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3rd Century Roman Ivory Ring-Buckle Belt Reconstruction
#1
I am starting a new project, which is the reconstruction of a Dura Europos Ring-Buckle made from ivory, and two studs from the same material.

The first action was to choose the originals from the catalogue:

Then I took the measurements and ordered the raw ivory. As we all should know, ivory is a material which is under the Wahsington law for protection of endangered species. And, I have to add, that is very good. I like Elefants. My choice was to use high-quality mammoth ivory from Sibiria. Having found a vendor, I called him to order the material. The vendor told me, that new ivory is a) cheaper and b) of higher quality. I was slightly puzzled, and asked why. Apparently china buys almost all resources of high-quality mammoth-ivory from Sibiria, so almost nothing of it arrives in Europe. Hence a certified (CITES) piece of recent ivory is cheaper. Weird, isn't it?
It is also legal to buy ivory which was imported BEFORE the washington law was enacted. So I bit into the sour apple (<= German idiom Smile ) and ordered new Ivory. It arrived today and I am very content with the material. In the following I will keep you posted here on the progress of my work.

The Ring-Buckle:
[Image: DSC02041.jpg]

The Studs:
[Image: DSC02042.jpg]
Christian K.

No reconstruendum => No reconstruction.

Ut desint vires, tamen est laudanda voluntas.

LEGIO XIII GEMINA

[Image: BannerAER-1-1.jpg]
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#2
Quote:I bit into the sour apple (<= German idiom Smile)

Not just German! :wink:
But keep us posted by all means! In fact, if you do, I'll nominate you for the Vexillum!
Greets!

Jasper Oorthuys
Webmaster & Editor, Ancient Warfare magazine
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#3
After a few hours of work, the buckle is finished:
[Image: DSC02063.jpg]
This is the drawing of the original:
[Image: DSC02064.jpg]
Ivory is an interesting material. It took quite a while to cut out the basic shape of the ring. I now have much more respect of the craftsmen of old times which were working with ivory...
The ring buckle is so smooth, I'm really fascinated, and it now is really clear to me why ivory was such an expensive raw material throughout history: It is very hard and durable, you can bring it into any shape you want, and it looks good Smile
To cut out the shape I used a Dremel. Everything after that was made by hand, mainly using files, and a hand drill. I polished it with fine sand and linen.

Next to come: Belt studs.
Christian K.

No reconstruendum => No reconstruction.

Ut desint vires, tamen est laudanda voluntas.

LEGIO XIII GEMINA

[Image: BannerAER-1-1.jpg]
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#4
Wow, fantistic work! Confusedhock: , if you don't mind me asking;
what book is that under your ivory block in the picture there??
Brent Grolla

Please correct me if I am wrong.
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#5
Maybe Juergen Oldenstein ?

Caius - Great work !!!

Wish you a lot of success with the 'mushroom studs'

Florian
Florian Himmler (not related!)
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#6
Hi,

Very nice work indeed!

The book is Simon James' catalogue for military finds from Dura Europos, but Caius will have to confirm that.

About ivory:
I'm working in a museum of natural history and I want to express my concerns about promoting the use of ivory for reconstruction purposes. Not every vendor is to be trusted to correctly imply the CITES-rules. So please be careful and respect the rules of protection in the convention of Washington.

Hans
Flandria me genuit, tenet nunc Roma
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#7
What about to use another kind of ivory like ones from walrus or hipopotam? Is legall?

:?:

For little stuff, bone is very similar in appereance.
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#8
The Catalogue is Simon James, Dura.

@ Ivory: As I wrote above: I would have preferred Mammoth Ivory, but it is far too expensive for me. However, I do not think that many people will start to reconstruct in ivory - it is too expensive. A silver belt buckle would have been less than half the price as I payed here for the raw material. Also, the vendor I bought the ivory from is very keen on following the laws...

When I am finished with the studs, I will make the strap-ends of bone. For the buckle and the studs, this was impossible
Christian K.

No reconstruendum => No reconstruction.

Ut desint vires, tamen est laudanda voluntas.

LEGIO XIII GEMINA

[Image: BannerAER-1-1.jpg]
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#9
There are plenty of substitutes out there if you do not, or cannot use real ivory. There is even a product called Ivorex I believe. Its made from real ivory. Its bonded together with some type of resin, or glue. I have seen knife handles made from this, and you could not tell it wasn't real ivory. It even ages, and works like the real thing. You could also try producing this in bone, or antler.

I forgot to add that there are several sources here in the US which you can purchase mammoth ivory, and its not that expensive for something of this size. Also there is a cheaper alternative that gives a good look of ivory. Its tagua nuts http://www.oneworldprojects.com/products/tagua.shtml
"...quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit, occidentis telum est."


a.k.a. Paul M.
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#10
Ave Caius Tarquitius:

I know full well how expensive legal ivory is. That grip blank I got some time ago for my Fulham-pattern gladius set me back some $300.00 U.S. The blank measured 4" long and 1.375" in diameter.

Vale:

Gaius Octavius drusus
Michael Garrity
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#11
Yes... I really don't think I'm starting a wave of
Ivory reconstructions here...
Christian K.

No reconstruendum => No reconstruction.

Ut desint vires, tamen est laudanda voluntas.

LEGIO XIII GEMINA

[Image: BannerAER-1-1.jpg]
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#12
Quote:there are several sources here in the US which you can purchase mammoth ivory
Where are the mammoths coming from? Paleolithic Park?
TARBICvS/Jim Bowers
A A A DESEDO DESEDO!
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#13
Sibiria. Ice. Big Grin
Christian K.

No reconstruendum => No reconstruction.

Ut desint vires, tamen est laudanda voluntas.

LEGIO XIII GEMINA

[Image: BannerAER-1-1.jpg]
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#14
Alaska mainly for the US sources
"...quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit, occidentis telum est."


a.k.a. Paul M.
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#15
Ave Caius Tarquitius:

Before I shipped out to Mesopotamia, I priced the components for a gladius with an all-ivory hilt. The Ivory alone was $1,100.00 U. S. MY first thought was 'ACKKK'

Vale:

Gaius Octavius Drusus
Michael Garrity
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