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Full Version: Horns: corna, buccinae and the like
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I'm doing some research on how music was used in battle from 200 BC - AD 200.

I was wondering whether anyone has experience with reconstructions of corna or buccinae, and if they do, what their impressions are about how they might have been used in battle.

In particular, I would be interested to know how one plays them, and also if different notes can be played by changing the pursing of one's lips.
Yes, you can get different notes by changing the lips on the mouthpiece, much like any other horn. The type mouthpiece is the key to some of the variations, we have a cornu reproduction we used at the AD43 event each year. They play like any 'brass' instrument.

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Here you could find another resent topic on the Cornu (and reconstructing one)

And here another topic about the Deepeeka Cornu
Thanks for the help! I find it very interesting that at least 4 different notes, and up to 8 could have been played. So when the ancient texts refer to "blasting the war note" perhaps they're talking about one of the several notes they can play.
Please note:

a cornu is the G-shape horn
tuba is the T-shape horn

all lituui date to medieval times that have been found

bucina is still be discussed what it exactly was, my oppinion is a natural horn

(so exactly the other way round, like some CDs explain.) :wink:
Quote:all lituui date to medieval times that have been found

Sorry Susanna, what is a lituui?
:?

Thanks,
Quote:what is a lituui?
Not a lutuui, a lituus. :wink: It's a trumpet-like instrument.
Quote:bucina is still be discussed what it exactly was, my oppinion is a natural horn

Is the bucina mentioned as being used by soldiers somewhere in the sources?

Vale,
Sorry, lituus is one piece.

Buccina prima, buccina secunda...signals inside a military camp.
I will be home next week and write the sources here then. :wink:
Quote:Is the bucina mentioned as being used by soldiers somewhere in the sources?

Vegetius, II.22 is a great passage:

"The music of the legion consists of trumpets, cornets and buccinae ... The classicum, which is a particular sound of the buccina or horn, is appropriated to the commander-in-chief and is used in the presence of the general, or at the execution of a soldier, as a mark of its being done by his authority."

Hope that helps :wink: