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Full Version: Byzantine Weapons and Warfare
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Ospreys ""Romano-Byzantine Armies" describes this axe as 4th cent Byzantine from Konstantinoupolis part of Damabatron Oaks collection Washingdon. So probaly is not out of place in the era in question.

Byzantines had to solve the problem of extra heavy armors at least during the civil wars were both sides usuall fielded catafracts so their answer was mace (mantzoukion modern - matsouki), "morning star" (apelatikion), axe usually but not exclusively the Varangians and the Latinikon.

Kuura thanks for the image of the war hammer. Most people belive it was used by the "Latinikon" at the closing era of the empire.
Good info. Laudes!

Kind regards
Are we still talking about the axe in the belt of the infantryman in the picture? It looks exactly like the archetypal francisca to me; I'm wary of believing it's Byzantine if the only evidence we have is from Osprey. I'd prefer a source that's a little more reliable.

By the way, Kuura, those axes are really great.
Arrian also mentions Roman battle axes....
Oh, I've got no problem with Romans using battle axes (and I include the Romans based in Constantinople in this), but the axe in the picture is the shape of a francisca, which as I understand it was specific to the early Franks.
Some thoughts.

Are we dead sure about feansiska confined to franks only at this time?
Is pictorial depiction to be confined to "orthodoxy"?
Because if not the guy could:
1 being a frankish merc or outcast found his way in the Roman army
2 have looted the axe or paid a smith to make him one

Kind regards
Quote:Some thoughts.

Are we dead sure about feansiska confined to franks only at this time?
Not totally, but that's what the evidence suggests.
Quote:Is pictorial depiction to be confined to "orthodoxy"?

Not necessarily, but if not, there should surely be some note that this gear is not typical. As far as I can make out, the whole purpose of such pictures is to show the typical, so we can get a picture of what early Byzantine soldiers looked like.
Quote:Because if not the guy could:
1 being a frankish merc or outcast found his way in the Roman army
2 have looted the axe or paid a smith to make him one

Of course, but then they wouldn't be characteristic of Byzantine soldiers. They'd be something else.

I think they just got it wrong.
hello people
i am starting to making this model .it says a represent a byzantine officer of the 6th century.i am asking what others emblems can i use and what colors mainly used in the battle ?soldiers of tagmata had the same colors in uniform.any help would be great .
thank you dimitris
If you could get a scan of the shields from the Notitia Dignitatum, that would help. It was composed quite some time before the 6th century, but I think many of the emblems would still be appropriate. Unfortunately I do not have a copy myself. Maybe someone else on this board does, though Smile
hello thanks for the link but i see only round shields are the same for oval shields?
The Notitia illustrations are only circular - presumably easier to draw. Should be easy enough to stretch them to an oval shape when painting - certainly people do it all the time on wargames figures 8)
Thanks for the info Nicholas!!
Mr. Gaukroger, thank you very much for the link!
Can someone identify the date of the mosaic in the link below ?

[url:30axirdo]http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61ul4dEcvuL._SS500_.jpg[/url]

I believe it represents St. Demetrius (Demetrios). Judging from the quality of the mosaic it looks like it's from around 1000 A.D.. The lamellar armor would also seem to suggest such a late date, IMHO.

~Theo
Yes, it's Demetrios, from the Church of Hosios Loukas in Greece, and it's 11th century (I have the book).

Very pretty.
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