, who do not normally carry shields. Finally, the few survivors took refuge in swampy country, where they succumbed to the severity of the weather or their wounds.

When news of this reached Rome, Marcus Aponius, the governor of Moesia, was granted a triumphal statue, (11) and the legionary commanders Aurelius Fulvus, Tettius Julianus and Numisius Lupus received consular decorations. (12) Otho was delighted, and plumed himself on the victory as if he had won it himself and exalted his country by means of commanders and armies that were his. "


This and Pausanias' description of the chiefs/notables panoplies is closely matched by the 'trophy' armour depicted on the base of Trajan's column. - scale and long leather-banded 'hauberk' style armour, and 'Phrygian' style helmets with nasals. Bosporan graffiti and depictions are similar - conical helmet, corselet of mail or scale ( metal or horn? -probably metal for the better off) kontos/lance, dagger with ring pommel strapped to leg, long sword with round stone pommel, bow and bowcase(gorytus) and occasionally a small circular shield (contra Tacitus). Grave finds confirm this picture, but it should be borne in mind that the majority of the Sarmatians , like the Skythians before them were un-armoured mounted archers.... Smile
Clothes are more problematic - many gilded wooden and metal appliques are found in graves, clothing was the same/similar to skythian, and for colours etc, the Pazyryk tombs are a useful guide....
"dulce et decorum est pro patria mori " - Horace, ODES
(It is a sweet and proper thing to die for ones country)

"No son-of-a-bitch ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country" -GeorgeC Scott as General George S. Patton
Paullus Scipio/Paul McDonnell-Staff
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#14
Tóth Tibor at an anthropologist (1971) we read this: The conquering Hungarians in 896 AD VI. from a century BC. IV. century existed szkithya-szarmata with the former folk of a realm. They are identical genetical. They are not identical with the folks, living beside Ural mountain. Onto your questions you find the answers in the Hungarian history.
Vallus István Big Grin <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt="Big Grin" title="Very Happy" />Big Grin

A sagittis Hungarorum, libera nos Domine
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#15
Quote:Jef, if you believe Osprey`s "The Sarmatians" the ring pommel sword was used at least from the 2nd C BC bc to 2nd C AD. In fact sarmatians revered the sword plunged to a ground pouring libations on it. Sounds "arthurian"? There you go :wink: ...

Anyway Trajan must have faced this weapon during his campaigns in Dacia. If I just could "stretch" the era forwards when this sword was used by the romans (`till the 4th C AD) I would buy this beauty right away:
http://www.armart.antiquanova.com/image ... 2_full.jpg

When you remember that a large draft of Sarmatian heavy cavalry were sent to Britain by Marcus Aurelius after he succeeded in obtaining a peace treaty with the nomadic Sarmatian tribes, the connection to the Arthurian Mythos may not be so very far-fetched.
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