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With all the talk of experimental archaeology, I was wondering what and how relevant the "Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference" was. From the site, I'm not sure what 'theoretical' is. It's a part of the "Roman Archaeology Conference" and they've both been going on for a while.<br>
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www2.arts.gla.ac.uk/RAC2001/index.htm<br>
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It is interesting that a past conference said:<br>
"Roman military archaeology has the image of being an unglamorous and somewhat backward branch of Roman archaeology. Yet the papers offered for the general session soon revealed that there was an exciting variety of research currently being undertaken with an explicitly theoretical agenda."<br>
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Take a glance at the papers presented at this conference:<br>
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www.dur.ac.uk/~drk0www2/#army<br>
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<p>Richard Campbell, Legio XX.
http://www.geocities.com/richsc53/studies/
ICQ 940236
</p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://pub45.ezboard.com/bromanarmytalk.showLocalUserPublicProfile?login=richsc>RichSC</A> at: 5/3/02 4:45:14 am<br></i>

Anonymous

Several fascinating issues there.<br>
This one I find especially enlightening:<br>
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Identities and Power. The Transformation of Space in Roman Britain<br>
Mark Grahame, Department of Archaeology, University of Southampton<br>
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One of the issues that has caused much debate in recent years is the significance of the transformation of space in Roman Britain. As is well known, Iron Age round houses gave way to villas, which then grew in complexity. It is understood that this transformation has social significance, but there is considerable disagreement as to its exact meaning. The debate has largely centred on whether this transformation represents the emergence of a new social structure based on the Classical model, or if it indicates the continuity of ‘Celtic’ social organisation.<b> This paper argues that if we are to resolve this question we need to understand the relationship between architecture and human being more closely. It asserts that architecture is implicated in the process of identity formation by affecting how individuals can encounter one another. Since ‘society’ can only exist in and through such interaction, architecture provides a valuable record of how social networks are constructed and reproduced.</b><br>
Since social networks are rarely equal, architecture also enables the creation and maintenance of social inequality. In this way its functions as a technology of power. As a consequence architecture can be seen as the objectification of social structure, enabling us to ‘read’ it more fully and elucidate its social meaning. Using these ideas, the transformation of space in Roman Britain will be reappraise and a new theory offered as to its social significance.<br>
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