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Hammer marks?
#1
Hi everyone,


I have to talk about Roman hammer marks on iron in my coursework.


I have to talk about what Roman iron which was worked with a hammer felt like and how it was worked.


Is there anyone out there who could tell me anything about what worked Roman iron work feels like and what texture it has, especially with hammer marks?


Many thanks!
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#2
Well, best is to get a copy of
"Roman Imperial Armour: The production of early imperial military armour"
by D. Sim and J. Kaminski, 2011 (ISBN 9781842174357)

All your questions are discussed in there.
________________________________________
Jvrjenivs Peregrinvs Magnvs / FEBRVARIVS
A.K.A. Jurjen Draaisma
CORBVLO and Fectio
ALA I BATAVORUM
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#3
Beat me to it Jurjen :wink: !

Catherine...<gentle poke>...photos of hippo sandal???
Moi Watson

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Merlot in one hand, Cigar in the other; body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming "WOO HOO, what a ride!
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#4
Another good book is
Iron for the Eagles: The Iron Industry in Roman Britain by David Sim and Isabel Ridge
Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
Titus Flavius Germanus
Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
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#5
Quote:Beat me to it Jurjen :wink: !

Catherine...<gentle poke>...photos of hippo sandal???

And I second that gentle poke! :p
________________________________________
Jvrjenivs Peregrinvs Magnvs / FEBRVARIVS
A.K.A. Jurjen Draaisma
CORBVLO and Fectio
ALA I BATAVORUM
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#6
Quote:Another good book is
Iron for the Eagles: The Iron Industry in Roman Britain by David Sim and Isabel Ridge

Brilliant book. The best! (on iron working ...)
Paul Elliott

Legions in Crisis
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/17815...d_i=468294

Charting the Third Century military crisis - with a focus on the change in weapons and tactics.
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#7
Hi Catherine,

Well, you could very well buy those books, but if you are in a rush, perhaps I can help, being a Roman blacksmith.

The iron the Romans used was different to the iron (more often mild steel) commonly used today. It was called wrought iron and contains little carbon. It does contain slag and can be spotted by its "rope like" stucture. It is softer to work with then mild steel and can be forgewelded with comparative ease.

A blacksmith does leave hammermarks, but when working carefully tends to avoid them and these are then flattened out. These left are more often then not taken out by the secondary proces of finishing. Then there is the corrosion, which also blots out hammermarks. It very much depends on what object you are reviewing, but I have seen very few objects which show clear hammermarks. Very utilitarian objects of low value, like hinges, may have them, but are usualy so corroded there is little to no chance of spotting them.

I am adding a pair of handcuffs I did, hardly any secondairy work was done on these, just a quick sanding to remove the firescale from the forge.


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Robert P. Wimmers
www.erfgoedenzo.nl/Diensten/Creatie Big Grin
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