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Hi Folks

I'm looking for some help with my latest project. Although I've been keen on all things Roman for many years, and a practicing archer for nearly as long, I've never made a decent study of Roman archery. Now I would like to put that right and I'm hoping that the good folk of RAT can help me with references and material, as not having access to university libraries and the like, not to mention holding down a day job, I find locating suitable reference material difficult.

Can anyone point me in the right direction? Books, articles, conference papers, ancient or modern - anything that will help. Is there some sort of definitive study and I'm just not aware of it? Is there some ancient author who gives useful details hidden in the more familiar texts? Anything reliable available on the web would be particularly useful.

Anyway, I'm sure you get the idea. Anything that would help gratefully received. And of course, if my project ever comes to fruition (some do, some don't - ho hum) I'll be delighted to share with you all.

Thanks and valete.
You need to get a hold of Jon Coulston's definitive paper on "Roman Archery Equipment", which runs to over 100 pages.
In M.C. Bishop (ed.), The Production and Distribution of Roman Military Equipment (BAR-S275) (Oxford: British Archaeological Reports, 1985), pp. 220-336.
One starting point: http://www.romanarmy.com/rat/viewtopic. ... highlight=

A complete test on the effects of a composite bow on the lorica segmentata and hamata (in German): http://www.romanarmy.com/rat/viewtopic. ... highlight=

Drop me your email address: I can send you this article: B. Kargeru.a., Experimental Arrow Wounds: Ballistics and Traumatology, in: The Journal of Trauma: Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 45, Nr. 3, p.498

Regards
Quote:You need to get a hold of Jon Coulston's definitive paper on "Roman Archery Equipment", which runs to over 100 pages.
In M.C. Bishop (ed.), The Production and Distribution of Roman Military Equipment (BAR-S275) (Oxford: British Archaeological Reports, 1985), pp. 220-336.

Thanks for the pointer. Any idea how I can get the paper or access to it? I don't mind paying, but I simply can't find it.
I'm sorry for digging up this very very old topic, but is there anyone who has the mentioned article by Coulston in pdf? We have the BAR series at our university, but according to the digital catalogue apparently not the years 1979-1985. The typical library-irony.
As a traditional composite bowman, I wish you luck on the research project.

There was an evolution to Roman archery, first adopting methods and bows from the Lavant, and then from the steppe tribes after the swing to AD. Here are the Roman sayahs found at Caerleon, evidently from abandoned equipment, early 3rd century I believe. Smile


[attachment=6674]steppehistory012.JPG[/attachment]
Quadratus, you could try the Rijks Museum van Oudheden in Leiden, they have the (almost) complete BAR series. I believe you have to call them to make an appointment. I know, it is a long way from Belgium, but on the way to Amsterdam, so you could go with friends and conclude your research with pub-crawling in the Dutch capital.

Campbel, thank you for pointing out Coulston's article.
Guys, the topic is 6 years old, so answering those questions probably won't help them anymore I guess. I digged it up from underneath the dust for the following question. ;-)


Quote:I'm sorry for digging up this very very old topic, but is there anyone who has the mentioned article by Coulston in pdf? We have the BAR series at our university, but according to the digital catalogue apparently not the years 1979-1985. The typical library-irony.
Quote:Here are the Roman sayahs found at Caerleon, evidently from abandoned equipment, early 3rd century I believe.
That early? I have them as early 5th century?
Quote:
Alanus post=332942 Wrote:Here are the Roman sayahs found at Caerleon, evidently from abandoned equipment, early 3rd century I believe.
That early? I have them as early 5th century?

Chapman's catalogue of finds (BAR British Series 388) states all the bow parts (in the museum collection) were found in one building of the third century rampart building, so no later than 3rd C. They were found with what is believed to be the raw materials (animal bone) and it is also suggested that the room was used for their production.
The article you want - I copied for someone else a few years ago. There is a copy of the BAR publication in the University of Manchester library. I can a copy of the article copied from there - but the photocopying costs are quite high. I think I paid over £15 for the article about 4 years ago. But if you don't mind paying, then I can do it next time i'm in the area.

Cheers
Hi Claire,

No that wouldn't be necessary. ;-) It is available in another university here in Belgium, but I first wanted to look around if I could find it digitally. But thanks anyway. :-)