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First Roman Castle found at the Mosel
#1
Beneath a medieval castle. 60x30 metres ground plan, 1.8 m thick walls, fortified with 6-7 towers: Erstes römisches Kastell an der Mosel entdeckt
Stefan (Literary references to the discussed topics are always appreciated.)
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#2
Awesome! A frontier Watch-post? Any more pictures, english version?
Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
Titus Flavius Germanus
Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
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#3
Quote:english version?
Google Translate:

First discovered Roman fort on the Moselle

During the routine rehabilitation of a medieval castle town of Bernkastel-Kues, researchers discovered the remains of a massive late-Roman fortress. She was part of the logistics of the imperial city of Trier.

In the second half of the 4th Century AD, wrote of the high Roman officials Ausonius, a hymn to Mosella, as the Romans called the Moselle. In it he says in verse from a trip to Bingium (Bingen) on the Rhine to the imperial residence Augusta Treverorum (Trier), whose graceful position he boasts, and the estates which stretch along the stream.

Ausonius describes the attachment of Bingium, which he presents as a forward Roman bastion for the protection of supplies on the Rhine front, for the Mosel was of great importance. On its shores, in Bernkastel-Kues, archaeologists have now made a remarkable discovery: the remains of a Roman fort, which was probably the first building of its kind in the province of Belgica.

It is a rectangular building measuring 60 by 30 meters, from remedial to the medieval ruins of Landshut came to light. The exposed walls of quartzite stones are 1.80 meters thick, the six or seven towers were six by six feet tall.

"It's a sensational find"

"It's a sensational discovery," said the archaeologist Karl-Josef Gilles from the Rheinische Landesmuseum Trier. On the one hand, because the first time a Roman fastening hill in the Moselle valley was covered with the remains of walls. In addition, about 500 meters was discovered south of the fort an "outpost". "We have since found some coins of Constantine," says Gilles. "Maybe we are just beginning." Perhaps the fort is part of a regular line of mountain fortifications, which secured the Roman line of the Moselle to the country.

In addition, the Fund may at Landshut the localization of "Princastellum" permit. The Roman site is in a text of the anonymous geographer of Ravenna from the 7th Century earlier, the places it into a series of Trier, Neumagen, carding and Koblenz. "We have suspected Princastellum in Bernkastel, but had no proof," says Gilles. That has now changed.
Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR
FECTIO Late Romans
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
[Image: artgroepbutton.jpg]
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#4
Another one here:
http://www.volksfreund.de/nachrichten/re...64,3188136
Nice pics.
Suggested Google Translation ( with a few corrections):
Sensational discovery: Bernkastel's Roman roots
For the first time remains of a Roman fort has been found on the Moselle, and indeed in Bernkastel-Kues. During the renovation of the medieval castle Landshut archaeologists discovered the remains of spectacular.
Bernkastel-Kues: For Achim Wendt, Office of Building Research, Heidelberg,it was a routine-investigation of the Burg Landshut in Bernkastel-Kues. The monument's authorities had ordered it, because the castle should be restored.
But then the archaeologists came towards the remains of a Roman fort probably built in the late fourth century, -- , "en passant". Wendt, who has already dug in Syria, was "floored". "This is the most important find in 25 years' profession."
Even Karl-Josef Gilles from the Rheinische Landesmuseum didn't spare us with superlaives at the press conference which was held at the castle in the presence of many camera crews and journalists. He was talking about a "sensational find". The reasons: First, it was the first Roman fortifications along the Mosel which is to be dated by mural remains. On the other hand it is the "Princastellum". (Translated: first castle is meant in the province of Germania; Remark -- more likely: The foremost castellum at THIS place). So far, this place has only been known from literature of the 8th Century. The name of Bernkastel probably derives from "Princastellum".
For City Mayor Wolfgang Port is clear: "We have to rewrite the history of the city." According to Gilles to more than 700 years of Bernkastel-Kues,there may be more 1000 years adding to this.
The Kastellum on the Moselle is one of at least 19 mountain fortifications, which were, according to Gilles, built above the Moselle River around the 4th Century to protect the emperor's residence in Trier and the Mosel Waterway. The initiator was the first resident in Trier Emperor Constantine I.
The fortress was very strong: The exposed walls of quarzite stones are 1.80 meters thick. The instalation was rectangular, 60 by 30 feet tall. The archaeologists suceeded in reconstruction of the ground plan.
This was made possible, according to Mary Wenzel of the National Directorate of Conservation, since the late Roman plant was built over parts of the medieval castle. "This entanglement of a Roman and a medieval architectural complex as is visible here, is more closely as anywhere else in the Moselle valley, it is unique," said Wenzel.
So far, individual finds as almost perfectly preserved Roman belt fittings have been pointing towards the military use of that mountain spur. In the vicinity of the castle an outpost and Constantinian coins also have been found. Gilles said: "We are just at the beginning of the research, still a lot more will be coming towards us." The scientists assume that there will be further excavations along the mosel-valley.
The town of Bernkastel-Kues wants to make the finds available to the public. With the help of visual aids, multimedia elements, and a theater-play history will be brought forward to the people.
According to Jörg Lautwine from the Mosel-center for visitors says: "The finds greatly enhance the attractiveness of the castle, as will be the Roman Road."
O.K. --- that was rather "quick'n dirty".
Some remarks:
It is not the first late roman fortification on the Mosel that has been spotted and dated
--- it seems both the journalists and the "monuments-authorities" went a bit "hollywood- route". Neumagen-Dhron is well researched, Trier-Pfalzel is also a late roman fortification (and a palace) not tomention numerous hilltop-forts.
It is rather the first late roman fortification along the Mosel that has been clearly spotted under amedieval castle. Gilles had already been pointing towards this place as early as 1985 *. (With reference to the belt-fittings found there)

@ Robert: the series of locations mentioned in the "Welt-online" paper is Tier, Neumagen, Koblenz and Treis-Karden -- mutilated by Google Translate.

* Karl-Josef Gilles: "Spätrömische Höhensiedlungen in Eifel und Hunsrück/ Late-roman hilltop-forts in Eifel and Hunsrück" , p109f / p279, Trier 1985 (!) and I think he's already published on that before,but I can't remember when and where.

Greez

Simplex
Siggi K.
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#5
Thanks Siggi.

Quote: This was made possible, according to Mary Wenzel of the National Directorate of Conservation, since the late Roman plant was built over parts of the medieval castle.
Rather, the other way around - Medieval goes over Roman buildings.

Quote:So far, individual finds as almost perfectly preserved Roman belt fittings have been pointing towards the military use of that mountain spur.
One can hope for some plumbatae finds.. :wink:
Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR
FECTIO Late Romans
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
[Image: artgroepbutton.jpg]
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#6
Quote:Rather, the other way around - Medieval goes over Roman buildings.
Confusedhock: :oops: :roll: Tired old man, me !

Robert, I took chances going through Gilles' book from 1985 again today.
Lots of spear-tips and tips of catapult-bolts as well as arrow-tips but no barbed tips at all.
But that book is from 1985, like I said and the finds' situation may have changed drastically since then. Unfortunately Dr. Angelica Hunolds' book on the Katzenberg at mayen does a quite concise roundup about late-antiquities' hill-top fort in (the) Gallia(s) and Germania I, but with nearly no references to small finds.
There have been some "intermediate" publications after 1985 on that topic, namely that one from Steuer/Bierbrauer from 2008 (DeGruyter -- and tooooo daaaarn expensive,-- can't afford that !!! :evil: )but also from "our protagonists" Karl-Josef Gilles and Raymond Brulet, both having "pushed the envelope" here since the beginning of the 80's.
To give an idea of the "grand scale" of the topic :
Dr. Angelika Hunold lists about 165 places "up-hill" securedly having or at least most likely having fortifications from late antiquity ( i.e 270-450AD) -- in Belgium, France, Germany and Luxemburg -- of diverse sizes "build-quality" and dating.
So BTW the statement of 19 more forifications like that to be found is quite more than
a mere "educated guess" and in fact quite adequate. And Otto Piper's "standard" on Castles ("Burgenbau") from the late 19th century already had stated that there may well be a roman fortification under each medieval castle along Rhine and Mosel.
(He did go more "low profile" about that in later issues of that book, but as it begins to show now: that was not too far from reality)
So : do expect more to come !

Greez ( A bit more awake now)

Simplex
Siggi K.
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#7
Siggi, as ever: thank you!!
Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR
FECTIO Late Romans
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
[Image: artgroepbutton.jpg]
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#8
I'm always "going for the real thing" --
so here is "da offischial propaganda":
http://www.denkmalschutz.de/3966.html

Google translates about this :
Sensational discovery of the ruins of Landshut
Press conference to present the excavations for Princastellum in Bernkastel-Kues

Abstract: At a press conference at Landshut (castle) in Bernkastel-Kues on Wednesday, 13 June 2012 at 11.00 clock are Dr. Karl-Josef Gilles, State Museum Trier, and Achim Wendt, head of the Office of Building Research, documentation and design (BDK) in Heidelberg, its findings to the discovery of the local "Princastellums" before and answering questions to the historical architectural sensation of last month. The medieval ruins of Landshut, once known as the impregnable fortress of the archbishops of Trier, is one of over 120 projects , that has been funded by the Bonner Heritage Foundation,established in 1985, thanks to private donations and (further)funding by the Glücksspirale (lottery)and the Pension lottery by "Lotto", --- in Rhineland-Palatinate alone.

Long version: On occasion of a press conference at Landshut (castle) in Bernkastel-Kues on Wednesday, 13 June 2012 at 11.00 clock Dr. Karl-Josef Gilles, State Museum Trier, and Achim Wendt, head of the Office of Building Research, documentation and design (BDK) at Heidelberg, are presenting their findings about the discovery of the site of the eponymous "Princastellum", answering further questions about last months historical architectural sensation.

A loose mural crowning and the risk of further damage to the outer masonry layers on the kennel walls of the ruins of Landshut in Bernkastel-Kues,district of Bernkastel-Wittlich, had necessitated last year's renovations at the medieval castle, at which the German Foundation for Monument Protection (DSD) had shared fundings of 50,000 €.
Now the works at both the eastern and western flank (of the castle)led to the discovery of the extensive remains of Roman walls , mentioned by the Geographer of Ravenna as "Princastellum". The rectangular installation of 60 x 30 meters with up to 2.40 meter thick walls, was one of at least 16 mountain fortifications above the river (Mosel), which were created at the beginning of the fourth century to protect the imperial residence in Trier. "Princastellum", the (ancient) name of Bernkastel, was therefore the "first fort" in the Roman province of Belgica. That stronghold seems to have been reinforced further even (as late) as in the 5th Century.

The remains of the castle of Landshut are situated high above the city. A fortress of the Provost Adalbero was built in this place by 1000. A further fortification of the Counts of Bliescastle (there), dating to the 12th century, was (later) destroyed by the archbishop of Trier. When the area fell to the Electorate of Trier in 1280 Archbishop Henry of Vistingen rebuilt it.This castle existed until 1692. It's fortifications were considered impregnable, and it was finally by just one accident caused by fire that she fell victim to. Even in the "French war" in 1674 the castle was successfully defended against 2,000 men. The fortifications (visible today) came from Henry's successor Bohemund von Trier, who paid for the pillars, walls, towers and battlements, to help the city to get a higher prestige. Preserved today are parts of the castle walls, the circular wall of slate quarry stone, -- up to the battlements. Even the 30-meter high circular keep in the southern corner of the enclosure has been preserved. Finally two arched vaults and a staircase can be seen in (original) wall thickness. To the east, the remains of the palace are close. An outwardly projecting gatehouse is located in the northwest corner.

The ruins of Landshut, which today is used as a tourist restaurant, is one of over 120 projects in Rhineland-Palatinate alone, that has been funded by the Bonner Heritage Foundation, established in 1985, through private donations, (further) funding from the Glücksspirale and the Pension Lottery by "Lotto". These include the Evangelical Church at St. Goar, the former synagogue at Niederzissen and the Church of Our Lady, Oberwesel.

Bonn, 11 June 2012/Schi

Hey, how did Google really "translate" ?!

Hmmmm, would I have been faster by NOT using Google Translate ? Confusedhock:

BTW: Did you notice : 1) walls 2,40m wide 2) at least 16 further mountain fortification
now : see above : what is correct ??
The "usual wear" of news ??

Greez & Goodnight (yes -- good night :roll: )

Greez

Simplex

I'll be watching the news for further infos
Siggi K.
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#9
Have you tried Bing Translator? It seems pretty good.

Have any of the Belt fittings been published?
Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
Titus Flavius Germanus
Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
Reply
#10
Thanks for that "bing" one, Byron.
I'll try that later on.
What do you mean by "published" : papers on it or just pics ?
In the later case, as mentioned above:
Quote:Karl-Josef Gilles: "Spätrömische Höhensiedlungen in Eifel und Hunsrück/ Late-roman hilltop-forts in Eifel and Hunsrück" , p109f / p279, Trier 1985 (!)
Page 279 fig 1-7 are the (metal) parts of the belt in question.
If you need that, pm me your eMailadress and I'll scan that for you.

Greez

Simplex
Siggi K.
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#11
Update.
Seems I found the "Master"-paper on that find along with 1 more (good) pic.
http://www.gdke-rlp.de/, then go to "Aktuelles" >>>>>>>"Pressemitteilungen" >>> 17.06.2012 (right now the third from top, but this may change -- its with the pic where's the blue umbrella is shown.) >>> "lesen Sie weiter" ....and... presto ... here it is.
Ahhh, and YES --- hail Caesar (!) bing translator is WAY better, thanks again.
I couldn't find serious flaws at a "quick lookover" so I'm posting that unaltered. :wink:
This one's going to save me precious time --- and sleep !! Cool
HERE:
EDIT : A slightly amended translation of the GdKs-Press-Release:
17.06.2012 | Important find | Bernkastel-Kues
Important find of the local Archaeology: the Roman high-altitude fortifications on Castle Hill in Bernkastel-Kues

The external fortifications ("kennel") on the castle ruins of "Landshut" castle at Berncastel-Kues are being rebuilt since 2009 under the supervision of the GDKE (General Directoratefor cultural heritage, stately office for monumental conservation, Mainz)
The Office For Research, Documentation and Design (BDK) under the direction of Achim Wendt (Heidelberg) has been in charge of this for expert guidance. In the course of preparation for this year's restoration campaign on the eastern side of the Castle he (Wendt) noticed unusually massive remains of a Roman fortification integrated into the medieval kennel (Zwinger, still standing upright.

In cooperationwith the local archeological authorities under the direction of Karl-Josef Gilles the investigations were extended to a number of further probes around the entire installation to clarify the scope and the exact dating of the Roman fortification. Now, a first conclusion can be drawn. The investigations will continue at a later date.

History of research
In his thesis about "Late-roman hill-top settlements in Eifel and Hunsrück" from 1985 Karl-Josef Gilles had covered already 14 hill-top fortifications located above the Moselle river. By new finds, their number has now grown to 19. Previously, only four places had been known. Until then, there had not been any closer consideration regarding previous fortifications under Medieval castles . Only „surveys by foot“ along the slopes below that medieval castles had provided numerous finds of late Roman pottery sherds (Rem.: and coins) on the surface .
They served as an indication that in the construction of the medieval Castles the Roman layers of older previous fixtures had been levelled to the slopes by and large.

One of these places has been Landshut castle at Bernkastel-Kues. To this came that during trenching works below the northern tip of the Castle before 1940 (more than) seven-fitting-partsof a military belt were discovered, originating presumedly from a burial. Comparable military belts are depicted on the Arch of Constantine at Rome.

These different finds from various places do suggest that they (=these places) served less as a haven in troubled times, but rather were part of a military concept,which provided for the errection of a chain of such fortifications on easy-defendable mountain spurs and ridges in the Mosel valley . Initiator of this system was the first emperor residing at Trier, Constantius I Chlorus (293-306), who had these installations built around presumedly 300AD for the protection of the traffic on the Moselle river and of the new imperial residence . Speaking for a n erection systematically conceived is that the facilities on the lower Moselle especially do exhibit an almost uniform spacing of around 5 Roman miles (7.5 km) „intermitting“ from bank to bank.

Constructional findings
The newly discovered remains are certainly older than the Castle errected after 1276 and the two previous castles from the 10th to the 13th century, mentioned in written sources, alike.
To these (two) castles, a few single stray pottery shards aside, none oft he newly discovered mural remains can be attributed for now.
This massive masonry of hard-to-work quartzite stones is reminiscent to the construction technology of late antique fortifications at the upper Rhine and the Danube-Iller-limes. Exceddingly unsual, however, is that it has it’s square towers built diagonally into to the courtain wall, for which there is no direct comparisons of the late antique fortification system - and even more so in the medieval castle constructions. At most the late Roman Forts at Altrip near Ludwigshafen, Vemania/Isny-Bettmauer or the fortlet of Passau/Boiotro show distant similarities.
According tot he recent findings the fortification at Berncastel may be reconstructed in rectangula, albeit slightly
trapezoid shape of 60m x30m size, into which five- probably six square towers of 6 x 6m outlines were intergated diagonally (Rem.: See further posting for that!) into a courtain wall of 1,80 m average width.
Eastward to the northeastern(corner-) tower another smaller tower has been exposed, probably marking a gate system with it. We may assume the entrance here during (late) antiquity.
Three (maybe four) post-holes traced aside the northeastern tower, of which one was filled with „roman material“,may have formed a part of an even older gate-system here.
Currently only few informations can be given about internal buildings.
The pottery found, and that means newly excavated finds as well as older ones, stretcesh from from early 4th to late 5th century. Quite obvious is a high percentage of roman fine pottery (Terra Sigillata). This table pottery with its distinctive red coating amounts to nearly half oft he total pottery finds, which is characteristic for military installations. These dishes exhibit chequered decorations made with roll-stamps.
Further remarkable finds are a glass-sherd with inlayed small-thread(ed) spiral ornaments, dating tot he times around 400 and some pre-historical finds, a thin-necked hatchet out of clay-slate and handmade pottery sherds, giving rise tot he presumption that this mountain spur was in use before roman times.

Historical resumee.
The castle of Bernkastel is the first mountain fortification in the Moselle Valley, whose size and floor plan we know better. Contributed hereto for a good part has the fact, that the remains from late roman times have only partially been built over by the core oft he medieval castle and large parts of the western and eastern flanks o fit have been preserved inside the walls of the late medieval kennel.
It easily comes to mind, to associate the newly dicovered fortification with the „Princastellum“mentioned in the „Cosmographia“ oft he „Ravenna Geographer“. His words are:“ ….also lie along the river Molsella, which we have mentioned in „Francia Rhinensis“ (Rhine Frankia), the places …. Treoris (Trier/Trevers), Nobia (Neumagen), Princastellum (Bernkastel-Kues), Cardena (Treis-Karden), Cobulantia (Koblenz).“
That unknown geographer wrote his "description of the world" in the first decades of the 8th century, while he has been using older sources. Because he is calling Worms and Speyer „Allemanic Cities“, he apparently describes the situation in the times before the victory of the Frankish king Clovis I of the Alamanni in 496AD.

"Princastellum" could be interpreted to be "primum castellum", the "first castle" in the province of Belgica, and at the same time the name given to the later Bernkastel. The border to the province of Germania II crossed the Moselle somewhere downstream of Bernkastel at a place still unknown. That newly discovered Castrum would be , after Trier, Neumagen, Bitburg, Jünkerath and Wederath, just the sixth place in the region of Trier, where an ancient name has been delivered from antiquity to a present days location.

Press Conference
Under strong participation from the media, the findings of the excavation were (finally) presented to the public on Wednesday, 13 June 2012 at 11 am in a press conference at Landshut castle. First, results, expectations and perspectives with regard to the interesting and historically significant excavation results were given to the participating persons and institutions at the castle’s restaurant. As a follow-up, opportunity was given to follow the technical explanations of Karl-Josef Gilles, made at the place of the exposed remains of the late Roman walls outside the castlewalls, which was taken well by the public present despite the pouring rain. The strong media echo showeditself in numerous releases of News- Agencies,in press-reports and TV recordings, all of which were spread in a short time predominantly by the online issues of the participating media.
END


Simplex

So,now I'm going to "digest" my recent find.

Edit:
Ahhw ahww that BING has its very own maladies.
I'm going over this again as soon as time permits.

Edit:
Very interesting: Square towers diagonally built into the courtain walls !
That's why the pics show a faintly strangely built layout of the wall visible.
[Image: b7c211fe77.jpg]
Edit 3 :
Amended Translation
Siggi K.
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#12
Quote: Update.
Seems I found the "Master"-paper on that find along with 1 more (good) pic.
http://www.gdke-rlp.de/, then go to "Aktuelles" >>>>>>>"Pressemitteilungen" >>> 17.06.2012 (right now the third from top, but this may change -- its with the pic where's the blue umbrella is shown.) >>> "lesen Sie weiter" ....and... presto ... here it is.
Very nioce article, thanks for the link.

Quote:Ahhh, and YES --- hail Caesar (!) bing translator is WAY better, thanks again.
Apparently there's always room for improvement.
A few:
"Spätrömische elevated settlements" - Late Roman hill settlements.
"which originally probably came from a body's grave." - inhumation.
" Initiator of this system was the first in Trier" - the first emperor residing in Trier.
"Glasgefäßes" - glass vessel.
"Fadenspiralen" - I don't know that! Aaargh (falls into the gorge of Eternal Peril)
"Cardeña (machines)" - Cardena (Karden).
Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR
FECTIO Late Romans
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
[Image: artgroepbutton.jpg]
Reply
#13
Quote:"Fadenspiralen" - I don't know that! Aaargh (falls into the gorge of Eternal Peril)
mit aufgelegten Fadenspiralen, 'with applied spiral thread (decoration)', perhaps.
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#14
Hi Robert,
....thanks I KNEW somebody would help me out. Cool
My suggestion for ...Fadenspiralen.. would be = inlayed small-thread(ed) spiral ornaments

Just an (more or less)" educated " guess. :mrgreen:

I'll keep "hunting" for still more information on Bernkastel.

Greez
Siggi K.
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#15
Quote:Hi Robert,
....thanks I KNEW somebody would help me out. Cool
My suggestion for ...Fadenspiralen.. would be = inlayed small-thread(ed) spiral ornaments

Just an (more or less)" educated " guess. :mrgreen:

I'll keep "hunting" for still more information on Bernkastel.

Greez

Any info on the terra sigillata they've found would be appreciated :wink:
Moi Watson

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Merlot in one hand, Cigar in the other; body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming "WOO HOO, what a ride!
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