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Greek Hoplite Marching Kit
#1
I'm sure it has been discussed here many times, but what was the Hoplite's marching kit? From what i have found it looks like they had a large shoulder bag, a net bag for food and extra items, and a water container. Where can I get these components from? For instance the water container; what would they be made of, ceramic or leather, personally Id use leather it wont shatter. What would they carry in their shoulder bag, and where can I get a net bag made with proper materials to any Greek era? Id like to portray an Ekdromoi possibly, at the moment all I have now is a helmet, all I need now is an accurate shield and spear set, I might go without a sword as I guess that not everyone had those in the Classical or Hellenistic eras.

I'm also considering just being a slinger in some re-enactment group, cheaper anyways but i still have a Hoplite helmet though, I have seen Greek slingers being portrayed wearing sun-hats, where can I get those from? Will I have to make my own? ahaha sorry guys, I have a lot of questions, one more thing is there any Greek re-enactment groups in Washington, possibly in Seattle or anywhere in that state, I live in Alaska and want to go to the nearest state possible to save money
thanks
James
this is what I have found its from a site called hoplologia, looks pretty reasonable to me; a bag, net bag, and canteen
http://www.hoplologia.org/handbook/doku ... _equipment
James Andrew
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#2
The liquid container can be ceramic, wooden, or skin.
The Osprey books on ancient Greece have photos of the ceramic container and some traders here make copies.
The "wineskin" type is another option.

Sword was not the first item bought but a dagger is fairly OK.
The one depicted in the site you mentioned comes from Corinth other types existed.

You can try this site also for info
http://www.4hoplites.com/

Kind regards
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#3
Quote:The liquid container can be ceramic, wooden, or skin.
The Osprey books on ancient Greece have photos of the ceramic container and some traders here make copies.
The "wineskin" type is another option.

Sword was not the first item bought but a dagger is fairly OK.
The one depicted in the site you mentioned comes from Corinth other types existed.

You can try this site also for info
http://www.4hoplites.com/

Kind regards

Stefanos,

What form would the wooden canteens take? Any sources in particular mentioning them? You have peaked my interest.....

-Adam C.
Gaius Opius Fugi (Adam Cripps)
Moderator, Roman Army Talkv2
Forum Rules: http://www.ancient-warfare.org/index.php...view=rules
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#4
There you go :

http://www.kollina.gr/ekthemata/014.jpg

There are also flat drum-like versions

Plus dried pumpkin as a water container
http://culture.samos.gr/FILESYSTEM/CIVI ... IT1834.jpg

Kind regards
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#5
Thanks Stefanos! That wooden one is awesome...is it carved in two pieces, hollowed out, and pieced back together? I'm familiar with the pumpking/gourd as a canteen, as I use them a lot in my other impressions...but that wooden one, I just want to make one right now Big Grin . Thanks!

-Adam
Gaius Opius Fugi (Adam Cripps)
Moderator, Roman Army Talkv2
Forum Rules: http://www.ancient-warfare.org/index.php...view=rules
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#6
Sorry

No knowledge in the construction.

Kind regards
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#7
Take a look at <!-- l <a class="postlink-local" href="http://www.romanarmytalk.com/rat/viewtopic.php?f=63&t=29834">viewtopic.php?f=63&t=29834<!-- l for some ideas.
John Conyard

York

A member of Comitatus Late Roman
Reconstruction Group

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.comitatus.net">http://www.comitatus.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.historicalinterpretations.net">http://www.historicalinterpretations.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com">http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com
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#8
There is a great discussion on hoplite kit in a relatively new book on Xenophon's Anabasis entitled "A Greek army on the march: soldiers and survival in Xenophon's Anabasis" by John W.I. Lee. It can be found on Google Books here:

http://books.google.com/books?id=gSq00X ... q=contents \\&f=false

Take a look at chapter 5, "The Things They Carried."
Ruben

He had with him the selfsame rifle you see with him now, all mounted in german silver and the name that he\'d give it set with silver wire under the checkpiece in latin: Et In Arcadia Ego. Common enough for a man to name his gun. His is the first and only ever I seen with an inscription from the classics. - Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian
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#9
cool man, I think Ill order that book
James Andrew
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#10
Where can someone find a good net bag for sale at a decent price?

I would also recomend Venitian Cat Pottery for the canteen. I have several of her pieces and they are all great.

Edward
Edward Lindey

A horse is a thing of beauty... none will tire of looking at him as long as he displays himself in his splendor.         Xenophon

 
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#11
It is rather easy to make a net. A quick internet search will show you how.
John Conyard

York

A member of Comitatus Late Roman
Reconstruction Group

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.comitatus.net">http://www.comitatus.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://www.historicalinterpretations.net">http://www.historicalinterpretations.net
<a class="postlink" href="http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com">http://lateantiquearchaeology.wordpress.com
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#12
I have a photo on my harddrive at home of the kit a slave is carrying for his hoplite master, I will post it later on today.
Paul Elliott

Legions in Crisis
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/17815...d_i=468294

Charting the Third Century military crisis - with a focus on the change in weapons and tactics.
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#13
This is a vase painting of a slave following a hoplite (sorry, don't know the source!).


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
Paul Elliott

Legions in Crisis
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/17815...d_i=468294

Charting the Third Century military crisis - with a focus on the change in weapons and tactics.
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#14
Thanks for posting that! The representations of the marching packs are quite few and i hadn't seen this one! The yoke is clearly visible(painted in white),as is the basket to counter balance the rolled bedding. I wonder why almost all representations of the servants-save for one- are caricatures. I know of at least two vases and one sculpture where the servants with the marching kit are theatrical caricatures. Where they a typical theatrical character? I don't remember the marching pack mentioned specifically in Aristophanes,although of course slaves are always present.
Khaire
Giannis
Giannis K. Hoplite
a.k.a.:Giannis Kadoglou
a.k.a.:Thorax
[Image: -side-1.gif]
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#15
Quote:I wonder why almost all representations of the servants-save for one- are caricatures. I know of at least two vases and one sculpture where the servants with the marching kit are theatrical caricatures. Where they a typical theatrical character? I don't remember the marching pack mentioned specifically in Aristophanes,although of course slaves are always present.
Khaire
Giannis

Yes, the soldier's servant was a common character in Comedy. Though I don't think that many (any?) mention is made of them in extant Old Comedy, they feature quite prominently in New Comedy alongside the 'Miles Gloriosus' character. I've found several mentions of equipment and marching kit in fragments of New Comedy. See in particular Diphilus, "The Madman" (Ho Mainomenos), 55:

Quote:And then escharan (brazier), klinen (mat), kadon (a vessel for liquids), stromata (blankets), tagenon (a frying pan), askoperan (bag), thulakon (pouch)! So that no one would accept that you are a soldier, but rather a Round walking straight out of the agora, so much petty stuff do you carry around.
Ruben

He had with him the selfsame rifle you see with him now, all mounted in german silver and the name that he\'d give it set with silver wire under the checkpiece in latin: Et In Arcadia Ego. Common enough for a man to name his gun. His is the first and only ever I seen with an inscription from the classics. - Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian
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