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Full Version: An Interesting Observation with Cabbages
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We we're doing a bit of weapons practice last evening. As killing the local Celts is generally frowned upon we decided to improvise and mount two white cabbages (79c each at Tesco, target providers to the emporer since.....er, last night) on a vertical pole to simulate the belly and head areas of a typical vegetable fed Celt (Don't fire until you can see the whites of their cabbages).

Oh yes, we had great fun chucking Pila at them, chopping them up with our Gladii and even poking them with our Pugii (Pugio's Smile ) Anyway, as the evening and the slaughter of the innocent vegetables progressed, quite a lot of debris mounted up under the poles, until eventually the inevitable happened, a man slipped an near brained himself on the now slippy ground.

Now that was only cabbages. Can you imaging what it would have been like to try and keep your footing on blood and offal drenched soil. I can well imaging many a man met his fate as a result of slipping in such conditions.
Quote:Pugii (Pugio's Big Grin )
pugiones, just as an fyi...
Glad to hear you survived!



My friend and I had to defend our position against marauding vegetables once. We made short order of leftover Halloween pumpkins with our 12 gauge shotguns. I must admit we thought we were going to be overran at one point, but thanks to 00 buckshot we prevailed.
I can tell you from experience that it is not a good idea to hand out a crate of very juicy oranges to a platoon of bored tankers on a hot day. The resulting melee, forever to be known as the Battle of Citrus Hill, rendered all four tanks and their crews a slippery yet sticky mess. More injuries were caused by slips and falls than by ballistic impact. The plague of flies that followed was an unforseen torment.
Well I've spent about half my working life covered in oil-based mud, so I don't need to much imagination to realise what it is like!
Mind you, the fly's don't thrive for very long! Or the little birds. Or the bigger birds. Confusedhock:
Hmmmm there seems to be something wrong with this picture......... :roll: :evil:

Don't you just love the oil companies.....hope thats not too political! :wink:
Quote:Well I've spent about half my working life covered in oil-based mud,


I thought that you had quit that dodgy nite club job Byron?? :wink: :wink:
:lol: :lol: :lol:

Actually, I recall seeing a picture somewhere in the past of a re-enactor on horseback, hacking at a cabbage with a spatha, IIRC. Anyone know who that was? I think it was a british group, but could be wrong.
Quote:Actually, I recall seeing a picture somewhere in the past of a re-enactor on horseback, hacking at a cabbage with a spatha, IIRC. Anyone know who that was? I think it was a british group, but could be wrong.

The Ermine Street Guard at Aldborough, Summer 1999.
Easy there Gaius I believe there are three of us in this thread that has sold our souls to the petro industry :wink:
Well, I won't hold it against you! :lol:

And you will know I speak the Truth! 8)

And speaking the Truth in the oil industry is what leaves me unable to afford to attend an event at the other end of this small but fair Island! :evil: But this could be leading to modern politics, so I will say no more. :x
You know, I think I now know why the Romans were unable to conquer Germania...just try to chop up Sauerkraut (or zuurkool, as we latter-day Batavians call it)

You can't! The slippery stuff just doesn't provide a honest, chunky target, like Celtic cabbages...
Quote:Now that was only cabbages. Can you imaging what it would have been like to try and keep your footing on blood and offal drenched soil. I can well imaging many a man met his fate as a result of slipping in such conditions.

If nothing else he had a hell of a laundry bill after the battle :lol: But I would point out one thing- blood and its associated fluids clot and become sticky quickly when outside the circulatory system, so the ground might not have been so slick as one might suppose- as well, unless an artery is struck, piercing injuries don't necessarily release a lot of fluid at any great rate, and as well, earth and vegetation would do a good job of soaking a lot up...
What about the excretia from opened bowls? Confusedhock:
I disagree Matt. I have been around too many animals being slaughtered and the blood remains very slippery. Especially on any kind of grass, or bare earth.

There are too many descriptions from ancient battles of stomachs being opened, and limbs being lopped off. If I recall correctly the Romans were impressed at the devistating effects of the gladius Hispanieus blade with it removing limbs. This would lead to a great amount of gore to deal with on the battlefield.
And if I recall correctly, the greeks were equally horrified by the results! Confusedhock:
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