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I"ve seen a lot of articles lately, both from France and Italy, about recreating Roman wines which are available. There is also a market springing up for wines with ancient names, like Falernian (I have a bottle of that) but except for being bottled in Italy, I have no idea how they compare. I've never seen any critiques on the wines (plenty of volunteers though); perhaps you folks in Europe have tried them? I've tried finding importers but the yields appear to be too small for the producers to bother with.<br>
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Like wise, if you've seen them for sale in the US, I'd like to know where. <p></p><i></i>
This is an amazingly late reply, but here goes:

I have tried a wine that claims to be one of the closest to an ancient roman wine - Feudi di San Gregorio. It is bold, and VERY rich. It reminds you why they watered the wine.

http://www.feudi.it/

Aurelia
But is it sweet or dry?
For non Greek speakers please follow the links in english.
http://www.add.gr/wine/dionysus/
Enjoy
Kind regards
http://www.feudi.it/
Well....the Lacryma Christi Bianco or Rosso
will do a couple of us ladies..... :wink:
I rather like the Griffin label on the Rosso...... :roll:
regards
Arthes
Quote:But is it sweet or dry?

Hm. Not sweet, but not super dry. "It's a bold wine, with a hint of sophistication and lacking in pretention...Actually, I'm just talking about myself..."

~Aurelia
Quote:I have tried a wine that claims to be one of the closest to an ancient roman wine - Feudi di San Gregorio. It is bold, and VERY rich. It reminds you why they watered the wine.

http://www.feudi.it/

Aurelia

But which one of their wines is supposed to be Roamn. They appear to have very many?
I think they only export one version, but I'm not an expert there, either. I've had some of that San Gregorio, and I agree with Aurelia: it can be diluted 50% and still seem like a "normal" wine. The folks who bottle it are said to be growing the grapes in the same vineyard that some Roman vineyard existed. I can't swear it's from cuttings of the original vines, though. The wine we're talking about is red, but the San Gregorio folks make several wines.

I'd agree also that it's not sweet, but it's very dark colored, almost opaque in a glass, but not dry like say a Merlot...richer than Burgundy. None of that really communicates it. How does one describe a taste?
Quote:How does one describe a taste?
I asked my kids: Yum, Yuch, Wow, Blech.
They went on a bit.

In all seriousness, wine critics make a living out of just such descriptions of taste. Not being a wine connoisseur, I don't usually even understand what they are talking about.
I know what you mean, Tony. But when you get down to it, what does, "Elegantly fruity, with a mild berry flavor, robust and mellow, but not overpowering the bouquet" really mean?

What does licorice taste like? If you've never tasted it, how could you describe it to someone else? Either you like it or you don't. (OK, you could say it has the general flavor of anisette, but lacks the kick--that might work)
Strangely enough, browsing through the wines in the shops over the last couple of days, looking for something for Yule....I was looking for something 'ancient'...
I still have a bottle from the Roman Vineyard down in Wroxeter.....I was told the grapes are grown on what was known as 'the killing grounds' .... lol
Otherwise, I have developed a taste for a Sicilian wine - a mix of Etruscan blood of Jove (Sanguis Jovis) and Gaulish Merlot .... :roll: :roll:
Quote:I'd agree also that it's not sweet, but it's very dark colored, almost opaque in a glass, but not dry like say a Merlot...richer than Burgundy. None of that really communicates it. How does one describe a taste?

Demetrius,

Have you ever had a Cotes de Rhone wine? Is it on the order of that, they can be quite big and flavorful.

Mmmmm, wine!

Lucianus
_______
L.E. Pearson
My father was in the wines/spirits bussine from 1945.
An very old wine connoisseur had once told me:

Have a bite of your dish in your mouth and take a sip.
Alcachol eases the release of food flavors and taste experience increases.
If you try that and and the experience is good then the wine is good.

A small mumber of wines (usually) sweet are served independently.
Taste in room temperature in winter and slichtly cool in summer.

Never leave your wine to be exteemely cold even in summer!

If you hear about wine's fruity taste it mast come form the grapes.
Any other flavors suggest "tampering".

Enjoy your celabrations dinners and have a good time.

Kind regards
In a book about wine I read it stated that Roman wine was white and tasted like a Riesling. Sorry no source but that is the only thing I know about.
That "reconstructed" roman wines reminds me my grandfather´s village wine. They are called "vinos turbios de pitarra"(pitarra cloudy wine).The wine plants are grow, more or less wild, in little terraces, some not more than 10 sq. meters. When it´s time, they recollect and put the juice in ceramic "tinajas" or earthenware jars between 1-2 meters high.
[Image: tt_vinos04.gif]
Then they kept it closed, and what you get is a reddish-brown-yellowish (all in one glass, as is not cleaned or clarified) wine. Until the invention of vacuum plastic liquid bags it was impossible to carry it 5 Km. away from the village, as it got sour. At least some roman wine traveled better than this one...

And they still say is the best thing of that village!
I disagree with this, the Pata Negra (Black-leg) pig´s cured ham is better...but that it´s the fastest way of having a discussion. :lol:
I hope none of there is reading this and reads my real name (sometimes is not a good idea...) :roll:
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