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portraying a legionairi 1st century AD,
#16
I can't imagine why they are being unhelpful.
Have you asked Crispus? He is the biggest proponent
on leg wraps on the planet, if not the universe.. :wink:
As for the tunic issue, well, that may prove trickier, unless you go down the
manicae route.
But ask Crispus, who is also a member of this forum. Smile
Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
Titus Flavius Germanus
Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
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#17
they are not being unhelpful just very hard too get hold of Big Grin think their emails must still be 100AD format lol , i am eager to get started on my own kit


Adam
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#18
If you want some (oblique) evidence you could always quote Tacitus - Histories, II.20 has the Vitellian commander Caecina leading the Rhine legions into Italy in AD69 wearing a multicoloured 'celtic' cloak (versicolori sagulo) and trousers (bracas). If a senatorial legate was kitted out like that, his troops could easily be wearing something similar! Tacitus doesn't mention his tunic, but as others have pointed out the Gauls at this time seem to have worn long sleeves, so that isn't outside the realms of possibility either Wink
Nathan Ross
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#19
Hello Adam

You could have a look through my book, 'Roman Military Dress'. I put everything I could find relating to military clothing in that.

On the face of it it would appear that being a third century legionary would be a better option for you as they wore long sleeved tunics and trousers but sadly they do not look like the "classic" Roman legionary at that date.

There is practically no evidence that earlier first century imperial troops wore long sleeved tunics, trousers, knee length bracae, leg wrappings, leg bindings or Celtic inspired clothing however popular they may all be with modern re-enactors.

Analogies with more recent periods or even other Roman periods would suggest that soldiers did adopt or adapt other clothing items on campaign but although occasionally a couple of Roman writers liked to criticise some senior commanders for wearing local clothing (although whether they actually did or not or whether the writer was making a barbed point, we will never know for certain), they never bothered to say if ordinary soldiers followed suit.

Likewise Roman art of the period never shows Roman soldiers wearing anything other than the standard clothing items. Written accounts would suggest that in cold weather the early imperial period Romans wore more Roman style clothing first, rather than adopt local fashions. So two, three or even four square type tunics rather than one long sleeved one. Equally there are also references to undercloaks and overcloaks.

The square leg wrappings and the strip type leg bindings mentioned in other posts appear frequently in later Roman art, sometimes even worn by soldiers. However there is nothing to suggest they were worn earlier by infantry or cavalry, although common sense might imply that they did. Remember though that most campaigning would take place during the summer months.

This is of course not helping you very much. The arm guard is one idea but it only covers one arm, equally you could wear a greave on one leg, although again there would be an argument as to when it would be acceptable for an ordinary soldier to wear one. Bandages for covering minor wounds is perhaps one other option possibly done in such a way that they are not obviously meant to be standard bindings or wrappings, although they would probably look very similar.

I hope this helps a bit.

Graham.
"Is all that we see or seem but a dream within a dream" Edgar Allan Poe.

"Every brush-stroke is torn from my body" The Rebel, Tony Hancock.

"..I sweated in that damn dirty armor....TWENTY YEARS!', Charlton Heston, The Warlord.
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#20
it could also be said that art from that period was done to setreotype a legionarii, so the art work its self offers suggestion and not absolute proof,
this is really not helping much, what i want to know is which re enactgroups would accept the one or more of the suggested ideas so i can portray a legionarii, not Auxillary

Adam
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#21
Adam,

I have sent you a PM.

Crispvs
Who is called \'\'Paul\'\' by no-one other than his wife, parents and brothers. :!: <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_exclaim.gif" alt=":!:" title="Exclamation" />:!:

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.romanarmy.net">www.romanarmy.net
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#22
I have a similar problem... Smile With my knobbly knees, trousers are de rigeur for me. So I re-enacted the 3rd and 4th centuries for years, but I yearned to wear segmentata and carry a curved scutum ...

I'm dabbling in Hadrian's era, with a short tunic, but wearing a local long sleeved tunic beneath it British style, short trousers (bracae - found on the Tropeum, circa 100AD) and leg-wraps.

But I'm not part of a strict set-period group (its multi-period Roman)and can please myself. I do know that when the general Severus brought his troops into Rome in 193AD, the population was shocked by their barbarian appearance, which can really only mean barbarian dress, ie. long trousers and long sleeved tunics. These guys had been on the Danube frontier for decades fighting the Marcomanni Wars (166-180AD) and I doubt they adopted this garb in 193, but in the decades leading up the Civil War.

So, a mid-late 2ndC legionnary would be very do-able, wearing long sleeves and trousers, IMHO Wink
Paul Elliott

Legions in Crisis
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/17815...d_i=468294

Charting the Third Century military crisis - with a focus on the change in weapons and tactics.
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#23
i got the problem sorted now yay, many thanks for all of your help Big Grin


Adam
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#24
Do tell! :-)
Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
Titus Flavius Germanus
Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
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#25
Yes please Smile
Paul Elliott

Legions in Crisis
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/17815...d_i=468294

Charting the Third Century military crisis - with a focus on the change in weapons and tactics.
Reply
#26
basically i gonna use a manica on my right arm , bandage on my exposed left forearm , as approved by my group , as some one said there we are not the actual roman army and this is a hobby ,if the bandage is mentioned by a member of public i will be honest ,


Adam
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#27
DSC makes a very nice manica in both brass and steel, after softening up the leather with some neatsfoot oil it is very flexible. Avoid the current Deepeeka model for a legionary impression.

DSC Brass Manica
[attachment=3975]0410021756a.jpg[/attachment]


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
Quintus Furius Collatinus

-Matt
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#28
This is the versions I am looking at Matt, the deepeeka just doesnt cut it
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#29
I am very happy with mine, just keep in mind it is armor and will limit some movement. I can still draw my sword and thrust, but don't think you'll still be able to scratch your nose wearing it lol. Keep that in mind if you plan on wearing it for hours at a time
Quintus Furius Collatinus

-Matt
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#30
Adam, glad to hear you have the problem solved! See you at an event sometime.

@ Matt, in the photo, is that before or after neatsfooting it?
With mine the limit to the movement is a pain in the A.. but then I havent treated the leather.
I have 2 from A gent called Walpole, which I intend to leather and use to see if there is a difference. I plan on using some buffalo hide I have as it is very soft.
Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
Titus Flavius Germanus
Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
Reply


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