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parma
Quote:no trouble fitting them to flat boards
I agree. But using them this way is a different thing. Regarding how much care and craftsmanship was put into the shields, this seems quite improbable to me.
Quote:due to the spinning process
Although it wouldn´t be a problem (or more or less work) to make them flat in the spinning process, if one wanted to. Would certainly increase the stability of the boss, if fitted onto a flat board. Especially if one thinks of how thin the sheet metal of most of the shield bosses was. A gap between the dome and the board is rather undesireable, since evry strong hit will deform the boss.
Christian K.

No reconstruendum => No reconstruction.

Ut desint vires, tamen est laudanda voluntas.

LEGIO XIII GEMINA

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It is quite difficult to make a flat boss fit a cylindrically curved shield (scutum, e.g.) but it would not be such a difficulty to fit a round, flat boss to a spherically domed shield. The difference is primarily that the geometry of the "dished" part of the boss does not need to change, just the angle of the flange. And a spun boss could just as easily be made with an angled flange.
M. Demetrius Abicio
(David Wills)

Saepe veritas est dura.
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You are right. After that process, then, the boss´s flange would be angled, hence, when found nowadays, angled as well.

As far as reconstruction of infantry shields goes, I´d say on the safe side are those who follow the shield findings we have, which are all either dished or curved (Kasr-El-Harit, Dura Europos, Trier collection). Apart from display on reliefs I do not know any clear evidence for flat infantry shields, and these usually are in frontal view. Relief depicting shields in frontal view is, as I said above, IMO not a usable source for this question.

The Doncaster shield is AFAIK a cavalry shield - about Cavalry shields I so far do not know enough to dare making clearer statements. There seems to have been quite a variety of types. Evidence for this question would probably be found by an analysis of shield bosses from pure cavalry forts. I would expect to find quite a variety of shield forms there during the first century AD.
Christian K.

No reconstruendum => No reconstruction.

Ut desint vires, tamen est laudanda voluntas.

LEGIO XIII GEMINA

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I know that this is slightly OT, but has anyone considered that the curved shield vs flat shield rule of legionary vs auxiliary equipment in the early empire might have applied to parmae as well?

Crispvs
Who is called \'\'Paul\'\' by no-one other than his wife, parents and brothers. :!: <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_exclaim.gif" alt=":!:" title="Exclamation" />:!:

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A domed parma is quite a complex construction project compared to a flat one, that's for sure. A curved oval (like an Augustan scutum) is not so bad, but the curve in both X and Y planes of a domed shield makes it trickier.

Ah, well, so it goes.
M. Demetrius Abicio
(David Wills)

Saepe veritas est dura.
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Quote:curved shield vs flat shield rule of legionary vs auxiliary equipment in the early empire
Where does that "rule" come from, and is it right? What is it based on?
Christian K.

No reconstruendum => No reconstruction.

Ut desint vires, tamen est laudanda voluntas.

LEGIO XIII GEMINA

[Image: BannerAER-1-1.jpg]
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I believe it comes from examination of first century sculpure, particularly funerary sculpture. In this case my information comes from Bishop and Coulston, so perhaps Mike Bishop can comment.

Crispvs
Who is called \'\'Paul\'\' by no-one other than his wife, parents and brothers. :!: <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_exclaim.gif" alt=":!:" title="Exclamation" />:!:

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.romanarmy.net">www.romanarmy.net
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There seem to be two small round shield covers from northern England, I read somewhere today... I´ll post more tomorrow. That was too long a day.
Christian K.

No reconstruendum => No reconstruction.

Ut desint vires, tamen est laudanda voluntas.

LEGIO XIII GEMINA

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