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Battle of Cunaxa Illustration
#46
Thanks Sait

Useful input of the relatively unknown Lykian infantry

Kind regards
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#47
Laus ad te, Laran! The burial techniques in both cases are interesting, as they are part of the local tradition rather than that of Persia (burial in clay coffins, burial in pits in stone tombs, and exposure all seem to have been used in Achaemenid Iran). Perhaps we are looking at the graves of Medized Anatolian aristocrats?

Edit: In case it helps in locating a hard copy of the photos, could you give us the page numbers of all those photos where they aren't obvious? I see they come from Vol. 89 of Arkeo-Atlas, published in 2007. That would also make citing them easier. I may just get these images printed in colour on good paper though!
Nullis in verba

I left this forum around the beginning of 2013, but I hope that these old posts have some value
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#48
Quote: I paint in Adobe Photoshop CS2....
Johnny

Smile D
Sara T.
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Courage is found in unlikely places. [size=75:2xx5no0x] ~J.R.R Tolkien[/size]
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#49
That one relief looks like a pylos helmet with a crest!! Never seen that before! Almost makes me for give my ancestors for using it!!!!!!! Confusedhock:

The idea of thigh protection built into the Horse's armour is interesting!
Have there been archaeological finds of this? It sounds like a real overload of a horse :? shock:

EDIT ***** Sorry about this post, I got reading the thread, and forgot I was only at the start!
Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
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Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
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#50
What's about the armour of the Lykian1 warrior? It seems to consist of a piece for throat and shoulders and a skirt below the waist, the rest of the upper body seems to be naked. Or?

The lower half of the shield seems to have short extensions (feathers?), really strange.
Wolfgang Zeiler
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#51
Quote:
Edit: In case it helps in locating a hard copy of the photos, could you give us the page numbers of all those photos where they aren't obvious? I see they come from Vol. 89 of Arkeo-Atlas, published in 2007.

Actually it's issue 6, 2007. As for page numbers:

- General view of the sarcophagus of the Persian (by the way, it's called Çan Sarcophagus) - page 89
- Detail with battle scene of the sarcophagus - page 84
- Tatarli tumulus north wall - page 79
- Detail with Immortals - page 80
- Funeral panel drawing - pages 80-81
- Battle with Scythians drawing - page 82
- Lykian warrior stele - page 68
- Lykian warrior painting from Kizilbel tumulus - page 69

Regards
Laran aka Sait
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#52
Quote:What's about the armour of the Lykian1 warrior? It seems to consist of a piece for throat and shoulders and a skirt below the waist, the rest of the upper body seems to be naked. Or?

The lower half of the shield seems to have short extensions (feathers?), really strange.

His breastplate looks like an ordinary linothorax.
In Nick Sekunda's book on Persian army, there's a reconstruction of this warrior. According to him, this double-headed spear might be an example of 'spears of Lycian manufacture' mentioned by Herodotus.
Laran aka Sait
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#53
Quote: I'd be very greatful if you can find any other publication or get more images online.

Sean, I managed to find something. Big Grin

An article with details.
http://www.uc.edu/news/sarco.htm

I believe the sarcophagus was published in 'Studia Troica' 11 (2001). Here you can find a reference to the article about it. (on page 11)
http://www.achemenet.com/ressources/sou ... an.SHS.pdf
Hope it helps.

Best regards.
Laran aka Sait
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#54
Thanks Laran. Your information has been very helpful. I managed to get good colour printouts made of those images you supplied at a local office supply store.
Nullis in verba

I left this forum around the beginning of 2013, but I hope that these old posts have some value
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#55
Interesting article.So,this man was probably injured in his first battle?He died in his 20s,and several years after his injury to the left side...
Assuming he was a cavalry man and was so heavily injured in his left side,we can suppose he was not carrying a shield :lol:
It's fascinating how you can re-construct the past of a man by his injuries and,his age,status and way of dying!
Khaire
Giannis
Giannis K. Hoplite
a.k.a.:Giannis Kadoglou
a.k.a.:Thorax
[Image: -side-1.gif]
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#56
Quote:That one relief looks like a pylos helmet with a crest!! Never seen that before! Almost makes me for give my ancestors for using it!!!!!!! Confusedhock:

There are more crested pilos helmets here! Wink
[Image: parsiaqj0.png]
[size=92:7tw9zbc0]- Bonnie Lawson: proudly Manx.[/size]
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#57
Also
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/472508743/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/4412432468 ... otostream/
Not the classical greek pilos,it's etruscan, but it is a pilos possibly worn by italian hoplites.
Khaire
Giannis
Giannis K. Hoplite
a.k.a.:Giannis Kadoglou
a.k.a.:Thorax
[Image: -side-1.gif]
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#58
Hi Giannis !
Liked the photos you posted ! Smile
The helmet type is usually called 'Negau' as you doubtless will have seen, and is peculiar to the Etruscans. It is characterised by its heavy rim and the medial ridge, and is not purely conical like the Pilos.
Like the Pilos, they too can often be crested.
An earlier, less developed Etruscan 'conical pot' helmet is often illustrated - a trophy taken by the Greeks from the Etruscans at the naval battle of Cumae and dedicated at Olympia ( I think).
"dulce et decorum est pro patria mori " - Horace, ODES
(It is a sweet and proper thing to die for ones country)

"No son-of-a-bitch ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country" -GeorgeC Scott as General George S. Patton
Paullus Scipio/Paul McDonnell-Staff
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#59
And if I remember well,some times had high crest,too (so popular to Etruscans and Italian Greeks)
Paul,maybe the wrong thread,but lets bring again the crest issue in greek helmets.
The Italians were generally more wealthy than native Greeks,and this explains why there is so much frequency in crested helmets from Italy.
What about the corinthian helmets though?Some times they seem not to have any indication of crest holder,however there are indeed many times tiny wholes,some times only one tiny whole just on the top of the helmet.Some times there are indications of crest only in the back and one major reason I think why we can't destinguish when a helmet had crest or not in the first glance,is that there seem to co-exist so many ways of attachment. It seems as if each craftsman had his own patent!
I may seem to push things a bit to far, but I'm just tired of atributing EVERY unexplained (yet) matter to artistic lisense.
Khaire
Giannis
Giannis K. Hoplite
a.k.a.:Giannis Kadoglou
a.k.a.:Thorax
[Image: -side-1.gif]
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#60
Yannis may I suggest this to go to the "Helmets" thread?
Kind regards
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