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Has anyone read this? At first glance it is very good, hard to put down in fact. My criticism is that it is perhaps a bit light on the finer details of Roman maille construction but then it mostly, understandably, concentrates a lot of detail on segmental armour. It contains an interesting re-examination of the Corbridge finds and suggests that current reconstructions are based on erroneous previous interpretations and drawings: Mainly regarding shoulder plate contouring to better fit a human form and reversal of the shoulder pieces with the mid-upper shoulder guard having the point facing inwards towards the neck. It also gives evidence of better body contouring of the breast plates on some segmental armour. Does anyone know whether there has been a reconstruction using this re-interpretation: Also, whether there has been a challenge to this re-interpretation in academic circles? I guess, my question is, is this book and the re-interpretation reliable enough to be able base a reconstruction on? JF
Quote: reversal of the shoulder pieces with the mid-upper shoulder guard having the point facing inwards towards the neck
Not to pick nits, but that was pointed out (or in ;-) ) in the Corbridge Hoard report in 1988 (p.100 I think). Download it here (fully legal PDF of whole book).

Mike Bishop
Thanks Mike, I was hoping you might see this and take a bite. Very grateful for the link to the report pdf, will spend the next rainy day digesting all 150 pages of this with keen interest. It is interesting to see this reported new re-interpretation is in fact old news, 26 years old !
The custom makers have adjusted their work with the point facing inwards.

http://fabricaromanorum.shawwebspace.ca/...ridge_b_f/

Some custom makers still have the point outward and so does Deepeeka and DSC unless they modified it recently.
DSC didn't put a point on the mid shoulder guard. They used a mid-shoulder guard that was straight on both sides, which is also correct.
The book is easily worth £16 even if it isn't, it seems, going to make me "re-think not only the appearance, but also the function/fighting methods of the Roman soldier" as the publisher would suggest. I was interested by the measurements of some of the Corbridge plates: Some of the breast plates measured up to 3.7mm thick, but then I suspect it would be impossible to know how much expansion there has been due to corrosion and subsequent conservation.
I'd like to read it but won't buy it based on poor reviews.
Quote:The custom makers have adjusted their work with the point facing inwards.

http://fabricaromanorum.shawwebspace.ca/...ridge_b_f/

Some custom makers still have the point outward and so does Deepeeka and DSC unless they modified it recently.

Matt Lukes' work is quite glorious.
You know, I promise I tried to search for this using Travis in the search function but nothing came up, yet I see a existing thread on this book 4+ years ago: http://www.romanarmytalk.com/18-referenc...ravis.html
I did buy Sim and Kaminsky's book. I also have Sim's earlier book. Iron for the Eagles actually gets referred to more often by me than any other book I own on Roman equipment. It is a fairly small book but has a ton of useful info in it. I think that the Travis book would have been taken more seriously if they left out the section on mail completely and didn't put Hollywood wrist bracers in their illustrations.
I had a wry smile when I saw the test involving a 35lb bow against various quasi armours with and without padding.
Quote:It is interesting to see this reported new re-interpretation is in fact old news, 26 years old !
It's worth pointing out that the confusion arose in the first place because one of the sets had been repaired with a shoulderguard taken from another set and mounted with the point outwards. So far as I can see, a re-enactor could plausibly wander around with one shoulderguard pointing inwards and one out! It may not sound very 'military' , but it is very Roman ;-)

Mike Bishop
One one way, the other the other way. Good shout Mr Bishop. I have often been tempted by repairs to make my Seggies different. Happened at Exeter.
As for anyone still making Seggy shoulder plates pointing out....well, personally I would bypass them as Armour builders. As stated, this is not "new" info at all.
I have not read the book so I cannot pass judgement or comment upon it.
I will leave it at that.
Kevin


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Just as a note, I managed to have a discussion a few months ago with Hillary Travis on her books. She says she stays off social media because the intense criticism of one of her books caused intense emotional stress. This did not stop her and her husband from doing the new book, but they don't respond much to emails. I can't remember how I got her to respond in the first place.
It is a shame to hear this as the series of books on body armour, shields and helmets are worth buying, well produced and contain much useful/valuable information, even if they are open to criticism in parts: Aren't we all? I was hoping they might give the same treatment to Roman swords and would love to see some stats on surviving sword blade dimensions, thickness, construction, etc. I must also praise the Travii for saving me from a plan to commission a segmental armour from a reputable custom maker who makes their lorica with the points outward!
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