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Anonymous

Greetings,<br>
<br>
From another thread, I found the livius.org website and was reading its articles on the legions and their history by Jona Lendering:<br>
<br>
www.livius.org/le-lh/legio/legions.htm<br>
<br>
There are several assertions in the article about the creation and ultimate fate of several legions that were different than what I had thought. Since Parker's book was my first exposure to legionary history, I still am skeptical of anything that contradicts him. However, his book was over 70 years old now. So, my question is: Does this article fairly represent currently accepted scholarly research or is it pure theory?<br>
For instance:<br>
Legio V Alaudae destroyed in 70 AD not in the 80s under Domitian.<br>
Legio XIV destoyed in 54 AD but immediately reconstitued.<br>
Both Legio XXX Ulpia & II Traiana formed in 105 AD. etc.<br>
<br>
There are other examples. But, after having read the awful Collins book about the Tenth Legion, I am very leary of any information that disagrees with what I thought was the accepted version.<br>
<br>
Thanks,<br>
Aussum <p></p><i></i>

Anonymous

Not sure about the first 2 legions, but I recreate XXX Ulpia Victrix, and the majority of the evidence states that it was formed in 105 AD along with II Traiana, but some scholars belive that the 30th may have been in operation since 101 AD.<br>
<br>
Can't name any sources, Lisa Kadanoga of BC, Canada wrote my legion history. If you want, I can have her clarify a few sources if required.<br>
<br>
<p>Tiberius Lantanius Magnus<BR>
CO/Optio,<BR>
Legio XXX "Ulpia Victrix"<BR>
(Matt)</p><i></i>
The Alaudae article by Franke in Bohec, Les Legions de Rome sous le Haut-Empire (2000), also points to 70 CE as the most probable date for the dissolution of V Al, instead of Domitian (that date was connected with the fragmentary altar at Adamklissi, but this is now no longer dated to Domitian, but to the Trajanic period).<br>
The destruction and reconstitution of the Caesarian XIVth can be read in Keppie, The making of the Roman Army. <p>Greets<BR>
<BR>
Jasper</p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://pub45.ezboard.com/ujasperoorthuys.showPublicProfile?language=EN>Jasper Oorthuys</A> at: 4/19/02 7:35:34 am<br></i>

Anonymous

This just goes to illustrate that there is much we really don't know, particularly regarding the demise of legions. The Romans rarely spoke of it openly, at most we can say that Legio Q "disappears from the record" about year z. Determining the exact circumstances is largely a matter of deduction. Witness the notorious case of IX Hispania.<br>
<br>
As to legionary origins, Parker was ecxellent for his time. I would tend to lean towards those given by Keppie (for an easilly obtainable English language source). They are generally well-reasoned and persuasive -- lacking contrary evidence, of course.<br>
<br>
Regards,<br>
John Hartwell<br>
<br>
"The fate of the Ninth still engages/<br>
The minds of both nitwits and sages/<br>
But that problem, one fears/<br>
Will be with us for years/<br>
And for ages and ages and ages."<br>
(There was a time when every English schoolboy knew that bit of drivvel!) EM <p></p><i></i>