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Dear all,<br>
<br>
I was directed to this website: www.romanofficer.com/ I have some grave doubts about what is offered and about the text which accompanies it. How about this one:<br>
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"The title Dux is one of the rarest used in the ancient Roman world. This rank was hardly ever used until Diocletian made it an official at the end of the 3rd Century. Diocletian used this rank to separate power from the military and the judicial branch of ancient Rome's government. A 3rd or 4th Century Dux had only military authority. The term Dummviri is a legal authority so this tag states that a Dux (Special Commander) was installed with legal authority. This would be a very rare occurrence and for the legionary that had the tag made up it seems that it was his career highlight. Could this legionary have made a record of the installment of Lucius Castus Artorius with powers of a Dux and a Dummviri? "<br>
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Is there any validity at all in there? Comments, please.<br>
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Chhers,<br>
Robert<br>
<br>
'Cives Francorum, Miles Romanorum' <p></p><i></i>

Guest

Salve,<br>
<br>
The comments on the site appear overall highly original, to put it in a friendly manner. It seems to lob together a range of terms rather than look at the text as a whole. It makes the distinct impression that all parts of the text were looked up in a list separately without the context in which they appear, like the translations in many modern manuals which appear to be put together using just a dictionary without any real knowledge of a language. Thus the combination of the letters A and D might stand for <i> Adiutrix</i> in some texts and D, U and M might be used for <i> duumvir</i>, but that is in certain contexts, not in this particular case. They can also stand for simply the Latin words <i> ad</i> or <i> dum</i> or quite different abbreviations.<br>
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The term <i> duumviri</i> is the plural, singular is <i> duumvir</i>. A <i> duumvir</i> is a member of a committee of two. The title was often used for the senior municipal magistrates as these were often paired (cf the <i> consules</i>). It does not represent a function at the provincial level. In the late empire it was not a very desirable function as the municipal elites were held responsible for tax collection, having to make up the difference between the assessed amount and actual local tax incomes.<br>
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<i> Dux</i> (leader) occurs occasionally before the reforms of Diocletianus and is used in a loose sense as commander of an undefined rank and position. It could be used for a legionary commander (eg <i> CIL</i> 2, 2634) or used alternatively to <i> praepositus</i> or <i> curator</i> for commanders of groups of <i> vexillationes</i> or other provisional commands of varying size and nature (eg <i> AE</i> 1890, 82; <i> AE</i> 1972, 378). Starting with his reign it gains wider usage as the title of the military commander of a province, separated from the civilian administration usually headed by a <i> praeses</i>. This was generally held by a <i> vir perfectissimus</i>, one of the grades of the original equestrian class. Military officers always had legal authority over soldiers and matters which involved soldiers and other parties.<br>
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Regards,<br>
<br>
Sander van Dorst <p></p><i></i>
I took another look at the site.<br>
I had bought some of his stuff, much less expensively, on ebay.<br>
He has a wonderfully vivid imagination, and occasionally exercises in the long jump while explaining his wares. He is a merchant, trying to make money and seems to willing to engage in speculative patter when hawking his wares. The castings I bought from him on ebay were well made. <p>"Just before class started, I looked in the big book where all the world's history is written, and it said...." Neil J. Hackett, PhD ancient history, professor OSU, 1987</p><i></i>
Sander, thanks for the comment. I was wondering about that inscription myself. Linda Malcor is using this piece as evidence for wide-ranging Sarmatian influence along the west of Hadrian's Wall. She asserts this was a large body (5000+) of troops which, as nomadic elite cavalry army not settled in any forts apart from Bremettanacum, need not (she asserts) be mentioned by any Roman source. (..) I have to reign her in quite often.<br>
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Caius, where do you think he bought his stuff? From 'antique dealers'? Or am I possibly right in thinking this it comes from 'private digs'..<br>
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Cheers,<br>
Robert<br>
<br>
'Cives Francorum, Miles Romanorum' <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://pub45.ezboard.com/uvortigernstudies.showPublicProfile?language=EN>Vortigern Studies</A> at: 10/10/02 9:47:29 am<br></i>
I refuse to speculate on where the originals came from.<br>
The copies are nice to give as awards and presents, however. Look for them first on ebay, and you can get them for about wholesale, sometimes. <p></p><i></i>
Sander,<br>
would you mind if I quoted your reply on another list? It ssems some people need convincing, and I think it would look better if I quoted the whole message.<br>
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Cheers,<br>
Robert<br>
<br>
'Cives Francorum, Miles Romanorum'<br>
<p></p><i></i>

Guest

Salve,<br>
<br>
No problem.<br>
<br>
Regards,<br>
<br>
Sander van Dorst <p></p><i></i>