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Fasti Praenestini -- A Roman Calendar
#1
I wondered if anyone else would be interested in the English text of the FASTI PRAENESTINI, a fragmentary religious calendar with annotations of great value, compiled by Verrius Flaccus, a freedman and noted scholar, not later than C.E. 20 (Flaccus' death). It is named from being inscribed on the hemicycle at the Forum of the Latin city of Praeneste. 

At least one Internet source (a respectable one, and supported by the epigraphist Attillio Degrassi, who suggests 6-9 C.E. notes that all of the anniversaries of Tiberius after C.E. 10 are in a later script and hence are interpolations. He is referred to in an Oxford Classical Monograph on Ovid's Fasti, which is an unfinished poetic commentary on the Roman calendar) suggests the possibility of a commemoration of Augustus' calendar reform of C.E. 6.

A little more information about the Fasti, and Flaccus, is given here:
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/ency...stini.html


English Text (attalus.org is an excellent resource):
http://www.attalus.org/docs/cil/add_8.html

The Latin fragments can be viewed here:
http://db.edcs.eu/epigr/epi_einzel.php?s...-02,+00017

See also the Fragmenta, which only gives the explanatory notes and not the civic and religious status of otherwise unnoted days:
http://www.forumromanum.org/literature/v..._frag.html
Patrick J. Gray

'' Now. Close your eyes. It's but a short step to the boat, a short pull across the river.''
''And then?''
''And then, I promise you, you'll dream a different story altogether''

From ''I, Claudius'', by J. Pulman after R. Graves.
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#2
Very interesting - thanks!

You may also be interested in the calendar contained within the Chronography of 354, which gives the dates in the mid 4th century:

Calendar of Philocalus
Nathan Ross
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#3
Great sources. Thank you both.
AKA Tom Chelmowski

Historiae Eruditere (if that is proper Latin)
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#4
I forgot to include a scholarly criticism of the Kalendar (written from a humanist perspective, so I don't agree with every conclusion, but it is a monument of erudition), Warde Fowler's Roman Festivals of the Period of the Republic:

https://archive.org/stream/romanfestival...0/mode/2up

I possess a physical copy and it is not expensive, besides being well worth having in a more convenient form like this. It draws on all extant fasti as well as on the Latin writers. It is best to use it in conjunction with some or ideally all sources to hand as the primary sources occasionally contradict his commentary, to my mind, while all of them are well worth a detailed study. Ovid's Fasti, some of Macrobius' Saturnalia, the Lingua Latina of Varro, Ab urbe condita libri [The Roman History]by Livy, the Fabulae of Pseudo-Hyginus, some of the Aeneid and the satires of Persius Flaccus are all available in English online if one wants to read them for free. Try archive.org, Perseus, Lacus Curtius and the Theoi Classical Texts Library.

Aulus Gellius' Attic Nights is not, nor are the latter books of the Aeneid, nor the entire English text of the Saturnalia.

Varro and Aulus Gellius are a delight to read -- digressive, discursive, erudite and broadminded. Livy is a master of Latin prose and the Fasti is lovely. For the historical notes to the Fasti of Praeneste see Suetonius' Twelve Caesars, the RES GESTAE DIVI AVGVSTI, the TRISTIA EX PONTO of Ovid and good old Livy, all available free in English. Dio Cassius cannot be got in English online, and Greek scholars are rarer than Latinists, but Loeb copies can be got from [very] good libraries. 

Incidentally, I am deeply in Nathan Ross' debt for the Kalendars of Polemius [Silvius] and Philocalus. There are details there the Fasti of Praeneste lacks.
Patrick J. Gray

'' Now. Close your eyes. It's but a short step to the boat, a short pull across the river.''
''And then?''
''And then, I promise you, you'll dream a different story altogether''

From ''I, Claudius'', by J. Pulman after R. Graves.
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