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Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - Printable Version

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Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - damianlz - 11-03-2012

There is a very well done blog that sprung up a week or so called "Pass the Garum" which explores recipes and provides step by step wrecipes, photos, noted 9and some good humor) regarding Roman dishes.

Link here
http://pass-the-garum.blogspot.com.au/


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - Epictetus - 11-03-2012

That's a great blog. Hopefully they keep it up. I see they had the same reaction to Cato's bread that I did. And they made tracta! I've wanted make placenta, where you use tracta, and I see this is on their agenda. That recipe is so confusing (to me, at least) I couldn't figure out how to do it. Now maybe I'll learn.


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - Vindex - 11-03-2012

That's an excellent link, thank you!


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - Gaius Julius Caesar - 11-03-2012

And where is the Garum???? No recipe?
I imagine Worcestershire sauce may be descended from it!


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - Kegluneq - 11-04-2012

Very nice link! Cato's bread looks to be on my level so will give that a try tomorrow Smile


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - damianlz - 11-04-2012

I hope it works and is delicious to all of you! I've only tried the bread thus far and pulled out every topping I could imagine, onlives by FAR were the best side/addition to the bread


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - Decimus Brutius Varus - 11-08-2012

Quote:And where is the Garum???? No recipe?
I imagine Worcestershire sauce may be descended from it!

I had never thought of it that way, but I reckon you might be right!


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - Kegluneq - 11-08-2012

Quote:I hope it works and is delicious to all of you! I've only tried the bread thus far and pulled out every topping I could imagine, onlives by FAR were the best side/addition to the bread
I tried it with 'soft cheese with garlic and herbs' (care of Tesco) - closest I could get to authentic moretum at short notice! It worked extremely well as a topping, although my bread turned out rather dense and heavy. Although that itself might be more historically appropriate.

How exactly would Roman bread have been eaten? The wedges cut from the traditional wheel loaf make for very chunky sandwiches and I assume that would be anachronistic anyway.

Worcestershire sauce seems closer to the original Asian ketchups, in that they are a mix of ingredients for flavour with the fish sauce providing a salty distinctive base. I think Thai fish sauces like Nam Pla are closer to the original garum, although I've not been brave enough to try them in anything other than a stir fry so far.


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - Simplex - 11-09-2012

Ahwww yessss
Finally a thread who brings it down to the real necessities ! ;-)
Food, meal, chow , happa-happa ......yessssssss ! :cheer:

Greez & Thanks

Simplex


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - Semisalis Abruna - 03-11-2013

Robert Matthew wrote:
Quote:my bread turned out rather dense and heavy

I used to have that problem with spelt bread, I've found that if you leave it to prove for 12 - 16 hours (instead of the 2 hours on the recipie on the bag) it comes out much lighter and less like lead.


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - PassTheGarum - 03-12-2013

I had a chat with Sally Grainger (of The Classical Cookbook fame), and she reckons it was likely eaten hot out of the oven, when it didn't feel as 'dense'.

You're certainly right about the benefits of letting it prove for a while though.


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - Kegluneq - 03-12-2013

Quote:I used to have that problem with spelt bread, I've found that if you leave it to prove for 12 - 16 hours (instead of the 2 hours on the recipie on the bag) it comes out much lighter and less like lead.
Ah, thanks for that, will try that next time. We generally try bread right out of the oven (why wouldn't you!), but I know I'm doing something consistently wrong, I never have luck with making bread!


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - agrimensor - 03-12-2013

I recently had the idea that the military bread more looked like the chapati ( Indean bread). The reason is that you can bake it
in a frying pan (like pancakes) and you yust need water, flower,salt and some oil to bake it.


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - Epictetus - 03-12-2013

Quote:
Semisalis Abruna post=332862 Wrote:I used to have that problem with spelt bread, I've found that if you leave it to prove for 12 - 16 hours (instead of the 2 hours on the recipie on the bag) it comes out much lighter and less like lead.
Ah, thanks for that, will try that next time. We generally try bread right out of the oven (why wouldn't you!), but I know I'm doing something consistently wrong, I never have luck with making bread!

Does "to prove" mean you let the dough sit, so natural yeast takes hold? I made some of Pliny's grape juice bread which required the dough, or perhaps I should call it starter, to sit for a number of days.


Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog - Kegluneq - 03-12-2013

Quote:Does "to prove" mean you let the dough sit, so natural yeast takes hold? I made some of Pliny's grape juice bread which required the dough, or perhaps I should call it starter, to sit for a number of days.
It's the time you leave yeast to take hold period - it applies with dried yeast as well. Basically the time it takes left in a warm place to expand. Part of me wonders if I'm just not leaving it in a warm enough location.

Are you referring to a sour dough?