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Pictures of Numantia
#1
Around January a friend of mine and myself went on a trip and we managed to visit Numantia in north central Spain. Here some shots of the excavation site itself.<br>
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<img src="http://www.inmobelnet.com/blitz/numancia1.jpg"/><br>
A reconstructed Numantine dwelling on the site itself.<br>
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<img src="http://www.inmobelnet.com/blitz/numancia2.jpg"/><br>
A general view of the area which is very nicely explained through pannels and easy to navegate with those walkways. The modern building in the background is the actual audiovisual center. Nearby the Obelisc errected in the late 1800´<br>
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<img src="http://www.inmobelnet.com/blitz/numancia3.jpg"/><br>
A reconstructed part of the original wall<br>
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<img src="http://www.inmobelnet.com/blitz/numancia4.jpg"/><br>
A second rebuild dwelling along the lines of those build in the village after it had falled already under Roman power.<br>
All rebuild houses can be visited inside and display a whole reconstructed household.<br>
<br>
<p></p><i></i>
[Image: ebusitanus35sz.jpg]

Daniel
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#2
In the nearby town of Soria you can visit the Numantine Museum which collects artifacts found all around the region.<br>
<br>
<img src="http://www.inmobelnet.com/blitz/numancia5.jpg" style="border:0;"/><br>
The description states this is a roman helmet found around Numantia.<br>
<br>
<img src="http://www.inmobelnet.com/blitz/numancia6.jpg" style="border:0;"/><br>
Different angle<br>
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<img src="http://www.inmobelnet.com/blitz/numancia7.jpg" style="border:0;"/><br>
<br>
<img src="http://www.inmobelnet.com/blitz/numancia8.jpg" style="border:0;"/><br>
Those Celtiberian daggers do look like the Pugio.<br>
<br>
<img src="http://www.inmobelnet.com/blitz/numancia9.jpg" style="border:0;"/><br>
Another general shot from the Numantine ruins. I have pointed out in the picture the site of one of the excavated Roman forts that went around the besieged town.<br>
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<br>
<p></p><i></i>
[Image: ebusitanus35sz.jpg]

Daniel
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#3
Gratias multas, Ebu, for posting these shots. What a great site! And that openwork dagger scabbard-- amazing! Is this a Roman scabbard, or Celtiberian? And the top three rows of openwork definitely spell something-- can anyone decipher it?<br>
<br>
T. Flavius Crispus<br>
Legio VI VPF<br>
CA, USA <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p200.ezboard.com/[email protected]ytalk>FlaviusCrispus</A> <IMG HEIGHT=10 WIDTH=10 SRC="http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/legiovi/vwp?.dir=/Flavius+photo&.src=gr&.dnm=flavhead2.jpg" BORDER=0> at: 3/19/05 4:27 pm<br></i>
T. Flavius Crispus / David S. Michaels
Centurio Pilus Prior,
Legio VI VPF
CA, USA

"Oderint dum probent."
Tiberius
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#4
The openwork scabbard is from a late Roman (late fourth, early fifth) military hunting knife of the Simancas type. The inscription goes on the maker's name (now I cannot remember...) it starts ES (sic, it should be EX) OFFICINA...)<br>
I own a replica based on that sheath. I've already posted it and I'll try to post it again tomorrow or perhaps next Monday...<br>
<br>
Aitor <p></p><i></i>
It\'s all an accident, an accident of hands. Mine, others, all without mind, from one extreme to another, but neither works nor will ever.

Rolf Steiner
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#5
Roman military remains were quite scarce in the museum itself. I did not find those Numantine Pilum heads Connolly wrote about in his book nor did I see anything about that alleged Leather segmentata piece the Italians of arsdimicandi were talking about. <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p200.ezboard.com/bromanarmytalk.showUserPublicProfile?gid=ebusitanus>Ebusitanus</A> <IMG HEIGHT=10 WIDTH=10 SRC="http://fla.fg-a.com/spainC1.gif" BORDER=0> at: 3/19/05 5:09 pm<br></i>
[Image: ebusitanus35sz.jpg]

Daniel
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#6
Most of the Roman material unearthed by Schulten in the early years of the 20th C was apparently taken back to the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum in Mainz.<br>
I cannot remember whether it is on display there -- perhaps one of our German colleagues can confirm this? <p></p><i></i>
posted by Duncan B Campbell
https://ninth-legion.blogspot.com/
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#7
Did you happen to see any arrowheads or sling bullets? I would be interested in anything on archery or slinging.<br>
Thanks<br>
Johnny <p></p><i></i>
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#8
Those photos are absolutely beautiful! Thank you for posting them. The Simancas knife scabbard with the open-work is gorgeous. My friend Aitor's scabbard looks almost exactly like it! Those were beautiful knives, and more handsome to me than even the pugio, which is in itself a classic, elegant weapon. <p>Lucius Aurelius Metellus, draconarius, Secunda Brittanica<br>
www.greeneknightforge.bravehost.com </p><i></i>
Lucius Aurelius Metellus
a.k.a. Jeffrey L. Greene
MODERATOR
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#9
That helmet, is that not a Attic Greek Helmet of the republic? This model here.<br>
<br>
<img src="http://www.deepeeka.com/store/catalog/helmets/helmets_images/6062b.jpg"/> <p></p><i></i>
[Image: ebusitanus35sz.jpg]

Daniel
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#10
Could it have belonged to a Celt-Iberian?<br>
Johnny <p></p><i></i>
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#11
The second photo shows what appears to be a Feather Tube.<br>
I also only see one crease and not the extended version that is in the depeeka photo. hmmm. <p>Valete,<br>
<br>
Dave/Cicero<br>
<br>
www.freewebs.com/seguntienses/index.htm</p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p200.ezboard.com/bromanarmytalk.showUserPublicProfile?gid=davekufner>Dave Kufner</A> <IMG HEIGHT=10 WIDTH=10 SRC="http://www.freewebs.com/davekufner/pics/daveicon3.JPG" BORDER=0> at: 3/21/05 3:03 am<br></i>
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#12
Here it is:<br>
<img src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v110/tribunus/Simancas.jpg" style="border:0;"/><br>
I think that the inscription reads (botton to top): 'ES OFICINA IANVARIVS'<br>
I changed it on mine for 'VTERE FELIX' but now I think that I should have used the armourer's name, a Roman one, by chance, 'PLACIDVS'. But then my friend was still alive...<br>
<br>
Aitor<br>
<br>
<p></p><i></i>
It\'s all an accident, an accident of hands. Mine, others, all without mind, from one extreme to another, but neither works nor will ever.

Rolf Steiner
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#13
I think that attic helmet could have perfectly belonged to a celt-iberian warrior, though the iberian mediterranean shore was full of Greek and Phoenician trade settlements, which later became Roman and Punic bases. <p>Ivan Perelló<br>
MARCVS CAECILIVS FAVENTIANVS<br>
<br>
<img src="http://geocities.com/ivarmaelstrom/septimaniseniores2.jpg" style="border:0;"/></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p200.ezboard.com/bromanarmytalk.showUserPublicProfile?gid=faventianvs>FAVENTIANVS</A> <IMG HEIGHT=10 WIDTH=10 SRC="http://www.geocities.com/ivarmaelstrom/septimaniseniores2.jpg" BORDER=0> at: 3/23/05 6:15 pm<br></i>
[Image: 120px-Septimani_seniores_shield_pattern.svg.png] [Image: Estalada.gif]
Ivan Perelló
[size=150:iu1l6t4o]Credo in Spatham, Corvus sum bellorum[/size]
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#14
Really? I thought it was actually quite a problem to find Iberian helmets and surely the republican roman troops (Triarii) besieging Numantia would have worn such pieces. The museum description said "Roman" in any case. <p></p><i></i>
[Image: ebusitanus35sz.jpg]

Daniel
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#15
Aitor--<br>
<br>
WOW! That dagger scabbard is a hummdinger. I'm experiencing a bad case of "dagger envy."<br>
<br>
Question: How do we know this is a "hunting dagger," and not a military one? By the fourth or fifth century, with the proliferation of private armies et al, was there a difference between "civilian" and "military" weaponry?<br>
<br>
T. Flavius Crispus <p></p><i></i>
T. Flavius Crispus / David S. Michaels
Centurio Pilus Prior,
Legio VI VPF
CA, USA

"Oderint dum probent."
Tiberius
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