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Full Version: Clear and detailed photos of the Arch de Orange
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Ave,

I am looking for photos in close detail of the Arch de Orange. I have been able to find overall photos, but none in detail.

In particular, the detail of the soldiers shield with the Capricorn figure..I believe it is from Legio XX Augustus (correct me if I am wrong please..)

Any and all help is welcome and well appreciated. I am going to use this information as documentation on a scutum design.
Salve Amice!

I don't know if you saw this site, but they have dozens of close-ups of the different reliefs on the arch. This will probably be the best you can find short of taking the photos yourself. Good luck!

fotografie dell'arco romano Orange by Giovanni Lattanzi
Ask and ye shall recieve...and how...

Laudes to you Peter and thanks a million....
If you look at the cavalryman in the back, on this photo, he seems to be wearing a strange kind of body armour. Anyone any idea what it is?

[url:19gigd24]http://www.archart.it/archart/europa/France/Orange%20-%20roman%20arch/image4.html[/url]
(I think it's scale)

Also, top left above and behind the Bull standard - eagle headed swords. Parazonia?

[url:19gigd24]http://www.archart.it/archart/europa/France/Orange%20-%20roman%20arch/image18.html[/url]

And some more:
[url:19gigd24]http://www.archart.it/archart/europa/France/Orange%20-%20roman%20arch/image14.html[/url]
[url:19gigd24]http://www.archart.it/archart/europa/France/Orange%20-%20roman%20arch/image17.html[/url]
I think that eagle headed could be Falcatae. Think the arms and armour represented are from the enemy, no from the roman forces.
I have some photo of big definition, if will you.

[Image: scne2pf4.jpg] [Image: scne3mp4.jpg]

[Image: scnebq9.jpg]


Free copy

fronton: http://img164.imageshack.us/img164/7097 ... 0nm1eg.jpg



Vale
Quote:I think that eagle headed could be Falcatae. Think the arms and armour represented are from the enemy, no from the roman forces.
I thought of that, but would signa of those types, and what seem to be gladii, be part of the spoila?
Mark,

What you wanna do is find a copy of "L’Arc d’Orange" by Amy Robert.
Paris, Centre national de la recherche scientifique; renseignements et vente au Comité technique de la recherche archéologique de France, 1962

The text is French, but it's full of photos and line drawings. If all you're after is the Leg XX shield, let me know and I'll email you the image.
What does the writing on the shield mean?

[url:1778246a]http://www.archart.it/archart/europa/France/Orange%20-%20roman%20arch/image12.html[/url]
Ah, good point. Would it tell us if the equipment is Roman?
I think the writing was put down by the Romans when presenting the captured Gallic equipment to the gods. Sort of like saying, "To Mars, From Gaius" There's an earlier RAT post about this from a while back.

According to my Osprey book, "The Ancient Greeks" a Lakedaimonian shield was found which had been captured by the the Athenians. It was inscribed with text by the Athenians to give thanks for their victory. So, if the Greeks did this sort of thing, I'm sure the Romans were influenced by that custom.
Quote:I think the writing was put down by the Romans when presenting the captured Gallic equipment to the gods. Sort of like saying, "To Mars, From Gaius" There's an earlier RAT post about this from a while back.
A dedication makes sense.
Quote:
Andrew Brozyna:3dd7o682 Wrote:I think the writing was put down by the Romans when presenting the captured Gallic equipment to the gods. Sort of like saying, "To Mars, From Gaius" There's an earlier RAT post about this from a while back.
A dedication makes sense.

I have also found some reference to the word on the bottom of the shield, AVOT, to mean "has made" in ancient Gaulish. Apparently this was often used to identify the author, sponsor, or creator of the inscription as found in many ancient Gaulish inscriptions found in the region.
Here are some other really nice closeups I found (with no copyright watermarks)

The Archaeology of Rome's Provinces, University of Georgia

Among them is a a view of the shield from below. It appears the first part of the top word has broken away.

-Severus
That's really interesting, thanks. Why gaulish? Is it showing a Roman spoila of Gallic spoila?
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