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Sarmatian (or Scythian) soldiers in the 1st century AD
#46
The attack from the leap you can see in that dance is known as "salmon leap", and it is a style known as a characteristic of the warrior women in that area. Another dance that looks somehow similar and it is very old is the "Calusari" in Southern Romania but the "fight" is with sticks and without shields. The "modern" version of the folkloric dance doesn't have a lot of fight , but the original version was much more aggresive. Only men are doing that dance and they are bound by an oath when they form a calusari group. Calusari is an old word meaning horsemen or mounted warriors. Scythians and later Alans, Cumans and Pechenegs are known to have lived there together with the Thraco-Dacians and later Walachians during the migration period.
And another thing, the calusari are wearing a costume that looks familiar to the roman reenactors, you will see why.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BkyAhYFprI
Romulus Stoica

Better be a hawk for a day than crow for an year!
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#47
Did the Romans use Sarmatian archers? And what type of units did they use the most, or, to say it different, what type of unit did the Sarmatians provide most?
Valete,
Titvs Statilivs Castvs - Sander Van Daele
LEG XI CPF
COH VII RAET EQ (part of LEG XI CPF)

MA in History
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#48
Cavalry, both heavy and light.
Romulus Stoica

Better be a hawk for a day than crow for an year!
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#49
Quote:Cavalry, both heavy and light.

...I know Contus armed cavalry, probably Sarmatian were recruited as early as Hadrian's reign, but we don't know if they were dual-armed, though this seems likely. I am not aware of evidence for light cavalry until much later, when Alan archers appear. Do you have evidence for light cavalry earlier? What did you have in mind?


P.S. I sent sketches by e-mail in a form you could enlarge, but my e-mail encountered problems.I then sent two P.M.'s inquiring if you got them O.K. - but these are apparently uncollected? Did you get the sketches O.K. ?
"dulce et decorum est pro patria mori " - Horace, ODES
(It is a sweet and proper thing to die for ones country)

"No son-of-a-bitch ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country" -GeorgeC Scott as General George S. Patton
Paullus Scipio/Paul McDonnell-Staff
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#50
Quote:Cavalry, both heavy and light.

But no archers? In the first century AD, were there local men who offered their services at the Romans? Mercenaries? (Archers?)
Valete,
Titvs Statilivs Castvs - Sander Van Daele
LEG XI CPF
COH VII RAET EQ (part of LEG XI CPF)

MA in History
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#51
Quote:Jonwr I am afraid it is not a ring pommel I have across,the ring like that has to my knowledge not been found,the grip is too long and non have been found that have a diamond cross section blade, but you never know it could be new one Big Grin D
Regards Brennivs Big Grin
[Image: Romans1024-1.jpg]
Tony, how about the 3rd one in that stack?
I read that there was a literary reference to a stone pommel, which is what yours appears to be. Am I right? If so, where was the find, and when is it dated?
Marcus Julius Germanus
m.k.a. Brian Biesemeyer
S.P.Q.A.
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#52
Brian, rock crystal and jade pommels have been found at Dura Europos in Syria. They were propably of sassanian origin from the the 250-60`s Ad...
Virilis / Jyrki Halme
PHILODOX
Moderator
[Image: fectio.png]
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#53
Marcvs I will get back to you Big Grin a bit bysy at the moment.
Regards Brennivs Big Grin
Woe Ye The Vanquished
                     Brennvs 390 BC
When you have all this why do you envy our mud huts
                     Caratacvs
Centvrio Brennivs COH I Dacorivm (Roma Antiqvia)
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#54
Marcvs this pommel was an experiment to see how the sword would handle with a stone pommel, I did not think the owner would like it at first, but he loved it Big Grin D D D
[Image: P1310684.jpg]
Regards Brennivs Big Grin
Woe Ye The Vanquished
                     Brennvs 390 BC
When you have all this why do you envy our mud huts
                     Caratacvs
Centvrio Brennivs COH I Dacorivm (Roma Antiqvia)
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#55
It is my speculative reconstruction of Sarmatian cataphract of the I-II ceturies A.D. Based upon artifacts from grave at Tiflisskaya stanitsa. But added manicae, leg protection and horse armour wich not included in grave materials.
Andrei Negin


«multos castra iuvant et lituo tubae permixtus sonitus bellaque matribus detestata» - Horatius
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#56
Quote:It is my speculative reconstruction of Sarmatian cataphract of the I-II ceturies A.D. Based upon artifacts from grave at Tiflisskaya stanitsa. But added manicae, leg protection and horse armour wich not included in grave materials.

Don't say too quickly 'speculative'. Don't forget they were descendants from the Massagetae, so they must have known arm and leg armour.
During their wonderings on the steppe they only clashed with other nomads. In these clashes the most vulnerable part of the body was their upper body. So they may have dismissed the arm and leg armour then. I am convinced while clashing with the Romans (sedentary people, infantry) they reintroduced the arm and certainly the leg armour, while in these battles the legs were the most vulnerable parts.
Very nice artwork. Would you consider making a reconstruction of a very early saka cavalryman wearing the persian armoured saddle as protection around his legs?
Greetings
Philip
Philip van Geystelen
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#57
"Speculative" only as I used artefacts from one grave for reconstruction, but complete this material with arm, leg and horse armour by literary and iconographic sources. As result not exact reconstruction of the buried warrior. I know several successful artwork reconstructions of heavy persian cavalryman with armoured saddle and I can't complete these with any new details Smile
Andrei Negin


«multos castra iuvant et lituo tubae permixtus sonitus bellaque matribus detestata» - Horatius
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#58
Quote:"Speculative" only as I used for reconstruction artefacts from one grave, but complete this material with arm, leg and horse armour by literary and iconographic sources. As result not exact reconstruction of the buried warrior. I know several successful artwork reconstructions of heavy persian cavalryman with armoured saddle and I can't complete these with any new details Smile

Could you scan these good artworks of persians wearing parapleuridia for me please? I can't seem to find any historically correct ones. Most of the pictures I know of are wearing too wing-like protections.
Seeing your good artwork , I thought an attempt by you would have a great result.
Thanks
Philip
Philip van Geystelen
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#59
OK! I will scan for you from Russian books and will send you by Email as PM. I am not great specialist on ancient Near East (I study roman military equipment), but I something know about eastern armour Smile
Andrei Negin


«multos castra iuvant et lituo tubae permixtus sonitus bellaque matribus detestata» - Horatius
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#60
Quote:Salvete,

Were can I find info on the appearance of Sarmatian or Scythian soldiers in the 1st century AD?

If you speak German, you may want to obtain a copy of:

A. Simonenko, Bewaffnung und Kriegswesen der Sarmaten und der späten Skyhten im noerdlichen Schwarzmeergebiet, EURASIA ANTIQUA 2001, P. 187 et seq.

The article has over 100 pages full of drawings of finds, most of which apparently are otherwise available only in Russian publications and also a few reconstruction drawings.

To me the most surprising fact was that the helmet type best represented was actually the Montefortino helmet with dozens having been found in Russia/Ukraine etc.
Regards,


Jens Horstkotte
Munich, Germany
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