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Calling all Archers
#1
Hi,<br>
<br>
Does anyone out there use a thumb ring ?<br>
<br>
<br>
Conal <p></p><i></i>
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#2
Yes - I do<br>
<br>
Scythius <p>LEG IX HSPA - COH III EXPG - CEN I HIB<br>
<br>
- FIDELITAS - - VIRTUS - - MAGNANIMITAS - </p><i></i>
Adam MacDonald

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.legio-ix-hispana.org">www.legio-ix-hispana.org
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#3
Hi Scythius<br>
<br>
Can you explain to me how it works please?<br>
<br>
I have pictures but very litttle idea of the finger configuration.<br>
<br>
I am also interested on the "nock" in that in one illustration I have seen this appears as a crescent shaped addition to the rear of the arrow which looks like it is used for ease and speed of placement rather than to grip the string. I presume the fingers would hold it in place until release ?<br>
<br>
Conal <p></p><i></i>
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#4
Scythius, others,<br>
Does anyone know where I can get a quiver for plumbatae? They do not exist as yet, I'm sure of that. It would take some investigation, but I'm prepared to enter into any discussion necessary.<br>
<br>
Valete,<br>
Valerius/Robert <p></p><i></i>
Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR
FECTIO Late Romans
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
[Image: artgroepbutton.jpg]
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#5
Avete, omnes!<br>
<br>
Conal - could you share that illustration with us?<br>
<br>
Scy. <p>LEG IX HSPA - COH III EXPG - CEN I HIB<br>
<br>
- FIDELITAS - - VIRTUS - - MAGNANIMITAS - </p><i></i>
Adam MacDonald

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.legio-ix-hispana.org">www.legio-ix-hispana.org
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#6
I will hook it out over the weekend. I think it was in warefare in the classical world by J Warry ?<br>
<br>
Conal <p></p><i></i>
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#7
Hi Robert,<br>
<br>
always at your service. Just let my have some details, and I will work out something. Contact me via e-mail.<br>
<br>
Cheers,<br>
<br>
Helge<br>
<p></p><i></i>
If you run away from an archer...
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#8
Avete omnes!<br>
<br>
The use of a thumb ring would vary if you draw to your chest or to your cheek (your hand is in a different position). I've use on in a cheek draw, and basically your thumb is horizontal to the floor and drawn back to hook the string on the ring. Your index finger should be hooked vertically down over your thumbnail, and the rest of your fingers will be together under your thumb (Warry does show a Sagitarius ready to fire. You release by "opening" your hand - straighten your thumb while moving your fingers out.<br>
<br>
Two things - your hand motion needs to be smooth, or your release will hook and the arrow will go astray. Also, WEAR A BRACER!!!! or you will discover what "string burn" feels like<br>
<br>
I hope that's clear as mud Mind you, I've only used thumb rings sparingly, as most of my experience is with yumi-no-ya and modern bows (My favorite of course being a 150 lb. prod crossbow with a goat's foot for cocking th' darn thing - great for hunting wild pigs!). The thumb ring bit was to learn how it was used, and it does save some wear and tear on the fingers...<br>
<br>
Optime valete!<br>
Marius Cornelius Scipio<br>
LEG IX HSP COH II EXPG CEN I HIB<br>
FIDELITAS VIRTUS MAGNANIMITAS <p></p><i></i>
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#9
Thi swas in the Warry book. The arrows are shown in a Parthian archers quiver on pages 153/154 or 154/155.<br>
<br>
If that helps<br>
<br>
Conal <p></p><i></i>
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#10
Marius,<br>
<br>
thanks for your interesting comment. I am not an expert on thumb rings, since I use the Mediterranean release, so my knowledge is only theoretical.<br>
<br>
Regarding the 'hooking' of the sting: As far as I understand, the ring, or better its plate, were to protect the thumb against the pressure and friction of the string, just like a shooting glove, not to 'grip' it.<br>
<br>
I agree with you regarding the bracer, if we were talking about the Mediterranean release, but for the thumb ring? The Med release opens in direction of the body, so the string will swing in direction of the bow-arm as it as it pushes the arrow forward. The thumb release opens away from the body so the danger of hitting your arm seems very low.<br>
<br>
Cheers,<br>
<br>
Helge <p></p><i></i>
If you run away from an archer...
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#11
Avete, omnes!<br>
<br>
I will agree with my frater Scipio that wearing a bracer while shooting the yumi-no-ya is a very good idea - but I have not found it necessary when shooting any of the shorter composite bows. YMMV.<br>
<br>
Scythius - who is looking for a new stave to tiller up a simple bow more apropos of his current duty station of Brittannia - too wet for a composite hornbow <p>LEG IX HSPA - COH III EXPG - CEN I HIB<br>
<br>
- FIDELITAS - - VIRTUS - - MAGNANIMITAS - </p><i></i>
Adam MacDonald

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.legio-ix-hispana.org">www.legio-ix-hispana.org
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#12
Hi ,<br>
<br>
so what is the history/archaology behind these ?<br>
<br>
Conal <p></p><i></i>
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#13
You guys may be interested in this reproduction (from a recovered piece) issued by Museum Reproductions in the UK: [link=http://www.museumreproductions.co.uk/images/no21.jpg newwindow]Syrian Archer's Thumb Ring[/link].<br>
<br>
I'm an archer trying work out just what kind of kit a 3rd C Roman archer would have. Can I get away with a yew bow in Roman-Britiain? As a practice bow? With or without horn end pieces? What about uniform?<br>
<br>
Any help appreciated ... <p></p><i></i>
~ Paul Elliott

The Last Legionary
This book details the lives of Late Roman legionaries garrisoned in Britain in 400AD. It covers everything from battle to rations, camp duties to clothing.
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#14
Mithras,<br>
<br>
You will need to be a little more specific with the uniform question. It was a big army. What kind of unit did you have in mind? I am in a 3rd century re-enactment group “Cohors Quinta Gallorumâ€ÂÂ
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#15
Hi, Sassanid, I'm actually Quinta's new recruit - I guess it's a small world ...!<br>
<br>
Most books are dominated by the Syrian archers of Trajan's Column fame ... although I'm sure things were a lot more diverse than that.<br>
<br>
Graham Webster in his very cool <strong>THE ROMAN ARMY </strong> doesn't go into much detail either, BUT he does list most of the legionnary occupations from Justinian's 'Digesta seu Pandectae', which includes a copy of a 2nd century military text. It includes: <em>acuarii</em> - bow-makers and <em>sagittarii</em> - arrow makers - from a list of <em>legionnary</em> occupations.<br>
<br>
Hmmm.<br>
<p>Paul Elliott<br>
<br>
<strong>Heroes of Delphi</strong> - Classical Greece gone D20<br>
<strong>Zenobia</strong> - Fantasy RPG in the Eastern Roman Empire<br>
<strong>Warlords of Alexander</strong> - Kingdoms in conflict for the ruins of Alexander's Empire<br>
<br>
www.geocities.com/mithrapolis/games.html</p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://pub45.ezboard.com/[email protected]>Mithras</A> at: 11/11/03 9:47 pm<br></i>
~ Paul Elliott

The Last Legionary
This book details the lives of Late Roman legionaries garrisoned in Britain in 400AD. It covers everything from battle to rations, camp duties to clothing.
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