RomanArmyTalk

Full Version: Basic Training, and then what?
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.

Anonymous

Once the a legionary recruit completed his basic training (circa mid 1st century AD), where there other "courses" offered to them, such as engineering, blacksmithing, book keeping etc.? Where did they learn these skills? Or were they taught this during basic, or once they were tasked to their respective legions, and given on-the-job-training?<br>
<br>
I am just curious, because in modern armies (at least western based ones), you do your basic, then you specialize in your MOC like infantry, artillery, storeman, transport etc. From there you can add more training courses, such as reconnaissance, comms courses, driver wheeled, machine gunner, etc.<br>
<br>
Thanks! <p>
<BR>
Magnus/Matt<BR>
Optio<BR>
Legio XXX "Ulpia Victrix" </p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://pub45.ezboard.com/bromanarmytalk.showLocalUserPublicProfile?login=tiberiuslantaniusmagnus>tiberius lantanius magnus</A> at: 10/3/02 3:33:52 am<br></i>

Guest

Salve,<br>
<br>
That makes you a multiple headed monster of Aaargh since this has been discussed in various threads before (here,here, here and here for example). Nevertheless for the benefit of those too lazy to browse the index here is a short overview on the matter in the imperial army. For the republican army there is much more limited information and it is very likely that it did not have a comparable elaborate structure.<br>
<br>
Men who passed the recruitment examination were called <i> probati</i> and entered a training period as recruits (<i> tirones</i>), which Vegetius asserts to have lasted four months, after which senior officers were to judge their proficiency and allow them to be entered in the records as soldiers (<i> milites</i>). Advanced training was possible for various functions, though only for a limited number <i> discentes</i> are recorded in the extant source material. This does not necessarily mean that others did not exist as people may have felt it unnecessary to have it recorded separately in their careers.<br>
<br>
The titles consist of the word <i> discens</i> (trainee) and the function for which they were in training either in the <i> genetivus</i> (second case) or <i> accusativus</i> (fourth case), both singular or plural. Known examples include:<br>
<br>
- <i> Discens aquiliferum</i>: trainee eagle bearer. <i> CIL</i> 8, 2568; 2988.<br>
- <i> Discens architecti</i>: trainee engineer. <i> CIL</i> 13, 7945.<br>
- <i> Discens armaturae</i>: trainee weapons instructor. <i> AE</i> 1991, 1114.<br>
- <i> Discens armorum</i>: weapons handling trainee. <i> AE</i> 1940, 117. ALso interpreted as <i> disgestor armorum</i> though.<br>
- <i> Discens capsariorum</i>: trainee medic. <i> CIL</i> 8, 2553.<br>
- <i> Discens equitum</i>: trainee cavalryman. <i> CIL</i> 5, 944; 8278.<br>
- <i> Discens epibatam</i>: trainee marine. <i> CIL</i> 3, 14567.<br>
- <i> Discens lanchiariorum</i>: trainee javelineer. <i> AE</i> 1993, 1575.<br>
- <i> Discens phalangarii</i>: trainee phalanx fighter. Unpublished.<br>
- <i> Discens signiferorum</i>: trainee standardbearer. <i> AE</i> 1992, 1872.<br>
<br>
Not necessarily, but possibly, military:<br>
<br>
- <i> Discens libratorum</i>: trainee surveyor. <i> AE</i> 1973, 646 does not mention an army unit, but <i> libratores</i> were definitely part of the army (eg <i> CIL</i> 8, 2728).<br>
<br>
For some positions, training may not have been too specific as there inscriptions attesting both a <i> discens aquiliferum</i> and <i> discens signiferorum</i> progressing to that of <i> aquilifer</i>. <i> Discentes equitum</i> are only attested for units of infantry with attached mounted troops, not for strictly cavalry units, where recruits entered directly into the ranks of the horsemen. Since <i> CIL</i> 8, 2553 distinguishes between <i> immunes</i> and <i> discentes</i> it seems that trainees were not yet granted the privileges of the job they were training for and would still as <i> munifices</i> have been liable for fatigue duties. <i> AE</i> 1981, 777 makes a difference between <i> tèroon</i> (Greek for <i> tiro</i>) and <i> mathètès hippeoon</i> (Greek for <i> discens equitum</i>) which indicates that basic training and advanced training were separate stages. There were no limits for soldiers starting training for specific jobs since some appear to have been appointed quite quickly and others became <i> discentes</i> after spending quite a while in the ranks.Some military careers point to a specialistion, eg primarily administrative functions,while other s indicate a succession of posts of diverse nature. Career patterns often appear quite loose with many exceptions to any set path attested.<br>
<br>
There are far fewer corresponding <i> doctores</i> (instructors) than <i> discentes</i> recorded, though instruction may have been part of the normal duties for various specialist and noncoms.<br>
<br>
Examples:<br>
<br>
<i> Armidoctor</i>: weapons trainer. <i> AE</i> 1953, 97.<br>
<i> Campidoctor</i>: drill instructor. <i> CIL</i> 2, 4083.<br>
<i> Doctor armorum</i>: weapons instructor. Vegetius <i> Epitoma</i> 1.13.<br>
<br>
To find the inscriptions referenced above in the online epigraphic databases one can use the EDH search page or this search program.<br>
<br>
<br>
Regards,<br>
<br>
Sander van Dorst <p></p><i></i>

Anonymous

oops.....sorry sander...lol<br>
<br>
<br>
AAAAARRRRRUUUGHHHH!!!! <p>
<BR>
Magnus/Matt<BR>
Optio<BR>
Legio XXX "Ulpia Victrix" </p><i></i>

Anonymous

oooOOOOoOOooooooo <p><BR><p align=center><font size=2><font color=gold>
_____________________________________________<BR>
The Way of a Warrior is based on humanity, love,<br>and sincerity.
The heart of martial valor is bravery,<br> wisdom, love, and friendship.
-- <i>Ueshiba Morihei</i>
<BR>
_____________________________________________</font></p><i></i>